Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub

HARVARO CCI! E LIBRARY

BY & Chris JE

Feb. 14, 1941

PREFACE.

[blocks in formation]

THIS."
"HIS work is intended to be complete in itself, devel.

oping from beginning to end the whole subject of
which it treats. But this subject is a part of a larger
one, connected with which are many underlying principles
and practical inferences not mentioned here, although
some of them, apparently, are not outside even of the
limited range of discussion prescribed for this book by its
title. To obviate the criticism which the omission of any
reference to these may naturally occasion, it seems well
to state that Poetry as a Representative Art is only one of
a series of volumes unfolding the general subject of Com-
parative Esthetics in the following order:

Art in Theory, dealing with the distinctions between
nature and art ; between the useful and the beautiful as
i esthetic art; the different theories held concerning
the latter, and their effects upon its products; the true
theory, its philosophic aspects, and the classification of the
arts as determined by it.

The Representative Significance of Form, discussing the
kinds of truth derivable from nature and from man; the
distinctions between religious, scientific, and artistic truth;
between different phases of the latter developed in the
epic, the realistic, and the dramatic, as expressed in all the
arts; and as differently expressed in the different arts,
with illustrations showing the importance of making these

ix

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

PREFACE.

THIS work is intended to be complete in itself

, devel. oping from beginning to end the whole subject of which it treats. But this subject is a part of a larger one, connected with which are many underlying principles and practical inferences not mentioned here, although some of them, apparently, are not outside even of the limited range of discussion prescribed for this book by its title. To obviate the criticism which the omission of any reference to these may naturally occasion, it seems well to state that Poetry as a Representative Art is only one of a series of volumes unfolding the general subject of Comparative Æsthetics in the following order:

Art in Theory, dealing with the distinctions between nature and art; between the useful and the beautiful as in æsthetic art; the different theories held concerning the latter, and their effects upon its products; the true theory, its philosophic aspects, and the classification of the arts as determined by it.

The Representative Significance of Form, discussing the kinds of truth derivable from nature and from man; the distinctions between religious, scientific, and artistic truth; between different phases of the latter developed in the epic, the realistic, and the dramatic, as expressed in all the arts; and as differently expressed in the different arts, with illustrations showing the importance of making these distinctions. The further relations of the same subject to each of the arts considered separately are unfolded in three essays, namely:

Poetry as a Representative Art;

Music as a Representative Art, printed for convenience in the volume treating of Rhythm and Harmony; and

Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture as Representative Arts.

The Genesis of Art-Form traces the derivation of the elements of form from their sources in mind or matter and the development, according to mental and physical requirements, of these elements so as to produce, when combined, the different art-forms. The volume directs attention to the characteristics of form essential to æsthetic effects in all the arts. The characteristics essential to each of the arts considered in itself, are discussed in two volumes completing the series, namely:

Rhythm and Harmony in Poetry and Music; and

Proportion and Harmony of Line and Color in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture.

The author wishes to express his indebtedness to Messrs. D. Appleton & Co., Houghton, Mifflin & Co., and others, for their kind permission to insert in this work certain entire poems, of which they hold the copyrights.

Altered from the Preface to the First Edition,

PRINCETON, N. J., November, 1899.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

POETRY AND PRIMITIVE LANGUAGE

1-18

Introduction, 1-All Art Representative, 3—Poetry an Artistic

Development of Language, 4-Language Representative of Mental

Processes through Material Sounds or Symbols, 4–This Book to

show how Language, and hence, how Poetic Language, can repre-

sent Thought, by pointing out, first, how SOUNDS represent

Thought in Primitive and then in Poetic Words and Intonations:

and, second, how Sounds accepted as Words are used in Different

SENSES, and how these represent Thought in Conventional and

then in Poetic Words and Phrases, 5—Primitive Words are de-

veloped according to Principles of Association and Comparison,

partly Instinctively, as in Ejaculations; partly Reflectively, as in

Imitative Sounds, 5–This Theory need not be carried too far, e-

How Language is a Gift from God, 10—Agreement with Refer-

ence to Ejaculatory and Imitative Sounds would form a Primitive

Language, II—Sounds represent Thought both in Single Words

and in Consecutive Intonations, 12—Elocution, the Interpreter of

Sounds used consecutively, 12—Representing that Blending and

Balancing of Instinctive and Reflective Tendencies which ex.

press the Emotive Nature, 12.

II.

CONVERSATION, DISCOURSE, ELOCUTION, VERSIFICA-

TION

19-31

Representative Character of Intonations, 19—Every Man has a
Rhythm and a Tune of his own, 19—Physiological Reason for
this, 20-Cultivated by Public Speaking, 21–Recitative, and the
Origin of Poetic and Musical Melody, 21-Poetry, Song, Dance,

PAGB

all connected: but not developed from each other, 22—Poetic

Pause and Accent are Developed only from Speech, 23-Pause, the

Source of Verse, 25—Breathing and the Line, 25—Hebrew

Parallelism ; Greek, 25—The Cæsura, 26-Accent, the Source of

Rhythm and Tune, 27–Feet : how produced in English, 28—In

the Classic Languages, 29—Metrical Possibilities of English, 30.

III.

ELOCUTION: ITS REPRESENTATIVE ELEMENTS CLASSI-

FIED

32-36

Pause and Accent, 32—Analyzed, the Former gives us the Element

of Duration, the Latter gives Duration, Force, Pitch, and Quality,

33—Must find what each Element represents in DISCOURSIVE

ELOCUTION, developed from Ejaculatory or Instinctive Modes of

Utterance, and in DRAMATIC ELOCUTION, developed from Imitative

or Reflective Utterance; and then apply to Poetry, 33-General

Statement of what is Represented by Duration, Force, Pitch, and

Quality, ; Rhythm the Effect of the First Two, and Tune of the

Last Two, 34.

IV.

ELOCUTIONARY AND Poetic DURATION

37-49

The Elements entering into Rhythm: Duration, and Force, 37–

Duration : Fast Time Instinctive, representing Unimportant Ideas;

Slow Time Reflective, representing Important Ideas ; Movement

a Combination of the Two, 37—The Pause as used in Elocution,

38—In Poetry, at the Ends of Lines, 39—In the Cæsura, 40-4Run-

on and End-stopped Lines, 40—Quantity, Short and Long, in

Elocution and Poetry; as produced by Vowels and Consonants, 41,

-Movement or Rhythm as influenced by Pause and Quantity, 44–

Feet of Three Syllables should represent Rapidity, 45—Predomi-

nating Long Quantity injures English Hexameters, 46—Feet of

Four Syllables represent Rapidity, 49.

« PoprzedniaDalej »