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MS. but we the rest, although baptized, and born

again in Christ, yet we all offend. Pr. but all we the rest, although baptized, and if

born in Christ, yet offend.

Art. De Blasphemia in Sp. Sanct. non est in MS. Art. 16. MS. wherefore the place for penitence.

Pr. wherefore the grant of repentance. Art. 17. MS. so excellent a benefit of God given unto them,

be called according. Pr. so excellent a benefit of God, be called accord

ing. MS. as because it doth fervently kindle their love. Pr. as because it doth frequently kindle their love.

Art. Omnes obligantur, &c. non est in MS. Art. 18. MS. to frame his life according to the law and the

light of nature. Pr. to frame his life according to that law, and the

light of nature. Art. 19. MS. congregation of faithfvl men in the which the

pure Word. Pr. congregation of faithful men in which the pure

Word. Art. 20. MS. the church hath power to decree rites or ce

remonies, and authority in controversies of

faith. And yet.
These words are not in the original MS.
MS. ought it not to enforce any thing.

Pr. it ought not to enforce any thing.
A 4.21. MS. and when they be gathered together (foras-

much.

Pr. and when they be gathered (forasmuch.
Art. 22. MS. is a fond thing vainly invented.

Pr. is a fond thing vainly feigned.
Art. 24. MS. in a tongue not understanded of the people.

Pr. in a tongue not understood of the people.
Art. 25. MS. and effectual signs of grace and God's good-

will towards us.
Pr. and effectual signs of grace and God's will to-

wards us.
MS. and extream annoyling.

Pr. and extream unction.
Art. 26. MS. in their own name, but do minister by Christ's

commission and authority. Pr. in their own name, but in Christ's, and do

minister by his commission and authority.

MS. and in the receiving of the Sacraments.
Pr. and in the receiving the Sacraments.
MS. and rightly receive the Sacraments.

Pr. and rightly do receive the Sacraments.
Art. 27. MS. from others that be not christned, but is also a

sign.
Pr. from others that be not christned, but it is also

a sign.
MS. forgiveness of sin, and of our adoption.

Pr. forgiveness of sin, of our adoption.
Art. 28. MS. to have amongst themselves.

Pr. to have among themselves. partaking
MS. the bread which we break is a communion of

the body of Christ.
Pr. the bread which we break is a partaking of the
body of Christ.

partaking MS. and likewise the cup of blessing is a commu

nion of the blood of Christ. Pr. and likewise the cup of blessing is a partaking of

the blood of Christ. MS. or the change of the substance of bread and

wine into the substance of Christ's body and blood cannot be proved by holy writ, but is

repugnant. Pr. or the change of the substance of bread and wine

in the supper of the Lord cannot be proved by

holy writ, but it is repugnant. MS. but the mean whereby the body of Christ is

received.
Pr. and the mean whereby the body of Christ is re-

ceived.
MS. lifted up or worshipped.

Pr. lifted up and worshipped.
Art. 31. MS. is the perfect redemption.

Pr. is that perfect redemption.
MS. to have remission of pain or guilt were forged

fables.
Pr. to have remission of pain and guilt were blas-

phemous fables. Art. 33. MS. that hath authority thereto.

Pr. that hath authority thereunto. Art. 34. MS. diversity of countries, times, and men's man

ners.

Pr. diversity of countries and men's manners.
MS. and be ordained and appointed by common

authority.
Pr. and be ordained and approved by common au-

thority.
MS. the consciences of the weak brethren.
Pr. the consciences of weak brethren.

Art. 35. MS. of homilies, the titles whereof we have joined

under this article, do contain. Pr. Of homilies, the several titles whereof we have

joined under this article, doth contain MS. wholesome doctrine, and necessary for this

time, as doth the former book which was

set forth. Pr. wholesome doctrine, necessary for these times, as

doth the former book of homilies which were

set forth. MS. and therefore are to be read in our churches

by the ministers, diligently, plainly, and distinctly, that they may be understanded of

the people. Pr. and therefore we judge them to be read in

churches by the ministers, diligently and dis-
tinctly, that they may be understood of the

people.
MS. ministred in a tongue known.
Pr. ministred in a known tongue.

Art. De Libro Precationum, &c. non est in MS.

Art. 36. MS. in the time of the most noble K. Edward the

Sixth.
Pr. in the time of Edward the Sixth.
MS. superstitious or ungodly.

Pr. superstitious and ungodly.
Art. 37. MS. whether they be ecclesiastical or not.

Pr. whether they be ecclesiastical or civil.
MS. the minds of some slanderous folks to be of-

fended.
Pr. The minds of some dangerous folks to be of-

fended.
MS. we give not to our princes.
Pr. we give not our princes.
MS. or of sacraments.
Pr. or of the sacraments.
MS. the injunctions also lately set forth.
Pr. the injunctions also set forth.
MS. and serve in the wars.

Pr. and serve in lawful wars.
Art. 38. MS. every man oughteth of such things.

Pr. every man ought of such things.

Art. 39. Edw. VI. et qui sequuntur, non sunt in MS.

We th' archbishops and bishops of either province of this realm of England, lawfully gathered together in this provincial synod holden at London, with continuations and prorogations of the

same, do receive, profess and acknowledge the xxxviii Articles before written in xix pages going before, to contain true and sound doctrine, and do approve and ratify the same by the subscription of our hands the with day of May in the year of our Lord 1571, and in the year of the reign of our sovereign lady Elizabeth by the grace of God of England, France, and Ireland, queen, defender of the faith, &c. the thirteenth.

Matthue Cantuar.
Rob. Winton.
Jo. Heref.
Richarde Ely.
Nic. Wigorn.
Jo. Sarisburien.
Edm. Roffen.

N. Bangor.
Ri. Cicestren.
Thom. Lincoln.
Wilhelmus Exon.

From these diversities a great difficulty will naturally arise about this whole matter. The manuscripts of Corpus Christi are without doubt originals.

The hands of the subscribers are well known; they belonged to archbishop Parker, and were left by him to that college, and they are signed with a particular care ; for at the end of them there is not only a sum of the number of the pages, but of the lines in every page. And though this was the work only of the convocation of the province of Canterbury; yet the archbishop of York, with the bishops of Duresme and Chester, subscribed them likewise, and they were also subscribed by the whole lower house. But we are not sure that the like care was used in the convocation, anno 1571; for the Articles are only subscribed by the archbishop of Canterbury, and ten bishops of his province; nor does the subscription of the lower house appear. These Articles were first printed in the year 1563, conform to the present impressions which are still in use among us. So the alterations were then made while the thing was fresh and well known, therefore no fraud nor artifice is to be suspected, since some objections would have been then made, especially by the great party of the complying papists, who then continued in the church : they would not have failed to have made much use of this, and to have taken great advantages from it, if there had been any occasion or colour for it; and yet nothing of this kind was then done.

One alteration of more importance was made in the year 1571. Those words of the 20th Article, The church hath power to decree rites or ceremonies, and authority in controversies of faith, were left out both in the manuscripts, and in the printed editions, but were afterwards restored according to the Articles printed anno 1563. I cannot find out in what year they were again put in the printed copies. They appear in two several impressions in queen Elizabeth's time, which are in my hands; it passes commonly that it was done by archbishop Laud; and

affirmed in the star-self of that, -as church by things, that he

his enemies laid this upon him among other things, that he ART. had corrupted the doctrine of this church by this addition; 1.. but he cleared himself of that, as well he might, and, in a speech in the star-chamber, appealed to the original, and affirmed these words were in it.

The true account of this difficulty is this. When the Articles were first settled, they were subscribed by both houses upon paper; but, that being done, they were afterward ingrossed in parchment, and made up in form to remain as records. Now, in all such bodies, many alterations are often made after a minute or first draught is agreed on, before the matter is brought to full perfection; so these alterations, as most of them are small and inconsiderable, were made between the time that they were first subscribed, and the last voting of them. But the original records, which, if extant, would have cleared the whole matter, having been burnt in the fire of London, it is not possible to appeal to them; yet what has been proposed may serve, I hope, fully to clear the difficulty.

I now go to consider the Articles themselves.

ARTICLE I.

Of Faith in the Holy Trinity.

There is but one living and true God, everlasting, without bodic,

parts or passions, of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness, the maker and preserber of all things both visible and invisible; and in the unity of this Bodhead there be three Persons of one substance, power, and eternity, the Father, the Son, and the Poly Ghost.

THE natural order of things required, that the first of all articles in religion should be concerning the being and attributes of God: for all other doctrines arise out of this. But the title appropriates this to the holy Trinity; because that is the only part of the Article which peculiarly belongs to the Christian religion; since the rest is founded on the principles of natural religion.

There are six heads to be treated of, in order to the full opening of all that is contained in this Article.

1. That there is a God.
2. That there is but one God.

3. Negatively, That this God hath neither body, parts, nor passions.

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