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Tae design in the publication of the Eclectic Series is not merely to produce Class Books of sterling merit, for the purposes of instruction, but also to furnish them at much lower prices than are usually charged for similar text books. In the department of authorship, the services of the best educational talent of the country have been secured.

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC PRIMER:

For Little Children,

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC SPELLING BOOK:

For Primary Schools.

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC FIRST READER:

For the Youngest Pupils in Reading,

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC SECOND READER:

For Young Pupils in Reading.

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC THIRD READER:

For the Middle Classes.

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC FOURTH READER:

For the more advanced Classes.

McGUFFEY'S RHETORICAL GUIDE, or FIFTH READER.

A Rhetorical Reading Book for the highest Classes.

Professor McGUFFEY has furnished, in the above books, unsurpassed aids for the thorough instruction of youth in Spelling and Reading. They combine, in an eminent degree, the varied excellencies of nearly all other similar school books.

ARITHMETICAL COURSE: Compiled for the Eclectic Educational Series by Dr. Joseph Ray, Professor

of Mathematics in Woodward College.

RAY'S ARITHMETIC, PART FIRST.

Simple Lessons for Little Learners.

RAY'S ARITHMETIC, PART SECOND.

A Complete Text Book in Mental Arithmetic.

RAY'S ARITHMETIC, PART THIRD.
The best work extant for Common Schools and Academies.

Notwithstanding the many admirable text books which undoubtedly exist in this department of Mathematics, Rar's ARITHMETICs are rapidly superceding all others, as standard Class Books, in many of the best schools in our country.

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On the Analytic and Inductive methods of Instruction : with numerous

practical exercises. Designed for Common Schools and Academies. By Josipu Rar, M. D., Professor of Mathematics in Woodward College

Complete in one volume 12mo., 240 pages.

This work has been prepared expressly for the Eclectic Educational Series, and is the result of much labor and investigation. It is hoped that it will be found as meritorious in its department, as the highly popular Arithmetics by the same author, have already been pronounced by the educational public.

Gratifying evidence of its adaptation to the wants of Teachers and Pupils is found in the fact that the first edition is already entirely exhausted, though it is but a few weeks since its issue.

The following extract from the Preface will explain the plan of the work:

“ The object has been to furnish an elementary treatise, commencing with the first principles, and leading the pupil by gradual and easy steps, to a knowledge of the elements of the science. The design has been to present these in a brief, clear, and scientific manner, so that the pupil should not be taught merely to perform a certain routine of exercises mechanically, but to understand the why and the wherefore of every step. For this purpose every rule is demonstrated, and every principle analyzed, in order that the mind of the pupil may be disciplined and strengthened, so as to prepare him, either for pursuing the study of Mathematics intelligently, or more successfully attending to any pursuit in life.

“ Some Teachers may object that this work is too simple, and too easily understood. A leading object has been to make the pupil feel that he is not operating on unmeaning symbols, hy means of arbitrary rules; that Algebra is both a rational and a practical subject, and that he can rely upon his reasoning and the results of his operations, with the same confidence as in Arithmetic. For this purpose he is furnished, at almost every step, with the means of testing the accuracy of the principles on which the rules are founded, and of the results which they produce.

“Throughout the work the aim has been to combine the clear, explanatory methods of the French mathematicians, with the practical exercises of the English and German, so that the pupil should acquire both a practical and theoretical knowledge of the subject.”

The intention to render the works comprised in the Eclectic Series the cheapest School Books extant, has not been lost sight of in fixing the price of RAY's Algebra.

From D. S. Burson, Principal of Waynesville Academy. RAY'S ALGEBRA, Part First, is a work sui generis,' and more than any treatise with which I am acquainted, is calculated to make the study of Algebra popular, and will, I hope, by rendering the subject plain and intelligible, be the means of introducing this beautiful branch of mathematics into our common schools. Some may object to its simplicity; but, in my opinion, this is a most desirable feature. In most treatises on Algebra there is a lamentable want of clearness-in many, even a mystifying of the subject, the authors seeming to think that students generally have judgments aa ripe as their own. Hence a distaste on the part of pupils for this study. Prolixity on the one hand, and a dimly shadowing forth of principles, on the other, should be care fully guarded against by authors. This golden medium is, in my opinion, more nearly attained, both in Ray's Arithmetics, and in this treatise on Algebra, than in any works of similar design with which I am acquainted. I give the book my unreserved com mendation, and shall introduce it into our Academy.

D. S. BURSON.

THE HEMANS YOUNG LADIES' READER.

THE

HE MANS READER

FOR

FEMALE SCHOOLS:

CONTAINING

EXTRACTS IN PROSE AND POETRY,

SELECTED FROM THE WRITINGS OF MORE THAN

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY DIFFERENT AUTHORS.

Br T. S. PINNEO, A. M., M. D.

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PUBLISHERS:
NEW YORK:_ CLARK, AUSTIN: & SMITH.

CINCINNATI:-W. B. SMITII & co.

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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

ASTOR LENOX ANO
TILDEN FCUNDATION

004

ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year Eighteen Hundred and Forty-seven, BY WINTHROP B. Smith, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the District of Ohio.

The Lessons, contained in this book, have been selected with great care, from a large amount of material examined for the purpose. Every article has been carefully studied with reference to its instructive character, to its interest, to its appropriateness as an exercise for reading, and, also, especially with regard to its adaptedness to the cultivation of the female mind and heart. The development of correct sentiment and taste, the encouragement of gentle and amiable feeling, and the regulating and maturing of the social affections, have been objects constantly prominent in the mind of the compiler.

The title given to the work seems appropriate, as a tribute of respect and admiration to one, whose writings, purely and distinctly feminine, present to youthful aspiration a high standard of intellectual and moral excellence, and open a pure fount of religious sentiment and refined feeling.

More than one hundred and thirty different authors, male and female, are represented in this volume, and, in every instance, where practicable, the selection has been made directly from an edition issued under the eye of its author. Accuracy, beauty, and variety of style have, also, been carefully consulted, and alterations have been freely made, whenever necessary to secure this object. While it has been made an object of importance to give a decidedly moral and religious character to the instruction conveyed, every point of sectarian opinion has been carefully avoided.

Directions for reading are given in the introductory article, which may be useful as a review of previous instruction on the subject, or may be profitably made an introductory study, whenever this essential part of education has been neglected.

A few elliptical lessons have been introduced, which, while they give variety and interest to the work, and are adapted for practice in reading, serve also, as useful exercises in grammatical construction and composition.

To the teachers and pupils of that class for which it has been especially prepared, this work is presented, with the hope that it may, in some degree, prepare the youthful mind and heart for the high and holy duties of active life, and give an impulse and direction to that progressive development which will never cease, while the immortal part of our nature shall continue to exist.

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