The Life of John, Duke of Marlborough: With Some Account of His Contemporaries and of the War of the Succession, Tom 2

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William Blackwood and Sons, 1852
 

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Death of the Prince of Denmark
9
Deplorable situation of the French monarch
10
Great concessions offered by Louis
11
Counter proposals of the Allies
12
35
17
41
19
46
22
ib 47
24
51
28
1
29
Siege and capture of that town
30
Siege of the citadel and its desperate chances
31
Alarms of the troops at the subterraneous warfare
32
Its real horrors 34 But the citadel is at length taken
34
Vigorous movements of Marlborough towards Mons
35
Positions taken by Marlborough after the lines were passed
36
He turns Villars lines and gets between them and France
37
Concentration of the Allied and of Villars armies
38
Composition and strength of the French army
39
Description of the field of Malplaquet
40
Noble force on both sides
41
Preparatory movements on both sides and interference of the Dutch deputies
42
Opinions of Marlborough and Eugene in the council of war
43
Result of these deliberations 45 Villars fortifies his position 46 Plan of attack by the Allied generals
46
Feelings of the soldiers on both sides
47
Commencement of the battle
48
Marlborough after a desperate conflict carries the wood of Taisnière
49
Bloody repulse of the Prince of Orange on the left
50
Heroic but ineffectual efforts of the Prince of Orange to restore the com bat
51
Marlborough hastens to the spot and restores the battle
52
A vigorous attack of Villars on the right weakens his centre which Marl borough prepares to attack
53
Decisive attack by Lord Orkney on the centre
54
Admirable efforts of Boufflers to regain the day
55
The Ministers falsely declare the Allies to be parties to the negotiation 225
57
Terrible cavalry action
59
Boufflers able and orderly retreat 58 Results of the battle to the Allies 59 Loss of the French and humanity of Marlborough 60 Distinguished officers ...
60
Blame unjustly thrown on the Prince of Orange in this battle
61
Reflections of Marshal Saxe on this battle
62
Grief and humanity of Marlborough after the battle
63
Capture of Mons and conclusion of the campaign
64
Continued decline of Marlboroughs influence at court
65
Unjust criticisms and censures on the campaign
66
Injudicious request of Marlborough to be made captaingeneral for life
67
His flattering reception from the Houses of Parliament
68
boroughs 429
71
Increasing jealousies of him at court
74
His trial before the Peers 71 Marlborough threatens to resign
76
Page 76 Great interests at stake in the bedchamber appointments
80
Extraordinary change in the public mind regarding the war and its hero
81
Cause of this remarkable change
82
Parallel examples in former times
83
CHAPTER VIII
84
Remarkable coincidence of particular battles in both periods
85
Remarkable parallel of the invasions of Russia by Charles XII and Napo leon
86
Proud position of Charles XII at Dresden before he began his march to Poland
87
His march from Dresden to Poland
88
Increasing difficulties of Charles in his march
89
Charles directs his march to the Ukraine to join Mazeppa
90
Defeat of Levenhaupt and capture of his convoy
91
March of Charles towards Moscow
92
After a thousand hardships they arrive at Pultowa ib 11 Preparations for the battle of Pultowa
93
Battle of Pultowa and total defeat of Charles
94
Surrender of fourteen thousand Swedes under Count Piper
95
Reflections on this event and grief it occasioned to Marlborough
96
Character of Peter the Great of Russia
97
His errors and delusion regarding him
98
Real character of his changes
99
Campaign on the Rhine and its disasters
100
Operations in Piedmont and their abortive result
101
Affairs of Spain in 1709 Increasing attachment of the Castilians to Philip
103
Independent and dignified tone assumed by Philip in the negotiations at the Hague
104
Operations in Aragon and on the Catalonian frontier ib 23 Operations on the Portuguese frontier
105
Marlboroughs opinion on the Spanish war ib 25 The government of the Netherlands again refused by Marlborough
106
New confederacy in the north and Marlboroughs advice regarding it
107
Commencement of the conferences of Gertruydenberg
108
Rigorous demands of the Allies
109
Passage of the lines of the Scarpe
115
His remonstrances with the Queen 73 He determines to resign if Mrs Masham is not removed 74 But is persuaded to yield and is seemingly reconcile...
122
And of Aire
128
Final interview between the Queen and the Duchess of Marlborough
134
55
138
Marlboroughs views on hearing of the appointment
140
Marlboroughs anxiety lest Parliament should be dissolved
147
Secret mission of Mr Cresset to Hanover who dies and Marlboroughs
153
นา 8
156
Noble conduct of Marlborough and his wise advice to the Duchess
160
X
171
11
177
12
180
13
181
15
182
tender 267
185
19
187
Marlboroughs prompt suppression of disaffection among the Guards 268 ܡܰܝ̈ܕ̄ 269
217
9
222
56
225
57
226
58
228
59
229
60
230
61
231
62
232
64
234
65
235
Marlborough obtains passports and goes abroad
236
67
237
68
238
69
239
71
241
73
242
74
243
CHAPTER X
245
Marlborough is received with the highest honours on the Continent
246
8
248
Continued malice against him at home
249
Suspension of the building of Blenheim at the public expense
250
Dissensions between Lady Masham and the Duchess of Somerset
252
And of Oxford and Bolingbroke in the cabinet ib 8 Strange mixture of parties in the Houses of Parliament
254
Contradictory measures of the Legislature in contemplation of a rupture
255
Marlboroughs conduct at this crisis
256
Mission of Mr Harley to the court of Hanover
257
Indecision of the court of Hanover and death of the Electress Sophia
258
Prudent conduct of the Elector at this crisis
259
15
261
Counter measures of the Whigs and death of the Queen
262
Instantaneous measures of the Whigs to secure the succession
263
The Earl of Mar raises the standard of rebellion at Braemar
271
Marlboroughs firm and prudent conduct on this crisis ib 27 Extent of the insurrection and measures of the Government
272
Early success of the insurgents
273
Movements in the south of Scotland and advance into England
275
Advance of the insurgents to Preston and their surrender there
276
Advance of Mar to Sheriffmuir
277
Commencement of the battle and success of Argyle on bis right 278 11
279
Indecisive result of the battle but which turns to the advantage of the English
280
Argyle is superseded in the command by Cadogan
281
Arrival of the Pretender in Scotland and his reception at Scone 282 hl 37 Passing enthusiasm and real difficulties following on his arrival
283
Reembarkation of the Pretender and suppression of the insurrection
284
Conviction and sentence of Derwentwater c
286
Noble death of Derwentwater and Kenmure 287 in 41 Reflections on this subject and impolicy of death for political crimes
288
Last years of Louis XIV
299
His death
300
Fall of Bolingbroke at the court of the Pretender
301
Trial and acquittal of Oxford
302
56 Death of the Countess of Bridgewater and Countess of Sunderland
303
Marlborough is struck with palsy and his public life ended
304
His last years and death
305
And funeral
306
His place of interment in Westminster Abbey and at last at Blenheim
308
Marlboroughs fortune and will
309
Descent of the title and estates
310
Anecdote of a descendant of Marlborough at the battle of Fontenoy
311
Remarkable kindness of disposition in Marlborough
312
His character as a husband father and friend ib 66 His suavity of manners to all and its great effects on the Alliance
313
His humanity in war and care of his soldiers
314
His equanimity when assailed by his enemies and dismissed from office
315
His magnanimity in judging of others
316
False imputation against him of being adverse to peace and fond of money
317
Subsequent life and death of the Duchess of Marlborough
319
CHAPTER XI
321
Opposite interests and causes for which the parties contended
322
Magnitude of the danger which threatened Europe if France had proved successful
323
Results which might have followed the triumph of France ib 5 Opposite sides on political questions on which the parties were ranged similar to what ...
324
Yet fundamentally the Allies and France were in both cases ranged on the same sides
325
Important difference in the parties by whom the war was opposed in the times of Marlborough and of Napoleon
326
State of the opposite parties in Great Britain since the Great Rebellion
327
The union of parties had brought about the Revolution
329
Dangers which flowed from the Revolution The funding system
330
1
331
Bolingbrokes account of its dangers
332
General corruption which was induced in the country
333
Bolingbrokes account of the general indignation at this demoralising system
335
His alarming picture of its effect on public morals
336
Strong principles of freedom and loyalty in the English character
337
18
339
Character of Bolingbroke
340
His inconsistencies and faults
342
Character of Harley Earl of Oxford
343
Swift and the Tory writers in the press
344
Feelings and principles of the High Tories in regard to the war
345
It was these causes which overturned Marlborough
346
234
347
What was the danger to be guarded against in the Peace
349
The result has proved the Tories were wrong in their policy regarding it
350
Disastrous effects and serious dangers to England which followed the leaving a Bourbon on the Spanish throne
351
Examples of this in later times
352
These dangers have arisen solely from the Spanish alliance
353
France
356
Instance of the same political infatuation in our times 357 18
358
Strange insensibility to national sins which often prevails
359
Analogy between the situation of the Tories in the War of the Succession and the Whigs in that of the Revolution
361
Extraordinary coincidence in the crises of the two contests
362
Real causes of this identity of conduct of the opposite parties on these occasions
363
Excuses which existed for the policy of the Tories at the Treaty of Utrecht from the dread of Spain
364
Bolingbrokes picture of the ruined state of the Spanish monarchy at this peri
365
What course the Tories should have pursued at the Treaty of Utrecht
367
But no excuse can be found for our violation of the Treaty of Utrecht by the Quadruple Alliance in 1834
368
Answer to the common argument used in behalf of the Quadruple Alliance 369 16
370
What England should have done on the occasion
371
Great change which the substitution of the female line for the male in Spain made in this respect on the interests of other powers
374
CHAPTER XII
376
Nature of the feudal wars
377
Great change when armies were paid by Government
378
Turenne introduced this system and brought it to perfection
379
Character of Condé
380
Peculiar character of Marlborough as a general 381 7
382
Though inferior in force he always maintained the initiative
383
Nature of war in the time of Marlborough
384
Circumspection was in him a matter of necessity
385
He was compelled to adopt the system of sieges and fix the war in
386
1
387
Reasons why Marlboroughs genius was underrated in his life
388
He was the perfection of genius matured by experience
389
His great address and suavity of manner
390
His character as a statesman
391
And in private
392
His political character after the Revolution ib 19 His faults and weaknesses
393
Circumstances which palliate these faults in him
394
His private character and elevated ideas in the disposal of money
395
His magnanimity and humanity
396
His character as drawn by Adam Smith and Bolingbroke
397
The five great generals of modern times
398
Leading characteristics of each ib 26 Character of Prince Eugene
399
His astonishing successes over the Turks
400
Narrow escape from ruin and wonderful victory at Belgrade
401
His character as a general and parallel to Napoleon
402
Daring and skill with which he extricated himself from dangers ib 31 Early life of Frederick the Great
403
His accession to the throne and vigorous application to its duties
404
His aggression on and conquest of Silesia and first victory at Mollwitz
405
His glorious successes over the Austrians
406
Who are at length obliged to make peace
407
His decided and indomitable character already appears
408
His great services to his kingdom during the next ten years of peace
409
Coalition of Austria Russia France Saxony and Sweden against Prussia ib 39 Frederick invades Saxony and conquers that country
410
Great effects of this stroke
411
He defeats the Austrians at Prague and is defeated at Kolin ib 42 Desperate situation of the Prussian monarchy
412
Fredericks marvellous victories at Rosbach and Leuthen
413
Disasters sustained by his troops in other quarters and victory of Zorndorf
414
Fredericks defeat at Hohenkirchen
415
Terrible battle of Cunnersdorf in which Frederick is defeated
416
Overwhelming misfortunes in other quarters ib 48 Victory of Frederick over Laudon at Liegnitz
417
Dreadful battle and victory of the Prussians at Torgau ib 50 Desperate state of Prussia at this time
418
Operations in the camp of Bunzelwitz in 1761
419
The death of the Empress of Russia restores his affairs
420
Wonderful result of the struggle
421
His character as a general
422
Comparison of Frederick and Napoleon
423
Their points of resemblance
424
Of Marlborough and Wellington ib 58 Points in which their situations differed
426
Great superiority of force with which Wellington had to contend
427
Marlborough made more use of cavalry than Wellingtonand why
430
Napoleons and Hannibals opinion of cavalry
431
Marlborough was more successful than Wellington in sieges
432
Causes of this circumstance ib 67 Great and remarkable land triumphs of England over France
433
Long series of land disasters sustained by France from England
434
What have been the causes of this?
436
Value of contemporary correspondence in establishing historic truth
437
4
439
Progress of the negotiations
440
8
447
ib 78 ib 79
449
16
451
19
455
24
461
Proof which Marlboroughs fall afforded of his greatness
1
The Portuguese government refuse to allow their troops to succour
7
de Torcy secretly offers bribes to Marlborough which are refused 13
13
Remarkable conversation of M de Torcy with Marlborough 14
14
His sentiments expressed to M de Torcy on a peace 15
15
Ultimatum of the Allies which is rejected by France 16
16
Marlborough still labours to effect a pacification 17
17
False accusation against Marlborough of having prevented the peace 18
18
Resolution of the StatesGeneral on the rupture of the negotiations 19
19
Reflections on the rupture of this negotiation 20
20
Noble efforts of Louis to save France 21
21
Eulogy of M Dumont on the conduct of France on this occasion 22
22
Forces on both sides at the opening of the campaign 23
23
Marlboroughs efforts to obtain an augmentation of force in the Low Coun tries 26 Which at length are partialy successful The forces at his disposal 24
24
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