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Street chapel rooms, Manchsia Test:... Esse sise
held on Thursday, Jan. 18, at the 10 mesecake

Trustees present in the course si se

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INTELLIGENCE

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MANCHESTER SET COLLIEZ.
The annual meeting of Trustees vas

chair was taken by the Press M. James Heywood, M.P. Amosas, se day were Mr. Mark Phips M.RS.

Booth, M:. Grimsbar, Rer. W. Gas

9.2lash speak 3:40.
Philips Mr. R. I. Grez,

L32 Sirp
Grunds
, Mr. R. P. Grez, Mr. RD ***TEREST e meu pronal

oce o to Cebers of the Comitee,
kell, Rev. John Cropper, Res.

doba i by the stern and of frezis of the
Wright, Rev. J. H. Huttos, Res. H. ze in timputa af te kiezium,
Green, Rev. T. E. Poyatinz, &c. The the taai w of the Insalut ja
Treasuret's report was read by Ms. Las vrea very great iz prord, en d
Aspden, and shewed an excess of income withstanding the larat e spenditure ren-
fabout £70) over expenditure, notwith. dered necessary by the rea ni chanzes, the
standing the addition during the years income not exceeds the expenditure.
of about £400 to the permanent fund,

And although the Committee espect
The Treasurer, Mr. R. N. Philips, con- that an increase of students on the
gratulated the Trustees on the prosper. foundation (absolately necessary if tho-
ous financial condition of the College. ronghly edncated candidates for the min-
The expenses of the removal to London istry are to be hereafter supplied in num-
had fallen short of the estimate. The bers at all proportioned to our vacant
cost of the Chancery suit had been less pulpits) will in future years occasiou
than the sum provided by the generous a still larger expenditure, they are enabled
zeal of the friends of the College, and from past experience

to entertain a cheer-
the balance was added to the general ful confidence that the necessary funds
fund. The subscription-list had been will be supplied. In order to provide for
doubled. All this had involved much the growing wants of the College, and to
watehfulness and exertion. By the make good the casualties which are con-
same exertions hereafter, he did not stantly affecting the subscription-list, it is
doubt that the College would be desirable that personal applications should
well upheld. He paid a warm compli- be made from time to time to the members
ment to Mr. Field and other friends of of our several congregations.
the College in London, who had so In overcoming the other difficulties of
largely added to the number of the the past year, the chief labour has de-
London Trustees. The Treasurer's re- volved on the Principal, the Rev. Johu
port was passed with many expressions James Tayler, and the Professor of Theo-
of satisfaction from the Trustees. The logy, the Rev. George Vance Smith. To
officers for the ensuing year were elect- both these gentlemen the Committee foel
ed, the new members of the Committee it to be an act of simple justice to express
being Res. John Cropper, Mr. Martin the warmest gratitude for their untiring
Schunck and Mr. E. Crompton Potter, zeal and assiduity, and the great ability
and Mr. R. D. Darbishire was elected with which they have discharged their
one of the Secretaries. The Committee's important duties. To them it is mainly
address was read by Rev. R. Brook owing that “ the first year's results of this
Aspland, and was as follows:

great experiment have proved satisfaoThe Committee are enabled to meet the tory." At the same time, the Committee Trustees on the present oceasion with an desire to add their own to the grateful expression of congratulation on the suc- acknowledgments publicly made by their cess of the College during the past year, Principal to the friends in University Hall and of the hope of its future and increased and in London, for the kind welcome and se falnesss.

the cordial sympathy which they have The last session---the first after the extended to the College on its establishrence of our Institution to a new ment in the Metropolis. was" (to use the language of our The annual examination, beld in June "rincipal) " one of much anxi- last, for

the first time in University Hall, ful responsibility to all who was well attended by Trustees from all

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to a doctrine on which those who aspire to rule this movement stake their religious reputation.

“ This would not be a satisfactory state of things, if the persons to whom I am referring were prepared honestly to act up to the principle of their own doctrine. It would be but a small consolation to those who suffered injury by that doctrine, to know that they were made the victims of men blindly ignorant of the claims of Christianity and common sense to which they had placed themselves in antagonism. But the conduct of these men is distinguished by anything rather than by its honesty. They are not blind to the claims of the contrary side of the question whenever those claims have to do with their own interests. They can and do make every exception to their professed law which those interests prescribe ; and, in this very instance, they put upon the class whom they come forward to defend, a yoke which they will not allow to be put upon their own shoulders.

“ It is beyond controversy that they, as a party, have been the great oppressors of the cabmen on this point of Sunday hiring. Driving to church has been the chief occasion of that hiring. Of this the cabmen have formally complained: and this is peculiarly the case in Edinburgh, where Sunday cabhiring is almost confined to church-goers. I say nothing of the hypocritical practices that have been described to us, of slipping religious tracts into the cabmen's hands, and advising them to hasten to church, after paying them for breaking the Sabbath. The plain fact that the breach of the Sabbath, in their sense of it, has been habitually committed, and imposed by this party, is enough for me, without any additional colouring of that kind.

“Now it is no excuse that members of this party express repentance for their sin. That does not touch the point I moot. My point is, that, in its bearing upon themselves, their act was no sin. They were not conscious of it as sin. They committed it, in the belief that they were justified in so doing, Their sin lies elsewhere. It consists in their pretending that what they permitted in their own persons, ought to be forbidden to their neighbours-in their upholding as a Divine Law for society, that which they did not themselves keep as a law at all. That was their sin in past time,—and that sin is perpetuated in their present attempt to subject these cabmen, under pains and penalties of religious reprobation here and hereafter, to a strictness of obedience in which they did not possess, and do not now possess, any conscientious belief." The Sunday School Penny Magazine. Published by the Manchester Dis

trict Sunday-School Association. New Series. Vol. IV. LondonE. T. Whitfield.

This sound, vigorous and useful little publication, which still enjoys the benefit of the editorship of the Rev. John Wright, of Bury, continues to deserve well of all interested in Sunday-schools. It is plain, practical and eminently religious. We regret to find that the support it receives is less than it ought to be. Is the diminution of subscribers at all connected with the recent establishment of a separate periodical for Teachers? We Unitarians weaken our resources by excessive subdivision. But, whatever the cause, we hope that the evil will be remedied at once. It would be deplorable if this little Magazine, so welcome to our best Sunday scholars, had to be given up. The Unitarian Almanac for 1855. Edited by John Webb, Resident

Secretary to the British and Foreign Unitarian Association. MR. WEBB has introduced several improvements into this useful Almanac, and has edited it with great care. It now well deserves the support of the denomination for whom it has been compiled.

INTELLIGENCE.

MANCHESTER NEW COLLEGE. were engaged in conducting it, and at. The annual meeting of Trustees was tended with difficulties and embarrass. held on Thursday, Jan. 18, at the Cross. ments, inseparable from the introduction Street chapel rooms, Manchester. The of so great a change, which none but those chair was taken by the President, Mr. who actually encountered them can ade. James Heywood, M.P. Amongst the qnately appreciate." In their address last Trustees present in the course of the year, the Committee had to speak of finan. day were Mr. Mark Philips, Mr. R. N. cial dificulties and an excess of expendi. Philips, Mr. R. H. Greg, Mr. John ture over income. Now it is their pleasing Grundy, Mr. R. P. Greg, Mr. R, D, duty to report that, by the grent personal Darbishire, Mr. Eddowes Bowman, Mr. exertions of their Trensurer, assisted by Booth, Mr. Grimshaw, Rev. W. Gas- one or two members of the Committee, kell, Rev. John Cropper, Rev. John and by the liberal aid of friends of the Wright, Rev. J. H. Hutton, Rev. H. College in various parts of the kingdom, Green, Rev, T. E. Poynting, &c. The the financial condition of the Institution Treasurer's report was read by Mr. has been very greatly improved, and, notAspden, and shewed an excess of income withstanding the large expenditure ren. (about £70) over expenditure, notwith- dered necessary by the recent changes, the standing the addition during the year income now exceeds the expenditure. of about £400 to the permanent fund, And although the Committee expect The Treasurer, Mr. R. N. Philips, con- that an increase of students on the gratulated the Trustees on the prosper- fouudation (absolutely necessary if tho. ous financial condition of the College. roughly educated candidates for the min. The expenses of the removal to London istry are to be hereafter supplied in numhad fallen short of the estimate. The bers at all proportioned to our vacant cost of the Chancery suit had been less pulpits) will in future years occasion than the sum provided by the generous a still larger expenditure, they are enabled zeal of the friends of the College, and from past experience to entertain a cheerthe balance was added to the general ful confidence that the necessary funds fund. The subscription-list had been will be supplied. In order to provide for doubled. All this had involved much the growing wants of the College, and to watchfulness and exertion. By the make good the casualties which are consame exertions hereafter, he did not stantly affecting the subscription-list, it is doubt that the College would be desirable that personal applications should well upheld. He paid a warm compli- be made from time to time to the members ment to Mr. Field and other friends of of our several congregations. the College in London, who had so In overcoming the other difficulties of largely added to the number of the the past year, the chief labour has deLondon Trustees. The Treasurer's re- volved on the Principal, the Rev. John port was passed with many expressions James Tayler, and the Professor of Theoof satisfaction from the Trustees. The logy, the Rev. George Vance Smith. To officers for the ensuing year were elect- both these gentlemen the Committee feel ed, the new members of the Committee it to be an act of simple justice to express being Rev, John Cropper, Mr. Martin the warmest gratitude for their untiring Schunck and Mr. E. Crompton Potter, zeal and assiduity, and the great ability and Mr. R. D. Darbishire was elected with which they have discharged their one of the Secretaries. The Committee's important duties. To them it is mainly address was read by Rev. R. Brook owing that “the first year's results of this Aspland, and was as follows:

great experiment have proved satisfacThe Committee are enabled to meet the tory." At the same time, the Committee Trustees ou the present occasion with an desire to add their own to the grateful expression of congratulation on the suc. acknowledgments publicly made by their cess of the College during the past year, Principal to the friends in University Hall and of the hope of its future and increased and in London, for the kind welcome and usefulnesss.

the cordial sympathy which they have “ The last session, the first after the extended to the College on its establish. transference of our Institution to a new ment in the Metropolis. locality-was" (to use the language of our The annual examination, beld in June excellent Principal) "one of much anxi- last, for the first time in University Hall, ely and painful responsibility to all who was well attended by Trustees from all parts of the kingdom. “In the opinion of the College, for the establishment and of competent and impartial judges, it gave support of a chair of Ethical Philosophy. evidence of successful industry and pro The Committee have been in corre. mising ability." It is hoped that the spondence with Mr. Ainsworth respeeting annual examinations will be made in the continuance of the scholarship forfuture still more attractive, by the addition merly offered by him to the Gold Medalist of Classics and Mathematics to the other at the examination for the Master's degree departments of study in which last year in Classics, Science or Philosophy. It is the examination was made. During the with great satisfaction that they are enasession the undergraduate students are bled to report that Mr. Ainsworth, in the examined in these two important branches continued exercise of the enlightened and of study by Mr. J. C. Addyes Scott and munificent zeal of which the Institution Mr. Richard Hutton. In a recent report has had repeated proofs, consents to conreceived by the Committee, Mr. Scott, the tinue the scholarship on certain condiClassical examiner, states that the Christ- tions, which it will be the duty of the mas examination may be considered a Committee from time to time to make very satisfactory one as regards all the public. students. The report of the Mathematical The Committee have received a gratifyexaminer is less satisfactory. From the ing proof of the growing liberality of the Secretary of University College, the Prin- age, in the offer, which they have gratecipal has continued to receive very satis. fully accepted, from Mr. Vowler, a member factory reports respecting the attendance of the Fishmongers' Company, London, of the students at the classes, and the to nominate one of the pupils of Manpreparation of the prescribed exercises. chester New College now studying at Uni

The Committee express their regret versity College, to a bursary of £20 for that, owing to purely accidental circum- three years, which until lately was constances, the number of their students who fined to students at the Universities of have during the past year gone up for Oxford and Cambridge. degrees in the University of London, is The Committee will not, it is hoped, be below the average of former years. The thought to exceed their duty, if they pub. Trustees may feel assured that no exertion licly express their good will to an instituwill be spared by the conductors of this tion recently created in Manchester by Institution to uphold its literary and sci- some of their friends, for the training of entific rank. Never, in their estimation, domestic missionaries and of ministers did a greater necessity exist for providing designed for the smaller congregations of for the pulpits of the English Presbyterian the English Dissenters. If such an instiand Unitarian Dissenters, men who to tution is worked out in a spirit of fidelity, theological learning shall add the general it cannot fail to be higlily useful, and can attainments of the scholar, and the man in no important particular come into colwers and feelings of the gentleman. lision with the College. That it is not

It will be in the recollection of the started in hostile rivalry is evidenced by Trustees that the arrangement made last the fact, that some of the conductors and session with Rev. James Martineau as principal officers of the new society are lecturer in Mental and Moral Philosophy, old and zealous friends and officers of the was only temporary and experimental. College. The result of the experiment, indicated by The agitation in Parliament during the the attendance on the classes and the last year of the subject of University Reproficiency exhibited by the students at form, was watched by the Oommittee with the annual examination, induced the Com- deep interest. They prepared and formittee to offer to Mr. Martineau a perma- warded petitions, signed by nearly all the nent engagement. The Committee at the officers of the College, praying for the same time preferred the request that he opening of the Universities to all classes would add to the lectures on Mental and of Her Majesty's subjects, without regard Moral Philosophy, a course on Political to their religious opinions. The subse. Economy. The Committee are happy to quent passing through Parliament of an report that, in accepting the appointment, Act which in a great measure opens the Mr. Martineau expressed his willingness instruction and honours of the University to provide a course of lectures on Political of Oxford to all classes, is one of those Economy hereafter, when a class shall be favourable and significant signs of the formed to attend it. It is right to add times, which the steady supporters of that, in making this important engage. Manchester New College, whose principle ment, the Committee felt that they might and watch word has always been, Educarely on the continuance of the subscrip. tion without religious tests, will mark tions so liberally offered by certain friends with gratitude, and receive as an encou

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