Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub

THE NEW YORK
PUFLIC LIBRARY
218539

ASTO., LINOX AND
TILDEN TUVIATIONS

150i

Entered, according to the Act of Congress, by Thomas C. Upham,

in the Clerk's office of the District court of Maine.

PRESS OF J. GRIFFIN, BRUNSWICK.

Of the distinction between beauti- Of fitness considered as an ele-

ful and other objects

19 ment of associated beauty

45

Grounds or occasions of emotions Of utility as an element of associ-

of beauty various

20

ated beauty

46

Illustrations of the foregoing state- Of proportion as an element of

ment

21 associated beauty

47

Of the objects in general which Relations of emotions of beauty to

excite emotions of beauty 22 the fine arts

48

All objects not equally fitted to Differences of original susceptibil-

cause these emotions

23 ity of this emotion

49

A susceptibility of emotions of Objection to the doctrine of origi-

beauty an ultimate principle of nal beauty

50

our mental constitution 24 Summary of views in regard to

Remarks on the beauty of forms. the beautiful

51

-the circle

25 of picturesque beauty

52

Original or intrinsic beauty.-the

circle

26 CHAP.IV.-EXOTIONS OF SUBLIMITY.

Of the beauty of straight and an-

gular forms

27 Connection between beauty and

Of square, pyramidal, and trian- sublimity

5S

gular forms

28 The occasions of the emotions of

The variety of the sources of that sublimity various

54

beauty, which is founded on Great extent or expansion an oc-

forms, illustrated from the dif- casion of sublimity

55

ferent styles of architecture 29 Great height an element or occa-

Of the original or intrinsic beauty sion of sublimity

56

of colors

30 of depth in connection with the

Further illustrations of the origi-

sublime

57

nal beauty of colors

31 Of colors in connection with the

Of sounds considered as a source

sublime

58

of beauty

32 Of sounds as furnishing an occa-

Illustrations of the original beau-

sion of sublime emotions 59

ty of sounds

33 Of motion in connection with the

Further instances of the original sublime

60

beauty of sounds

34 Indications of power accompanied

The permanency of musical pow- by emotions of the sublime 61

er dependent on its being intrin- Of moral worth in connection

sic

35

with sublimity

Of motion as an element of beauty 36 Sublime objects have some ele-

Explanations of the beauty of mo- ments of beauty

63

tion from Kaimes

37 Emotions of grandeur

64

Of intellectual and moral objects Of the original or primary sublim-

as a source of the beautiful 38 ity of objects

65

Of a distinct sense or faculty of Considerations in proof of the ori-

beauty

39 ginal sublimity of objects 66

Influence of association on emo-

CHAP. III.- ASSOCIATED BEAUTY. tions of sublimity

67

Further illustrations of sublimity

Associated beauty implies an an-

from association

68

tecedent or intrinsic beauty 40
Objects may become beautiful by

Chap. V.-NATURE OF INTELLECTU-
association merely

41

AL TASTE.

Further illustrations of associated

feelings

42

Definition of taste and some of its

Instances of national associations 43

characteristics

69

The sources of associated beauty

Distinguishable from mere quick-

coincident with those of human ness of feeling or sensibility 70

happiness

44 Of the process involved in the for-

62

CROUS.

92

mation of taste

71 Of the prevalence of desire in this Instantaneousness of the decisions department of the mind 89 of taste

72 The nature of desires known from Of the permanency of beauty 79 consciousness

90

Of the place of desires in relation CHAP. VI.-EMOTIONS OF THE LUDI- to other mental states

91 Of an exception to the foregoing

staternent General nature of emotions of the The desires characterized by comludicrous

74 parative fixedness and permaOccasions of emotions of the ludi

nency

93 crous

75 Desires always imply an object Of Hobbes' account of the ludi- desired

94 crous

76 The fulfilment of desires attended Of what is to be understood by wit 77 with enjoyment

95 Of wit as it consists in burlesque Of variations or degrees in the or in debasing objects

78
strength of the desires

96 Or wit when employed in aggran- Tendency to excite movement an dizing objects 79 attribute of desire

97 Of other methods of exciting emo- Classification of this part of the tions of the ludicrous 80 sensibilities

98 Of the character and occasions of The principles, based upon desire, humor

81 susceptible of a two-fold operaOf the practical utility of feelings tion.

99 of the ludicrous

82

CHAP, II.-INSTINCTS. Chap. VII.-INSTANCES OF OTHER

Of the instincts of man as comSIMPLE EMOTIONS.

pared with those of the inferior Emotions of cheerfulness, joy,and

animals

100 gladness

83

Of the nature of the instincts of Emotions of melancholy, sorrow,

brute animals

101 and grief

84

Instincts susceptible of slight modEmotions of surprise,astonishment,

ifications

102 and wonder

Instances of instincts in the hu

85 Emotions of dissatisfaction, dis

man mind

103 pleasure, and disgust

86

Further instances of instincts in Emotions of diffidence, modesty,

104 and shame

87

Of the final cause or use of inEmotions of regard, reverence,

stincts

105 and adoration

88 Chap. III.-- APPETITES. THE SENSIBILITIES. Of the general nature and char

acteristics of the appetities 106 PART FIRST.

The appetites necessary to our

preservation, and not originalNATURAL OR PATHEMATIC SEN. ly of a selfish character 107

Of the prevalence and origin of SIBILITIES.

appetites for intoxicating drugs 108

Of occasional desires for action NATURAL OR PATHEMATIC SENTI

and repose

109 MENTS.

Of the twofold operation and mo-
rality of the appetites

110 CLASS SECOND.

Chap. IV.-PROPENSITIES.

men

THE DESIRES.

General remarks on the nature of the propensities

111

Ceap. I.-NATURE OF DESIRES.

1

« PoprzedniaDalej »