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act, I see no reason why they should apply to was submitted. On its ratification by the York and one million in the State of Iowa, New the enemies of the bill for amendments on Legislature their constitution was declared to York ought to have four times as much plunder points that are purely trivial in their character; || have been adopted, and they entitled to repre- as the people of lowa, and to secure this should for, as was shown by my friend, the Senatorsentation in this Chamber and in the other have a corresponding representation. Sir, this from Nebraska, [Mr. Tipton,} the question is branch of Congress. But, sir, as it seems to is not, although it is frequently asserted to be, submitted in a different mode in the election me, with great respect for the Senator from a body composed of representatives of States. of the members of the Legislature. The bill | Vermont, it is a puerile question, to say that We do not vote here as representatives of now provides that they shall decide when they delegates may make and ratify a constitation States; we vote as Senators of the United convene whether the Territory shall be admit- and members of a Legislature may not do so. States. Neither the State of New York as a ted into the Union or not; and if they decide Who are the delegates in a Territory but the State, nor any other State in this Union, casts not to be admitted into the Union then this representatives of the people, elected at the a vote as such. Why, sir, how frequently are law becomes a nullity; and it is purely imma- polls for a specific purpose, for the purpose of the two Senators from any one State divided terial whether the provisions of the constitu- framing and adopting a fundamental law. If in their votes? Not frequently do the two Sention are acceptable in all respects to the people you call them members of the Legislature, elect ators from Indiana vote on the same side of a or not, if it is to become nugatory and void. them in the same way, and clothe them with great political question, and very frequently do But if they decide in favor of admission, and the same power, have you not achieved sub- they differ on questions of mere expediency, there should be found to be provisions in it, stantially the same thing; that is, a fair repre- ll questions even of local policy; and so with the as I have before remarked, that are not accept- sentation of the will of the people?

Senators from each of the other States. The able to the people, they will have the power to Mr. DAVIS. Will the honorable Senator roll of States is never called in this Chamber. change them, for the constitution itself pro- permit me to ask him a question?

That is only done in the other branch of Convides the mode; and if it did not thus provide Mr. HARLAN. Certainly,

gress. It is only the Representatives of the a mode for its own amendment, I apprehend Mr. DAVIS. A convention is elected spe- people in the other House that are called by no Senator here would contend for a moment cially to frame a constitution. A Legislature States to express their voice in this maoner, that they would not inherently have the right | is elected to do no such work, and therefore and then only in a possible case of disagree. to amend their fundamental law.

cannot legitimately make or adopt a constitu- ment in the Electoral Colleges in the selection
tion.

of a President of the United States. There is
this 'Territory to
tain a government; if they are willing to do so;

You call one a convention, and you being composed of representatives of States. if they probably have the capacity to enact call the other a Legislature. Suppose you Sir, we are representatives of the United and enforce laws for the protection of life, lib- reverse the names ; would it change the sub- States, and the moment a Senator-elect walks erty, and property, to make these reasonably stance? Suppose you call one legislative body; to that desk, and takes on himself the solemaisecure, and if they will have the opportunity that is, a legislative body composed of but one ties of his oath of office, he ceases to be the to amend their constitution in all these minor house a Legislature--and I suppose it would official representative of a State as such and respects, if they choose to do so, as seems to be competent for the people of a State to have becomes à legislator for this nation, and is me to be obvious, what reason is there for a Legislature of but one house--then it is in bound under his oath of office to do justice as refusing to permit them to come into the Union | identical form a convention. Does it change much to lowa as the Senators from that State as a State unless it be placed on the ground the substance to have two houses? Could not are to do justice to the people of his State. purely of inequality of representation, as meas- the people of a new community call a conven- It is important, however, that these local comured by population, in this Chamber?

tion of that form? Could not Congress do so ? munities should be represented here in order Mr. TERRY. Will the Senator allow me Could not they provide that members of a con. that we may be well informed as to the local one word?

vention should be elected to two branches, one necessities of the people of this great country; Mr. HARLAN. Certainly.

to be composed of a certain number of mem- It is important that their representatives should Mr. FERRY. There is now placed upon bers, and another to be composed of a smaller be here to inform this body of the necessities this constitution one condition which it is not number of members, and that before a con. of the communities among whom they live, as in the power of the people of Colorado to stitution should be adopted it should receive well as to give the Government the aid of their change; so that upon that provision no expres- the assent of both of these houses? Why, sir, counsel and advice in the passage of measures sion of the will of that people has ever been with great respect, this is a mere play of words. | pertaining to the general welfare. had.

What you desire in the ratification of a consti- Now, sir, in the Territory of Colorado the Mr. HARLAN. That will be had by them tution to be the fundamental law of a State | people of this nation have larger interests as a in the election of members of the Legislature. is to ascertain that it proceeds from the mind nation than they have in New York or Ken. If they are not willing to live under the con- of the people themselves; that it is the expres: tucky. They have a vast public domain-to be stitution with this clause in it, they will vote sion of their will. It has not been usual until

disposed of; they have vast mineral interests, for members to represent them who will vote recently in this country to submit laws, funda- aod the people of that locality are in imme. against its adoption.

mental or statute, directly to the people for diate contact with independent tribes of people Mr. EDMUNDS. Will the Senator permit | ratification.

over whom this nation exercises a kind of me to ask him a question?

Mr. EDMUNDS. Not constitutions ? guardianship, but nevertheless are compelled, Mr. HARLAN. Certainly.

Mr. HARLAN. Not constitutions. Few, || by the usages, at least, of the nation, to treat Mr. EDMUNDS, I wish to ask him if he if any, of the constitutions, at least of the old as independent communities. Now, I inquire ever knew or heard of an instance where a States, that were in force at the organization whether we do not need the advice and counsel question of this kind was submitted to a Legis- of this Government, were submitted directly of representatives from that community in this lature instead of to the people when it was to a vote of the people. I am informed by Chamber in order that our votes may be intel: going to be submitted at all in the admission | my friend, the Senator from Missouri, (Mr. | ligently cast in relation to the disposition of of any State before this one?

DRAKE,] that not one half of all of them now that vast public domain stretching from the Mr. HARLAN, Was it not so in the case in force have ever been submitted directly to northern border of Mexico up to the British of Nebraska ?

the people. To say that a people have not possessions, covering what in any other coun: Mr. TIPTON. Yes, sir.

power to clothe their delegates with authority try might be carved up into a home for several Mr. EDMUNDS. No, sir. to make a fundamental law that will be bind.

great and powerful nationalities? Here in this Mr. HARLAN. I understand from the Sen- | ing on them without first submitting it to a Chamber you have no representative of that ator from Nebraska that a similar question was vote of the people is a new doctrine in this vast region. You have delegates in the other submitted to the Legislature of that State. country.

House without a voice-legalized lobbyists ; Mr. EDMUNDS. Permit me to correct the Sir, this is a representative Government. nothing more. Sir, we need a representation Senator. It was not submitted to the Legisla | Your laws are made, not by the people, but by from these large Territories and from these vast ture of Nebraska whether they would be ad- represcatatives of the people. They are adju- and expanding interests in order that we may mitted into the Union or not. It was submitted ) dicated, not by the people en masse, by the

enact the necessary laws to develop them in to them to ratify the perpetual condition we people at the polls, but by the representatives an intelligent and enlightened manner. It is imposed upon them.

of the people on the judicial tribunals. Your not for the purpose of parceling out goods and Mr. TIPTON. That was the only condition laws are enforced, not by the people en masse, chattels that Senators come to this Chamber, on which we were admitted.

by their votes, but by their representatives in I suppose, but for the purpose of lending to Mr. EDMUNDS. Exactly; but here this the executive offices of the State and of the the nation their advice and counsel in the manproposition is to leave the Legislature to decide nation. This, therefore, is a representative agement of the vast interests submitted to our yea or nay whether they desire to be admitted | Republic, and the people may, if they choose, control; and in order that this may be done into the Union at all; and my question was clothe their delegates with authority to settle | intelligently I submit that it is important at whether there was ever a case of that kind | finally the question of the adoption either of a | this time that that vast country and that grow before.

fundamental or a statute law. With great | ing community, very soon to be a great agri: Mr. HARLAN. This is more technical than respect, therefore, I conclude there is nothing cultural community, shall bave a voice in this real, for if the Legislature of Nebraska had in the objection submitted by the Senator from and the other Chamber. failed to ratify that fundamental condition Kentucky.

Mr. CRAGIN. Mr. President, I shall octhey were not to be received; they were not to But, sir, Senators argue as if this Senate was cupy but a very few moments in stating one be a member of the Union. It was for the pur- organized for the division of spoils, and not or two points. I have no objection to the pose of settling the question whether they were to make laws; that if there are four million amendment resubmitting this constitution to to be admitted that that fundamental condition | people within the limits of the State of New | the people of Colorado. Believing that that

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people are anxious for admission into the Territory was $41,781 05. In 1867, last year, Mr. CONNESS. It is for the Chair to object,
Union, I feel confident that they will readily the amount of internal revenue tax collected not the Senator.
adopt the constitution; and believing, as I do, from this Territory was $151,686, being more Mr. EDMUNDS. Yes, sir; it is for me to

is than five times what it was at the time of the || object also. represented , I am

The Chief Clerk proceeded to call the roll on ious that they should have an opportunity to show a large increase of population.

the motion for an executive session, with the be admitted, and for that reason I shall not I desire to say to the Senator from Kentucky, following result: oppose the amendment.

who has been telling us that Montana has a YEAS-Messrs. Buckalew, Cameron, Cole, ConkAs bearing upon two important points in population equal to Colorado, that the evidence ling, Corbett, Davis, Drake, Edmunds, Tessenden, this case, that of population and that of the is the other way. So far as the receipts from rill of Maine, Morton, Patterson of New llampshire, capacity of this Territory to support a State postage and the receipts from internal revenue Pomeroy, Ross, Sprague, Sumner, and Vickers-22. government, I beg leave to read a passage from are concerned they are not one fifth as great

NAYS–Messrs. Conness, Cragin, Ferry, Freling

huysen, Harlan, Howard, McDonald, Nye, Ramsey, the last report of the Commissioner of the Gen- as those derived from the Territory of Colorado. Stewart, Thayer, Tipton, Trumbull, Wade, Willey, eral Land Office, made to the Secretary of the I wish to make this point again, and clearly,

Williams, Wilson, and Yates--18. Interior. The Commissioner of the General to the Senate: that in 1864, when Congress

ABSENT -- Messrs. Anthony, Bayard, Cattell,

Chandler, Dixon, Doolittle, Fowler, Grimes, HenLand Office is the gentleman whose capacity passed the enabling act inviting this Territory derson, Morrill of Verinont, Norton, Patterson of and industry was so largely commented upon into the Union, the receipts from postage in || Tennessee, Rice, Saulsbury, Sherman, and Van Winin this Chamber yesterday. In his report he that Territory were only $16,000, and in 1867

kle-16. says:

they were over thirty-two thousand dollars, The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Before "The elements of an agricultural character are as more than double to my mind demonstration | declaring the result of the vote, the Chair yet variously reported, but unquestioned facts rep- conclusive that the population has largely in

will lay before the Senate certain matters now resent enormous yields of cereals from imperfect agricultural enterprise. Sixty bushels of wheat to creased. Then there is the further fact, that

on the table. the acre is a crop well attested in several localities. the internal revenue tax collected last year,

EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS. The mineral wealth of the country is enormous; the when the receipts generally fell off, amounted yield of gold in 1862 was reported at $12,000,000. Sil

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before ver has been mined on Snake river which produces to $151,000 as compared with $41,000 in 1864

the Senate a letter from the Secretary of War, $600 per ton. Large tracts of bituminous coal are a larger amount of receipts for postage, and il ter posted. The population in 1860 was thirty also for internal revenue, than" was collected || inclosing a communication from General Stone

man, commanding the first military district, 1863 it was eighty thousand; the present population from several of the States now in this Union

to election to held therein, is a matter of conflicting estimates. It is probably represented in Chamber. near one hundred thousand. The immigration is rapid. The completion of the Pacific railroad will soon enable it to reach a still higher aggregate. DenUnion combined did not equal the receipts which was referred to the Committee on the

recommendations of said communication ; ver City, Central City, Colorado City, and Nevada

from Colorado alone. City are the principal towns. The public lands undisposed of in Colorado are over sixty-two million As I remarked the other day, I am entirely Judiciary, and ordered to be printed.

He also laid before the Senate a letter of the eight hundred and fifty thousand acres.' satisfied that there is a population in this Ter

Secretary of the Interior, communicating a Turning now to the report of the surveyor ritory of from seventy-five to one hundred thou

report of Thomas Murphy, superiintendent of general, the local officer in that Territory, I sand. I am entirely satisfied that the resources

Indian affairs, central superintendency, relaread as follows:

of this Territory are vast, and rapidly being tive to affairs in his superintendency; which "My predecessor in his last report estimated the developed; that the population will increase,

was referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs. number of acres of land capable of cultivation in and rapidly increase; and I am in favor of the

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE. the Territory at four million acres.

admission of the Territory as a State into the I call the attention of the Senator from Ken

Union. Congress once invited this Territory A message from the House of Representatucky to that fact.

with two others to come into the Union. The tives, by Mr. CLINTON LLOYD, its Chief Clerk, Mr. DAVIS, Will the honorable Senator

other two have been admitted. There is no announced that the House had passed the folfrom New Hampshire tell me how many mil

reason that prevailed in the case of Nevada or lowing bills and joint resolutions, in which it lion acres of land there are in all in the Terri

Nebraska wbich does not equally prevail in the requested the concurrence of the Senate : tory?

case of Colorado. I believe that the popula- A bill (H. R. No. 1027) to authorize the conMr. CRAGIN. About one hundred and

tion of this Territory is larger than the popu- struction of & bridge over the Black river, in five thousand square miles.

lation of Nevada to-day, or the population of Lorain county, Ohio ; Mr. DAVIS.' Then there are about one

Nebraska at the time she was admitted. I A bill (H. R. No. 1322) for the relief of hundred times as many acres of land in all as

hope, sir, that Colorado will now be admitted Major F. F. Stevens, assistant paymaster Unithere are acres of arable land? into the Union.

ted States Army;. Mr. CRAGIN. Of course it is well under

Mr. EDMUNDS. Mr. President, I look A bill (H. R. No. 1324) for the relief of stood that this Territory is largely mountain:

upon this as an entirely different question, so Mrs. Mary Harris, of Oregon; ous; but I am speaking about its agricultural

far as it relates to this Territory, and as a new A bill (H. R. No. 1325) for the relief of resources. The surveyor general says:

question, one over which we have complete | Benjamin B. French, late Commissioner of "My predecessor in his last report estimated the

jurisdiction, and one in respect to which our Public Buildings; number of acres of land oapable of cultivation in the

decision, and that of the people of that Terri. A joint resolution (H, R. No. 312) relative Territory at four million acres. It is a fact that all tory, if they vote to come in, will be final. It to the pay of the Assistant Librarian of the the land that can be irrigated is susceptible of cultivation, and produces well. The mountain stroams

cannot be repealed as a law can; if we make a House; fall very rapidly, and thus can be carried by irrigat

mistake in passing it, there is an end of it. A joint resolution (H. R. No. 313) respecto ing ditches to cover immenso quantities of land, and I am led to believe that at least ten million acres of

I suppose the Senator | ing treaties hereafter to be made between the land can be cultivated. The crops last year were

desires to address the Senate at some length, 1) United States and the Indian tribes; and good. It was the first year, I am told, that sufficient

and if he will give way I will move an execu- A joint resolution (H. R. No. 314) for the produce had been raised to supply the demands of tive session.

relief of George D. Blakey, late collector of the Territory.”

Mr. EDMUNDS. Yes, sir; I will give way. the second district of Kentucky.
Mr. EDMUNDS. Does he give the number
Mr. CONNESS. I hope not.

The message also announced that the House of bushels of wheat and corn raised?

Mr. EDMUNDS. Do not force me to go on had passed the following bills of the Senate: Mr. CRAGIN. Ithink not. He continues : at this time.

A bill (S. No. 367) for the relief of Albert "The present year farming is being carried on with

Mr. CONNESS. The Senator says, “Do | Grant; success, the grasshoppers, the great dread of the farm- not force me to go on at this time."

I hope er, having done but little damage to the crops. Wheat;

A bill (S. No. 452) for the relief of Parker oats, barley, corn, potatoes, &c., all look well and

he does not contemplate making a speech on Quince; promise an abundant yield, and I predict that it will this subject.

A bill (S. No. 474) for the relief of Captain be but a few years until this Territory will produce

Mr. POMEROY. I understand that the Dan. Ellis; and more than enough to supply her wants."

Senator from Vermont desires to discuss this A bill (s. No. 251) for the relief of Captain I

propose to refer to two other points as matter at some length. He certainly has the Charles N. Goulding, late quartermaster of showing the population of this Territory. As right to do so.

volunteers. I stated the other day, in speaking on this Mr. 'CAMERON. I think we had better

ENROLLED BILLS SIGNED. question, in 1864, when the enabling act passed, adjourn. It is now nearly four o'clock on Satauthorizing this Territory to form a State gov

The message also announced that the Speakurday afternoon. ernment, the receipts of the Post Office De- Mr. EDMUNDS. I yield for the purpose

er of the House had signed the following en

rolled bills; and they were thereupon signed by partment for postage in that Territory were of an executive session. $16,000. The receipts in 1867 were over

Mr. POMEROY. I move that the Sen.

the President pro tempore of the Senate : thirty-two thousand dollars, more than double

A bill (S. No. 367) for the relief of Albert ate proceed to the consideration of executive

Grant; what they were in 1864. I adduce these figures || business. as evidence of an increase of population. Mr. CONNESS. On that motion I call for

A bill (S. R. No. 454) for the relief of Mr. EDMUNDS. Was the Army there last

Captain Dan. Ellis; and the yeas and nays. year? The yeas and pays were ordered.

A bill (S. No. 452) for the relief of Parker Mr. CRAGIN. No, sir. I refer, also, to Mr. CONNESS. All this day we have

Quince. the receipts of internal revenue. In 1864, at wasted.

HOUSE BILLS REFERRED. the time the enabling act was passed, the whole Mr. EDMUNDO. I object to any debate on The foMowing bills and joint resolutions amount of internal revenue collected in this this question.

received from the House of Representatives

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INDIAN TRIBES.

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were severally read twice by their titles, and The Senate thereupon proceeded to the con

The SPEAKER. The gentleman from New referred as indicated below:

sideration of executive business ; and, after | York (Mr. TABER) has been called home by A bill (H. R. No. 1027) to authorize the some time spent therein, the doors were

sickness in his family. He desired the Chair construction of a bridge over the Black river, reopened, and the Senate adjourned.

to ask indefinite leave of absence for him. in Lorain county, Ohio-to the Committee on

Leave was granted. Post Offices and Post Roads.

The SPEAKER also asked and obtained A bill (H. R. No. 1322) for the relief of

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

indefinite leave of absence for Mr. McCormick. Major F. F. Stevens, assistant paymaster Uni

SATURDAY, June 27, 1868.

TREATIES WITH ted States Ariny—to the Committee on Claims. The House met at twelve o'clock m. Prayer A bill (H. R. No. 1324) for the relief of

Mr. JULIAN, by unanimous consent, introby Rev. A. L. LINDSLEY, of South Salem, New Mrs. Mary Harris, of Oregon--to the Com- York.

duced a joint resolution (H. R. No. 313) mittee on Claims.

The Journal of yesterday was read and

respecting treaties hereafter to be made beA bill (H. R. No. 1325) for the relief of

tween the United States and the Indian tribes; approved. · Benjainin B. French, late Commissioner of

which was read a first and second time. PAY OF ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN.

Mr. JULIAN. I desire tbat this resolution Public Buildings-to the Committee on Public

Mr. BLAINE. A resolution in regard to Buildings and Grounds.

shall be considered at the present time. A joint resolution (H. R. No. 313) respect

the pay of the Assistant Librarian in charge The joint resolution, which was read, recites ing treaties hereafter to be made between the

of the Ball Library, was passed yesterday, by in the preamble that sundry treaties between United States and the Indian tribes--to the

mistake, as a simple House resolution. I ask the United States and different Indian tribes Comniittee on Indian Affairs.

unanimous consent that it be considered as a have heretofore been concluded, by virtue of A joint resolution (H. R. No. 314) for the

joint resolution, and sent to the Senate for which large bodies of land have been trans

action. relief of George D. Blakey, late collector of

ferred to individuals and corporations in con. the second district of Kentucky--to the Com

No objection was made; and accordingly, travention of the spirit and policy of the pre. mittee on Claims.

by unanimous consent, the joint resolution (H. emption and homestead laws of the United

R. No. 312) in relation to the pay of the Assist. States; and that the lands now known as Indian ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN OF THE HOUSE. ant Librarian of the Ilouse was read a first, sec- reservations, on the extinguishment of the The joint resolution (H. R. No. 312) rela. ond, and third time, and passed.

Indian title thereto, should become the prop. tive to the pay of the Assistant Librarian of the

PAYMENT OF BOUNTIES.

erty of the United States and a part of the House was read twice by its title. Mr. MORRILL, of Maine. I ask the Sen

The SPEAKER, by unanimous consent, laid

public domain thereof, and cannot rightfully be before the House a communication from the

disposed of otherwise. The joint resolution ate to hear a statement, and by unanimous

therefore provides that in any treaty wbich may consent to allow that resolution to pass at the Secretary of War, transmitting, in compliance

hereafter be concluded between the United with the resolutions of the House of Represent. present time. It is to give execution to a res. atives of the 15th and the 22d instant, a report

States and any Indian tribe, by which the title olution of the House.

of such tribe to their lands shall be divested, Mr. EDMUNDS. If we are not going into

from the Paymaster General as to the number executive session, I want to go on with my of bounties paid under the act of July 28, 1866,

the same shall be conveyed directly to the

United States, and shall thenceforward be subsince the 1st of July last; which was referred | ject to the authority of Congress in the same remarks. Mr. MORRILL, of Maine. Very well; let

to the Committee on Military Affairs, and
ordered to be printed.

manner as all other public lands. the resolution lie on the table. I will call it up

The joint resolution was ordered to be again.

OFFICERS IN QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. engrossed and read a third time; and being LEAVE OF ABSENCE.

The SPEAKER also, by unanimous consent, engrossed, it was accordingly read the third Mr. STEWART. I ask leave of absence for laid before the House a communication from

time, and passed. Mr. Rice, of Arkansas. I should like to have the Secretary of War, concurring in the recom

Mr. JULIAN moved to reconsider the vote the leave of absence extended from the 23d of mendation of the Quartermaster General and

by which the joint resolution was passed; and this month to the 10th of July. He was necesthe General of the Army, relative to majors and

also moved that the motion to reconsider be sarily called away. captains in the quartermaster's department,

laid on the table. Leave was granted. for the repeal of the act of July 28, 1866, re

The latter mo:ion was agreed to.
ducing the number of said officers; which was

REBECCA J. SHEPPARD),
REPORTS FROM COMMITTERS.

referred to the Committee on Military Afairs, Mr. MORRILL, of Maine, from the Com. and ordered to be printed.

Mr. MYERS, by unanimous consent, intromittee on Appropriations, to whom was referred

duced a bill (H. R. No. 1318) authorizing the

OBSTRUCTIONS IN DELAWARE RIVER. the bill (H. R. No. 1073) making appropria

Secretary of the Treasury to issue a new bond tione for the current and contingent expenses

The SPEAKER also, by unanimous consent,

to Rebecca J. Sheppard, of Philadelphia, in of the Indian department, and for fulblling laid before the House a communication from place of one destroyed by fire; which was read treaty stipulations with various Indian tribes the Secretary of War, transmitting a petition a first and second time, for the year ending June 30, 1869, reported it from the Board of Marine Underwriters, &c.,

Mr. MYERS. I ask the reference of the with amendments. of Philadelphia, with a report by the chief of

bill to the Committee of Ways and Means. Mr. SPRAGUE, from the Committee on engineers, for an appropriation of $6,000 for

Mr. HOLMAN. I think this bill should be Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (S. the removal of certain obstructions in the Del.

referred to the Committee of Claims, that No. 573) to provide for a lite boat to be sta

a vare river ; which was referred to the Com- committee having a number of similar cases tioned on Narragansett beach, Rhode Island, mittee on Commerce, and ordered to be printed.

under consideration. It is proper that some reported it without amendment. LIGHT-HOUSE AT BLACKROCK, CONNECTICUT.

uniform rule should be applied in these cases.

Mr. MYERS. This bill appropriately be AMENDMENT TO APPROPRIATION BILL. The SPEAKER also, by unanimous con- || longs to the Committee of Ways and Means, Mr. SPRAGUE submitted an amendment

sent, laid before the House a communication It has heretofore been considered by that comintended to be proposed to the bill (H. R. No.

from the Secretary of the Treasury, transmit- mittee and passed by the House, but the Sea818) making appropriations for sundry civilting a letter from the Light-House Board, rel- ate failed to pass it. expenses of the Government for the year end- ative to a light-house at Blackrock, Connecti- Mr. HOLÁIAN. I will pot insist on the jug June 30. 1869, and for other purposes ; cut, recommending its erection ;

reference of the bill to the Committee of which was referred to the Committee on Ap

referred to the Committee on Commerce, and Claims, though I think that is the proper refer: propriations. ordered to be printed.

ence. PRINTING OF A DOCUMENT.

SARATI A. BRIGGS.

The bill was referred to the Committee of Mr. RAMSEY submitted the following reso. Mr. PAINE, by unanimous consent, intro

Ways and Means. lution; which was referred to the Committee duced a bill (H. R. No. 1316) granting a pen.

Mr. HOLMAN moved to reconsider the on Printing : sion to Sarah A. Briggs; which was read a

vote by which the bill was referred; and also Resolved, That five thousand additional copies of first and second time, and referred to the

moved that the inotion to recousider be laid on Executive Document No. 240, H. R., parts one and Committee on Invalid Pensions,

the table. two, bo printed for tho use of tho Senate.

The latter motion was agreed to.
EXHIBITION OF STBAM-PLOW.
Mr. PAINE also, by unanimous consent,

CAPTAIN DAN. ELLIS.
Mr. SPRAGUE submitted the following res- introduced a bill (H. R. No. 1317) granting a
olution ; which was considered by unanimous

Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, from pension to E. R. Caine; which was read a the same committee, reported back Senate bill consent, and agreed to:

first and second time, and referred to the Com. No. 474, for the relief of Captain Dan. Ellis, Resolved. That the Committee on Agriculture inmittee on Invalid Pensions.

with the recommendation that it be passed. quire into the expediency of procuring the best stcamplow and apparatus for exhibition on grounds of the

The bill was read at length. It appropriates

LEAVE OF ABSENCE. Department of Agriculturo.

Mr. JUDD. I desire to say that I have Carter county, in the State of Tennessee, in

the sum of $3,060 to Captain Dan. Ellis, of
EXECUTIVE SESSION.
received a letter from my colleague, [Mr. compensation for his services as scout

, pilot

, The PRESIDENT pro tempore. On the Coox,] saying that he is too unwell to return question of going into executive session the at the time he had expected. I ask an exten-1 of the Government from 1861 to 1865, during yeas are 22, and ihe nays 18; so the motion is sign of his leave of absence for four days. the late war. agreed to.

Leave was granted.

The bill was ordered to a third reading;

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it was accordingly read the third time, and
passed.

Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, moved
to reconsider the vote by which the bill was
passed ; and also moved that the motion to
reconsider be laid on the table.
The latter motion was agreed to.

PARKER QUINCE.
Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, from
the same committee, reported back Senate bill
No. 452, for the relief of Parker Quince, with
the recommendation that it do

pass.
The bill was read. It authorizes and directs
the Secretary of the Treasury to allow to
Parker Quince, in the settlement of his accounts
with the Government, $1,608 97, for his salary
as collector of customs for the port of Wil-
mington, North Carolina, and acting collector
of internal revenue from September 13, 1865,
to May 14, 1866, in addition to the sums already
paid him for salary for that period.

The bill was ordered to a third reading; and
it was accordingly read the third time, and
passed.

Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, moved to reconsider the vote by which the bill was passed: and also moved that the motion to reconsider be laid on the table.

The latter motion was agreed to.

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Mr. BENJAMIN. I withdraw my point of or less amount of appropriation, and he has order,

stated that there is no reason for the reference The SPEAKER. The question is on the of this bill except that it contains an approprithird reading of the bill.

ation. I do not wish to take up any further Mr. BUTLER, of Massachusetts. I renew time, and therefore I move the previous ques. the point of order.

tion. Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts. Does Mr. BUTLER, of Massachusetts. If my not the renewal come too late?

colleague says he has examined this case, and The SPEAKER. The motion to refer to knows it is right, I have so much confidence in the Committee on Appropriations covered the him that I withdraw my objection. point of order.

The bill was ordered to be read a third time; Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois. Let us and it was accordingly read the third time, and have the question stated.

passed.
The SPEAKER. The Chair will state the Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, moved
condition of the bill. When it was reported to reconsider the vote by which the bill was
the gentleman from Missouri made the point passed; and also moved that the motion to
of order that it contained an appropriation and reconsider be laid on the table.
must have its first consideration in the Com- The latter motion was agreed to.
mittee of the Whole House. The gentleman

ABEDNEGO B. ROWDEN.
from Massachusetts moved at the same time.
that it be referred to the Committee on Appro-

Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, from priations. The gentleman from Missouri ihen the same committee, reported a bill (H. R. No. withdrew his point of order, and the gentleman

1319) for the relief of Abednego B. Rowden, from Massachusetts stated that he intended his

late second lieutenant eleventh Tennessee motion to cover the point of order. The Chair cavalry; which was read a first and second thereupon entertained the point of order.

time.

The bill directs that there be paid to the Mr, WASHBURN, of Massachusetts. I submit to the House wbether these bills should all || applicant the pay of second lieutenant from go to the Committee of the Whole.

August 31, 1863, to December 5, 1864, deductMr. COBB. I rise to a point of order. The || ing such sum as may have been paid him in a gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Wash

lower grade of military service for that period, BURN] was on the floor. Of course the gentle.

he having performed the service after promoman from Missouri (Mr. BENJAMIN] could make

tion, but, having been captured in the line of his point of order, but the gentleman from Mas

duty and imprisoned, he failed to be mussachusetts (Mr. WASHBURN) did not yield to his

tered in. colleague to make the motion to refer to the Mr. GARFIELD. I would like to ask the Committee on Appropriations.

gentleinan whether the general bill which was The SPEAKER. The Chair overrules the reported from the Committee on Military Affairs point of order on the ground that when the the other day and printed will not cover this point of order is made that a bill contains an case ? appropriation it is in order for any member to Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts. Well, move its reference to any other committee than Mr. Speaker, I do not know, I will state to the Committee of the Whole. That motion the House the action of the Committee of was made by the gentleman from Massachu- Claims on this case, and another which we have

The only doubt the Chair has is whether like it, and if it is covered by the general bill that motion to refer to the Committee on Ap- referred to by the gentleman we shall not ask propriations should not stand instead of the its passage. It is a case in which an officer of objection to its consideration in the House. the Army was cominissioned to a higher rank,

Mr. COBB. I am satisfied with the ruling, and his commission was sent to him, but before but

he was mustered in under that commission to The SPEAKER. The Chair will rule that the higher rank he was taken prisoner and lay the gentleman from Massachusetts, having in a rebel prison for several months. He was made a motion to refer to the Coin mittee on afterward released and returned to his regiAppropriations, that motion must stand; and inent and was mustered in, dating from the if rejected, the point of order comes too late. time he returned. Under these circunstances

Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts. Let the committee thought it was not fair that me say that the Committee of Claims have no because of his misfortune in being taken pris. particular interest in this matter. The com- oner be should lose his pay for the rank which mittee have spent considerable time in examin- he would have filled if he had not been taken ing this bill, which has passed the Senate by prisoner. the unanimous recommendation of the Com- Mr. GARFIELD. If the gentleman will mittee of Claims there, and have reported it to allow me, I will state in a few sentences the the House without a dissenting voice. Now, I provisions of the general bill which the Comif it is the desire of the House to refer all the mittee on Military Affairs have prepared and bills that the Committee of Claims have are only waiting to be called to report, and the reported to the Committee on Appropriations, | gentleman can see if it covers this case. then I have nothing to do but to submit. Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts. Well, But there is no reason why this bill should be if there is no objection to this bill, let it pass. referred any more than others that we have Mr. GARFIELD. I will say that there are examined, and unless there is some special || fifty or sixty of these cases before the Com. reason given for its reference I trust it will not mittee on Military Affairs, and we concluded be referred. I would like to hear my colleague to draw upa general bill very carefully to cover state any reason he may have for its reference. such cases as ought to be covered rather than Mr. BÚTLER, of Massachusetts. The reason to pass special biils.

We have drawn up a bill why I named the Committee on Appropriations to this effect: that a commission shall be conwas that the bill contains an appropriation of sidered to have been received when it reached money. I do not desire to make any opposition the headquarters of the regiment or corps in to it. The Committee on Appropriations can which he was serving, and if he was on the report at any time, whereas the bill might be duty of the rank to which he was commissioned lost if it is referred to the Committee of the at the time the commission was received ani! Whole.

was captured and taken away he shall be Mr. BLAINE. The Committee on Appro- || mustered in as of the date when the commispriations can report at any time only for ref- sion was received at headquarters. I think erence, not for action.

that perfectly covers these cases, and I hope Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois. They can- the gentleman will let this bill lie over until not report private bills at any time.

action can be had on the general bill. Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts. I Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts.

I only wish to state that the reason my colleague will ask that the bill be recommitted to the assigns applies to every bill reported from our Committee of Clains, with the privilege of committee. I do not know that there is a bill | reporting it back at any time. that we report which does not contain a greater Mr. GARFIELD. I hope that will be done,

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Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, from
the same committee, reported back adversely
Senate bill No. 151, for the relief of Gold-
smith Brothers, of the cities of San Francisco,
California, and Portland, Oregon, brokers;
and the same was laid on the table.

Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois, moved to
reconsider the vote by which the bill was laid
on the table; and also moved that the motion
to reconsider be laid on the table.
The latter motion was agreed to.

JAMES HOOPER.
Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, from
the same committee, reported back Senate bill
No. 436, for the relief of James Hooper, with
the recommendation that it do pass.

The bill was read. It directs the Secretary
of the Treasury to pay to James Hooper the
som of $16,000, being the value of his vessel,
the bark General Berry, which was captured
and destroyed at sea on the 9th day of July,
1864, while in the military service of the Uni-
ted States, by the rebel steamer Florida.
*Mr. HOLMAN. That bill should go to the
Committee of the Whole House, as it makes
an appropriation. I think it should have its
first consideration in Committee of the Whole.

The SPEAKER, The gentleman makes the
point of order that this bill, makng an appro-
priation, it must have its first consideration in
Committee of the Whole. The Chair sustains
the point of order. It will, therefore, be re-
ferred to the Coinmittee of the Whole House
on the Private Calendar.

ALDERT GRANT.
Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, from
the same committee, reported back Senate bill
No. 367, for the relief of Albert Grant, with
the recommendation that it do pass.

The bill was read. It appropriates $30,000
to Albert Grant, in full satisfaction of all de-
mands against the United States on account
of the construction of buildings numbered
twenty-nine, thirty, and thirty-one, at the Nor-
folk navy-yard, by Albert Grant and H. A.
Pierce, who were partners, doing business
under the name and style of A. Grant & Co.

Mr. BENJAMIN. That makes an appropriation, and should have its first consideration in the Committee of the Whole House.

The SPEAKER. It does make an appropriation, and it insisted on must go to the Committee of the Whole.

Mr. BUTLER, of Massachusetts. I move that it be referred to the Committee on Appro. priations.

Mr. ÇOBB. I do not see why it should be referred to that committee.

40TH Cong. 20 SESS.--No. 223.

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and then if our bill does not cover this case officers of the Treasury to allow and place to

that the motion to reconsider be laid on the same cap the gentleman can report the bill back. the credit of Charles N. Goulding, late cap.

table. There was no objection; and the bill was tain and assistant quartermaster, in the final The latter motion was agreed to. recommitted to the Committee of Claims, with settlement of his accounts as such officer, such

GEORGE D. BLAKEY. leave to report it back at any time.

amounts and sums as he shall satisfactorily Mr. HOLMAN. I have a bill of the same prove to have been captured, either in money

Mr. COBB, from the Committee of Claims,

boca coa character for the relief of Charles C. McCreary. or vouchers, by the enemy in the month of reported a joint resolution (H. R. No. 314) for I ask that it be placed on the same footing. August, 1862, while on duty in the army of

the relief of George D. Blakey, late collector
of the second district of Kentucky; which was

that he w There was no objection, and leave was given || Virginia, under Major General John Pope;

is 'a gite to the committee to report the bill at any time. provided that no greater amount for losses | read a first and second time. shall so be passed to his credit than the bal

The joint resolution authorizes and directs
MERCHANT AND ROSECRANZ.

ance now appearing against him on the books the Secretary of the Treasury to credit George Mr. WASHBURN, of Massachusetts, from of the Government.

D. Blakey, late collector of internal revenue the Committee of Claims, reported a bill (H. Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois. I hope the || for the second district of Kentucky, with such R. No. 1320) for the relief of L. Merchant & report will be read. gums of money, not exceeding $1,445, as shall

aken. Co. and Peter Rosecranz; which was read a

Mr. COBB. There is no report in this case.

appear from evidence to be submitted to the first and second time. Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois, I hope proper accounting officers to have been taken

Lg been The bill was read. It proposes to direct the the gentleman will make some explanation of

by robbery by armed bands of rebel guerrillas Secretary of the Treasury to pay to Leander this bill.

from Elias Dunbar and Dory Nell, deputy col

Mr. Merchant, of the firm of L. Merchant & Co., Mr. COBB. I will state for the information | leetors for Blakey in the counties of Russell

Hential the sum of $109,412 81 for certain cotton, the of gentleman from Illinois [Mr. WASH- || and Monroe, in the months of February and property of said firm, taken erroneously and without due authority by agents of the United

BURNE) and of the House, that this gentleman, April, 1865.
Charles N. Goulding, was first chief quarter:

The joint resolution was ordered to be
States, the civil and military authorities at
master under General Rosecrans; then chief

engrossed and read a third time; and being Mobile, Alabama, in the month of April, 1865, quartermaster under General Frémont, and | engrossed, it was accordingly read the third

ifror shipped to New York, sold by the United States, and the proceeds thereof paid into the Pope. During the time he was serving in these afterward chief quartermaster under General time, and passed.

Mr. COBB moved to reconsider the vote by The c Treasury, the charges and expenses of the several capacities he paid out, under compe

which the joint resolution was passed; and United States having been deducted therefrom. tent authority, for the purchase of forage,

also moved that the motion to reconsider be It proposes further to direct the Secretary of

horses, &c., $108,162 44, for which he took the laid on the table. the Treasury to pay Peter Rosecranz the sum

proper and necessary vouchers. He had these The latter motion was agreed to. of $39,253 10, the proceeds of the sale of vouchers with him in his safe on the 22d of forty-one bales of cotton, the private property | August, 1862, at Catlett's Station, Virginia, of said Rosecranz, taken, sold, and appropri- ) when the headquarter's train, including the

Mr. BAKER, by unanimous consent, introated at the same time and place and in the quartermaster himself, his safe, and all the prop

duced a bill (H. R, No. 1321) granting a pensame manner, the charges and expenses of erty, public and private, in the safe, was cap

sion to Mrs. Susan Carson; which was read a the United States having likewise been deducted tured by the rebel General Stuart. In the safe,

first and second time, and referred, with the therefrom. besides the vouchers for the amount I have

accompanying papers, to the Committee on Mr. BENJAMIN. I make the point of order || named, were Government funds to the amount

Invalid Pensions. on that bill that it makes an appropriation. of $4,844 57. These vouchers were for prop

MAJOR F. F. STEVENS. The SPEAKER. The bill contains an

erty for which money was paid, the property appropriation, and must have its first consider

Mr. HARDING, from the Committee of having been turned over to other officers, and ation in Committee of the Whole House.

Claims, reported a bill (H. R. No. 1322) for has been accounted for in their returns. The bill was referred to a Committee of the

the relief of Major F. F. Stevens, assistant

Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois. Does this Whole House, and ordered to be printed. bill include the $4,000 in money?

paymaster United States Army, Wisconsin

volunteers; which was read a first and second RELIEF OF GOVERNMENT CONTRACTORS. Mr. COBB. It was in his safe, and was taken time. Mr. WASHBURN of Masaechusetts, from the

out by the rebel Stuart, as is fully proved by The bill provides that the proper accounting Committee of Ciaims, also reported back, with witnesses.

officers of the Paymaster General's office and a recommendation that the same do pass, Senate

Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois. Is not that the Treasury Department, in the settlement of bill No. 307, for the relief of certain Govern

establishing the principle of paying for money the accounts of Major F. F. Stevens, late an ment contractors, captured by the rebels ?

assistant paymaster of the United States Army, The bill was read at length.

Mr. COBB. I do not know that that ques. credit him with $3,078 63, as of the 1st of Mr. MAYNARD. I raise the point of order

tion was ever raised where proof of the cap- April, 1867, that amount of money being in that this is an appropriation bill, and must, ture was clear and conclusive.

his hands on that day and lost by the burning under the rule, receive its first consideration in

Mr. PAINE. I do not understand that this of the steamer Alabama on the Mississippi Committee of the Whole. money was the private property of the officer.

river; provided that in the opinion of thə Mr. WASHBURN of Massachusetts. I wish

Mr. COBB. By no means; it was Govern- accounting officers the allowance should be the gentleman would withdraw his point of ment funds.

made. order for a moment until I can make a state

Mr. PAINE. Then it does not come under The bill was ordered to be engrossed and ment in regard to this bill.

the objection made by the gentleman from Illi- read a third time; and being engrossed, it was Mr. MAYNARD. I am perfectly willing that nois, (Mr. WASHBURNE.]

accordingly read the third time, and passed. the gentleman should make his statement; but

Mr. COBB. These charges are made to the Mr. HARDING moved to reconsider the I would suggest to him that he will be merely debit of this officer on the books of the Gov

vote by which the bill was passed; and also consuming so much of his morning hour.

ernment. In addition to these vouchers there moved that the motion to reconsider be laid Mr. VAN WYCK. I will renew the point was captured a large amount of Goveroment

on the table. of order, no matter what explanation may be

property, for which this officer was responsible. The latter motion was agreed to. made.

The Department has allowed for the GovernMr. WASHBURN of Massachusetts. The ment property, but the money and money

WALTER D. PLOWDEN. House will understand that if this bill is revouchers cannot be allowed.

Mr. HARDING, from the Committee of ferred to the Committee of the Whole it will

Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois. I am sorry Claims, reported a bill (H. R. No. 1323) for be laid up for this session, as it is not likely that

the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. COBB] has the relief of Walter D. Plowden; which was it can be reached.

not put his explanation in the shape of a report read a first and second time. Mr. VAN WYCK. I think it ought to be

to go upon the records of the House. I think The bill directs the proper officers of the laid for this session ; I think that would be

in all these cases there should be a written up

War and Treasury Departments to allow and the proper disposition of it.

report setting out fully the principle upon pay to Walter D. Plowden $1,000 for services Mr. MAYNARD. There is but little on the which the claims are allowed.

as a scout spy, and in consideration of his Private Calendar, and we can soon dispose

Mr. COBB. I assure the gentleman that the long confinement in rebel prisons for being a of the matters there.

Committee of Claims are not inclined to be Union man. The bill was accordingly referred to the very liberal in allowing claims.

Mr. HOLMAN. I suggest that the bill be Committee of the Whole on the Private Cal. Mr. WASHBURNE, of Illinois. It is un- modified by striking out the words "proper endar, and ordered to be printed.

necessary for me to say that I have the utmost officers of the War and Treasury Departments”

confidence in the Committee of Claims; but I CHARLES N. GOULDING.

and inserting "Secretary of the Treasury." think the suggestion I make is one worthy of Mr. HARDING. I have no objection to Mr. COBB, from the Committee of Claims, being entertained by that committee.

that. I yield for three minutes to the gentle. reported back Senate bill No. 251, for the Mr. COBB. I have no doubt it will be con- man from Tennessee. relief of Charles N. Goulding, late quarter- ) sidered by them.

Mr. HAWKINS. An examination of this master of volunteers, with a recommendation The bill was ordered to be engrossod and case reveals this state of facts: this man went that the same do pass.

read a third time; and being engrossed, it was into the Army, not into the service of the UniThe question was upon ordering the bill to

accordingly read the third time, and passed. ted States, but as the servant of an officer, aud, be read a third time,

Mr. COBB moved to reconsider the vote The bill authorizes the proper accounting by which the bill was passed; and also moved

after remaining in the service of that officer for some time, and with other officers in the

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