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humble supplication unto your honourable grace, that it may please the same, for Christ's sake, to be unto the aforesaid poor men their gracious patron and defender, either that they may enjoy their aforesaid leases and years renewed, (as, when their matter shall be heard with conscience, I suppose, both justice, conscience, and equity shall require; for that their • Collusion. leases shall be found, I trust, made without fraud or coven3,

either of their part or of mine; and also the old rents always reserved to the see, without any kind of damage thereof;) or if this will not be granted, then that it may please your gracious highness to command that the poor men may be restored to their former leases and years, and may have rendered to them again such sums of money, as they paid to me and to the chapter for their leases and years so now taken from them; which thing, concerning the fines paid to me, may be easily done, if it shall please your majesty to command some portion of those goods which I left in my house to be given unto them. I suppose that half of the value of my plate which I left in mine offices, and especially in an iron chest in my bed-chamber, will go nigh to restore all such fines received; the true sums and parcels whereof are not set in their leases; and therefore (if that way shall please your highness,) they must be known by such ways and means as your majesty by the advice of men of wisdom and conscience shall appoint. But yet, for Christ's sake, I crave and most humbly beseech your majesty, of your most gracious the widows pity and mercy, that the former way may take place. I have and father, also a poor sister, that came to me out of the north with and unde- three fatherless children for her relief, whom I married after

less is pure

filed reli

gion, as

St James saith: then is Bonner and his religion filthy and abomi

to a servant of mine own house: she is put out of that which I did provide for them. I beseech your honourable grace, that her case may be mercifully considered: and that the

nable which rather, in contemplation that I never had of him which

doth such

widow and

wrong to the suffered indurance at my entrance to the see of London, fatherless. one penny of his moveable goods, for it was almost half-aHardship. year after his deposition, afore I did enter in that place;

M.C.

yea, and also if any were left known to be his, he had licence to carry it away, or there for his use it did lie safe; and his officers do know, that I paid for the lead which I found there when I occupied any of it to the behoof of the church

standing

and

could

til that now

of these

or of the house. And moreover, I had not only no part of Notwithhis moveable goods, but also (as his old receiver, and then these godly mine, called Master Staunton, can testify,) I paid for him, requestsid towards his servants' common liveries and wages, after his be had un deposition, fifty-three li. or fifty-five pounds, I cannot tell of late some whether. In all these matters, I beseech your honourable shameful majesty to hear the advice of men of conscience, and espe- have been cially the archbishop now of York'; which, for that he was c continually in my house a year and more before mine imprisonment, I suppose he is not altogether ignorant of some part of these things; and also his grace doth know my sister, for whose succour and some relief now unto your highness I make most humble suit.

injuries by order of law

redressed. M.C.

The 16th day of October, 1555.

[Dr Heath. ED.]

N. R.

1. DISPUTATIO HABITA OXONII. 1555.

II.

ARTICLES JOINTLY AND SEVERALLY MINISTERED TO DR RIDLEY
AND MR LATIMER BY THE POPE'S DEPUTY.

III. LETTER OF DR TURNER, DEAN OF WELLS, TO FOX, TOUCHING CHIEFLY HIS KNOWLEDGE OF RIDLEY.

IV.

APPENDICES

V.

VI.

LETTER FROM STEPHEN GARDINER, BISHOP OF WINCHESTER, TO
RIDLEY.

LETTER FROM EDWARD, DUKE OF SOMERSET, THE PROTECTOR,
TO RIDLEY.

LETTER FROM EDWARD VI. TO RIDLEY.

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