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for the Princess. I slept in the housekeeper's room on the ground floor. I opened the shutters of the window for light. I knew at that time that Captain Manby's ship was in the Downs. When I opened the shatters, I saw the Princess walking down the garden with a gentleman. She was walking down the gravel walk towards the sea. No orders had been given me

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over night to prepare breakfast early. The gentleman the Princess was walking with, was a tall man. I was surprised to see the Princess walking with a gentleman, at that time in the morning. I am sure it was the Princess. While we were at Blackheath, a woman at Charlton, of the name of Townley, told me that she had some linen to wash from the Princess's house. That the linen was marked with the appearance of The woman has since left Charlton, but she has friends there. I think it must have been before the child was brought to the Princess, that the woman told us this. I know all the women in the Princess's house. I don't think that any of them were in a state of pregnancy, and if any had, I think 1 must have known it. I never told Cole that Mary Wilson, when she supposed the Princess to be in the library, had gone into the Princess's bedroom, and had found a man there at breakfast with the Princess; or that there was a great to-do about it, and that Mary Wilson was sworn to secresy, and threatened to be turned away if she divulged what she had seen. FRANCES LLOYD. Sworn at Lord Grenville's House in Downing-street, the seventh day of June, 1806, before us,

A true Copy,

J. Becket.

ERSKINE,

SPENCER,

GRENVILLE,

ELLENBOROUGH.

(No. 7.)

The Deposition of Mary Ann Wilson.

I BELIEVE it will be ten years next quarter, that I have lived with the Princess of Wales, as housemaid, I wait on the ladies who attend the Princess. I remember when the child who is now with the Princess, was brought there. Before it came I heard say it was to come. The mother brought the child. It appeared to be about four months old when it was brought. I remember twins being brought to the Princess, before this child was brought. I never noticed the Princess's shape to be different in that year from what it was before. I never had a thought that the Princess was with child. I have heard it reported. It is a good while ago. Inever myself suspected her being with child. I think she could not have been with child, and have gone on to her time without my knowing it. I was at Southend with the Princes. Captain Manby used to visit the Princess there. I make the Princess's bed, and have been in the habit of making it ever since I lived with Her Royal HighAnother maid, whose name is Ann Bye, assisted with me in making the bed. From what I observed, I never had any reason to believe that two persons had slept in the bed. I never saw any particular ap- . pearance in it. The linen was washed by Stikeman's wife.

ness.

MARY WILSON. Sworn at Lord Grenville's House in Downing-street, the seventh of June, 1806, before us,

A true Copy,

J. Becket.

ERSKINE,

SPENCER,

GRENVILLE,

ELLENBOROUGH,

(No. 8.)

The Deposition of Samuel Roberts,

I AM a footman to the Princess of Wales. I remember the child being taken by the Princess. Ì never observed any particular appearance of the Prineess in that year-nothing that led me to believe that she was with child. Sir Sidney Smith used to visit the Princess at Blackheath. I never saw him alone with the Princess. He never stayed after eleven o'clock. I recollect Mr. Cole once asking me, I I think three years ago, whether there were any favourites in the family. I remember saying, that Captain Manby, and Sir Sidney Smith were frequently at Blackheath, and dined there oftener than other persons. I never knew Sir Sidney Smith stay later than the ladies. I cannot say exactly at what hour he went, but I never remember him staying alone with the Princess.

SAMUEL ROBERTS.

Sworn at Lord Grenville's House in Downing-street, the seventh day of June, 1806, before us,

A true Copy,

J. Becket.

ERSKINE,

SPENCER,

GRENVILLE,

ELLENBOROUGH.

(No. 9.)

The Deposition of Thomas Stikeman.

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I HAVE been Page to the Princess of Wales ever since she has been in England. When I first saw the child who is with the Princess, it is about four years ago. Her Royal Highness had a strong desire to have an infant, which I and all the house knew. I heard there was a woman who had twins, one of which the Princess was desirous to have, but the parents would not part with itayAwoman came to the door with a petition to get her husband replaced in the Dock Yard, who had been removed. She had a child with her. I took the child, I believe, and shewed it to Mrs. Sander I then returned the child to the woman, and made inquiries after the father, and afterwards desired the woman to bring the child again to the house, which she did. The child was taken to the Princess. After the Princess had seen it, she desired the woman to take it again and bring it back in a few days, and Mrs. Sander was desired to provide linen for it. Within a few days the child was brought again by the mother, and was left, and has been with the Princess ever since. I don't recollect the child had any mark; but upon reflection I do recollect the mother said he was marked with elder wine on the hand. The father of the child, whose name is Austin, lives with me at Pimlico. My wife is a laundress, and washed the linen of the Prince. Austin is employed to turn a mangle for me. The child was born in Brownlow-street, and it was baptized there; but I only know this from the mother. The mother has since lain-in a second time in Brownlow-street. I never saw the

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woman to my knowledge before she came with the
petition to the door. I had no particular directions
by the Princess to procure a child. I thought it bet-
ter to take the child of persons of good character, than
the child of a pauper. Nothing led me from the ap-
pearance of the Princess, to suppose that she was with
child, but from her shape it is difficult to judge when
she is with child. When she was with child of the
Princess Charlotte, I should not have known it when
she was far advanced in her time, if I had not been
told it. Sir Sidney Smith at one time visited very fre
quently at Montague House, two or three times a week.
At the time the Princess was altering her rooms in the
Turkish style, Sir Sidney Smith's visits were very fre-
quent. The Princess consulted him upon them. Mr.
Morell was the upholsterer. Sir Sidney Smith came
frequently alone. He stayed alone with the Princess
sometimes till eleven o'clock at night. He has been
there till twelve o'clock, and after, I believe alone with
the Princess. The Princess is, of that lively vivacity,
that she makes herself familiar with gentlemen, which
prevented my being struck with his staying so late. I
do not believe that at that time any other gentleman
visited the Princess so frequently, or stayed so late.
I have seen the Princess when they were alone sitting
with Sir Sidney Smith on the same sofa in the Blue
Room. I had access to the Blue Room at all times.
There was an inner room which opened into the Blue
Room. When that room was not lighted up, I did
not go into it, and did not consider that I had a right
to go
into it. I had no idea on what account I was
brought here. I did not know that the Princess's
conduct was questioned or questionable. I was with
the Princess at Ramsgate. When she was at East

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