Leviathan: The Matter, Forme, & Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiastical and Civill

Przednia okładka
The Floating Press, 1 cze 2009 - 620
Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan, from 1651, is one of the first and most influential arguments towards social contract. Written in the midst of the English Civil War, it concerns the structure of government and society and argues for strong central governance and the rule of an absolute sovereign as the way to avoid civil war and chaos.

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Review: Leviathan: Or, the Matter, Forme, & Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiasticall and CIVILL

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Many people when talking about philosophy pose the question, who is the most misunderstood philosopher in history? The most often heard candidate I hear is "Nietzsche." Though since Bertrand Russell's ... Przeczytaj pełną recenzję

Spis treści

Chapter XXV
360
Chapter XXVI
373
Chapter XXVII
409
Chapter XXVIII
437
Chapter XXIX
453
Chapter XXX
472
Chapter XXXI
499
PART III OF A CHRISTIAN COMMONWEALTH
520

Chapter VI
66
Chapter VII
89
Chapter VIII
95
Chapter IX
114
Chapter X
122
Chapter XI
138
Chapter XII
152
Chapter XIII
174
Chapter XIV
183
Chapter XV
204
Chapter XVI
229
PART II OF COMMONWEALTH
238
Chapter XVII
239
Chapter XVIII
248
Chapter XIX
265
Chapter XX
283
Chapter XXI
298
Chapter XXII
317
Chapter XXIII
339
Chapter XXIV
348
Chapter XXXII
521
Chapter XXXIII
530
Chapter XXXIV
549
Chapter XXXV
570
Chapter XXXVI
584
Chapter XXXVII
610
Chapter XXXVIII
623
Chapter XXXIX
650
Chapter XL
655
Chapter XLI
674
Chapter XLII
687
Chapter XLIII
810
PART IV OF THE KINGDOME OF DARKNESSE
835
Chapter XLIV
836
Chapter XLV
879
Chapter XLVI
914
Chapter XLVII
947
A Review and Conclusion
965
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Informacje o autorze (2009)

Thomas Hobbes was born in Malmesbury, the son of a wayward country vicar. He was educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and was supported during his long life by the wealthy Cavendish family, the Earls of Devonshire. Traveling widely, he met many of the leading intellectuals of the day, including Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei, and Rene Descartes. As a philosopher and political theorist, Hobbes established---along with, but independently of, Descartes---early modern modes of thought in reaction to the scholasticism that characterized the seventeenth century. Because of his ideas, he was constantly in dispute with scientists and theologians, and many of his works were banned. His writings on psychology raised the possibility (later realized) that psychology could become a natural science, but his theory of politics is his most enduring achievement. In brief, his theory states that the problem of establishing order in society requires a sovereign to whom people owe loyalty and who in turn has duties toward his or her subjects. His prose masterpiece Leviathan (1651) is regarded as a major contribution to the theory of the state.

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