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of account III. 12 which has only four verses the connec tion of thought gives no suggestion of an arrangement by strophes.

The lyric metres used by Horace are as follows:

158. The Iambic Trimeter (see 135). Epode 17.

159. The Iambic Strophe: an iambic trimeter (135)

coupled with an iambic dimeter (137) :

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For substitutions see 135, 137. Epodes 1-10.

160. The First Pythiambic Strophe: a dactylic hexameter (132) coupled with an iambic dimeter (137): —

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161. The Second Pythiambic Strophe: a dactylic hexameter (132) coupled with a pure iambic trimeter (136):—

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162. The Alemanian Strophe; a dactylic hexameter (132) coupled with a dactylic tetrameter (133):

C. I. 7, 28; Epod. 12.

163. The First Archilochian Strophe: a dactylic hexam. eter (132) coupled with a lesser Archilochian verse (134):—

C. IV. 7.

164. The Second Archilochian Strophe: a dactylic hexameter (132) coupled with an iambelegus (144) :—

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165. The Third Archilochian Strophe: an iambic trimeter (135) coupled with an elegiambus (143):

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Epod. 11. (For vs. 23, see, 135, 181.).

166. The Fourth Archilochian Strophe: a greater Archilochian verse (142) coupled with an iambic trimeter catalectic (138):

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167. The Trochaic Strophe: a Euripidean versé (140) coupled with an iambic trimeter catalectic (138) :

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C. II. 18. (For vs. 34, see 138).

168. The Ionic System, consisting of pure Ionici a minore (UU) in series of ten.

the end of each foot.

There is usually diaeresis at

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169. The Lesser Asclepiad Metre: a series of lesser Asclepiad verses (149; see also 157):—

C. I. 1; III. 30; IV. 8.

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170. The Greater Asclepiad Metre: a series of greater Asclepiad verses (150; see also 157):

C. I. 11, 18; IV. IO.

171. The First Asclepiad Strophe: a Glyconic (147) coupled with a lesser Asclepiad (149) :—

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C. I. 3, 13, 19, 36; III. 9, 15, 19, 24, 25, 28; IV. 1, 3-
Elision at the end of the Glyconic occurs C. IV. 1. 35.

172. The Second Asclepiad Strophe: three lesser Asclepiads (149) and a Glyconic (147) :—

C. I. 6, 15, 24, 33; II. 12; III. 10, 16; IV. 5, 12.

173. The Third Asclepiad Strophe: two lesser Asclepiads (149), a Pherecratic (148), and a Glyconic (147) :

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C. I. 5, 14, 21, 23; III. 7, 13; IV. 13.

174 (a). The Sapphic Strophe: three lesser Sapphic verses (151) and an Adonic (153):

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Next to the Alcaic (176) the metre most used by Horace : C. I. 2, 10, 12, 20, 22, 25, 30, 32, 38; II. 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16; III. 8, 11, 14, 18, 20, 22, 27; IV. 2, 6, 11; C. S.

(b). For the 'feminine' caesura, see 151. Sappho appears to have treated the third Sapphic and the Adonic as one continuous verse. Horace does not follow this practice absolutely, but he has hiatus between the two verses in only four cases (C. I. 2. 47; 12. 7, 31; 22. 15) in a total of 206 strophes; and in all but 12 instances a spondee (by synapheia) precedes the dactyl of the Adonic. He makes the two verses continuous in C. I. 2. 19, 25. 11, II. 16. 7; and he allows elision at the end of the third verse in IV. 2. 23 and C. S. 47. Elision at the end of the second verse occurs in II. 2. 18, 16. 34, IV. 2. 22.

175. The Greater Sapphic Strophe: an Aristophanic verse (154) coupled with a greater Sapphic (152) :

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176 (a). The Alcaic Strophe: two greater Alcaic verses (155), a nine-syllable Alcaic (139), and a lesser Alcaic (156):

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The metre most frequently used by Horace: C. I. 9, 16, 17, 26, 27, 29, 31, 34, 35, 37 ; II. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20; III. 1–6, 17, 21, 23, 26, 29; IV. 4, 9, 14, 15.

(b). Elision at the end of the third verse occurs II. 3.27; III. 29. 35.

(B) PROSODY.

177. A final syllable ending in a short vowel is not lengthened in Horace before a word beginning with two conso

nants.

178. The prosody of certain proper names is unsettled : C. III. 30. 13 Italos, but II. 7. 4 Italo; I. 28. 20 Prōserpina, II. 13. 21 Proserpinae; I. 28. 21 Ōrionis, Epod. 15. 7 Ŏrion; C. S. 1 Diana, ib. 70 Diana. Cf. also Epod. 2. 42 Apuli, 3. 16 Apuliae.

Horace has-ĕrunt in the third person plural of the perfect indicative active, Epod. 9. 17 verterunt. It occurs also S. I. 10. 45 adnuěrunt and Ep. I. 4. 7 dederunt (cf. C. III. 6. 7 dederunt); but nowhere in the Odes.

179. The final syllable of the third person singular, present or perfect, indicative is long in a few instances under the ictus, as in old Latin (see Allen's Remnants of Early Latin, Introd. 52 ff.):

C. I. 3. 36

C. I. 13. 6

C. II. 6. 14
C. II. 13. 16

C. III. 16. 26

C. III. 24. 5

pérrupft Acherónta Hérculeús labór
cérta séde manét || úmor et ín genás
ángulús ridết || ubi nón Hymétto
caéca timét aliúnde fáta

quám si quícquid arất || ímpiger Ápulús
sí figft adamantinós

Once in arsis, before the caesura :

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Horace practiced this license in the Satires also, but in his latest writings, the Epistles and the fourth book of the Odes, he abstained from it altogether.

180. SYNIZESIS: C. II. 7. 5 Pompei; apparently also, Epod. 2. 35 laqueo (see 135); and perhaps C. II. 18. 34 pueris (see 138). Under this head also are usually classed C. I. 35. 17 anteit and 37. 5 antehac; but the e of ante was probably elided, and the words pronounced ant'it, ant'hac.

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