A System of Chemistry of Inorganic Bodies, Tom 1

Przednia okładka
Baldwin & Cradock, London; and William Blackwood, Edinburgh., 1831
 

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Strona 151 - When exposed to air it soon becomes covered with a white crust, which proves to be carbonate of ammonia. When thrown into water it produces a quantity of hydrogen equal to about half its bulk, and in consequence of this action the water becomes a weak solution of ammonia. When it is confined in a given portion of air, the air...
Strona 461 - When exposed to the air it rapidly absorbs oxygen, and is converted into magnesia.
Strona 495 - ... were then made of that metal. How many ages before the birth of Moses iron must have been discovered in these countries, we may perhaps conceive, if we reflect, that the knowledge of iron was brought over from Phrygia to Greece by the Dactyli,** who settled in Crete during the reign of Minos I. about 1431 years before Christ; yet during the Trojan war, which happened 200 years after that period, iron was in such high estimation, that Achilles proposed a ball of it as one of his prizes during...
Strona 713 - ... weight of water, as is equivalent to the potash contained in the nitre employed ; but no inconvenience will result from using an excess of sulphuric acid. By distilling rapidly into a clean receiver, for so long a time as the osmic fumes continue to come over, the oxide will be collected in the form of a white crust on the sides of the receiver; and there melting, it will run down in drops beneath the watery solution, forming a fluid flattened globule at the bottom. When the receiver has become...
Strona 587 - ... was not a mere barbarian conqueror, if the institutes are to be regarded as genuine, which, under the title of the Institutions of Timour, have been made known to us by a version from the Persian, executed by major Davy and professor White (Oxford, 1783). (See Gibbon's Decline and Fall, ch. 65.) TIN was known to the ancients in the most remote ages. The Phoenicians procured it from Spain and from Britain, with which nations they carried on a very lucrative commerce. It appears to have been in...
Strona 653 - It is well known that when silver is long exposed to the air, especially in frequented places, as churches, theatres, &c. it acquires a covering of a violet colour, which deprives it of its lustre and malleability. This covering which forms a thin layer, can only be detached from the silver by bending it, or breaking it in pieces with a hammer. It was examined by Mr. Proust, and found to be sulphuret of stiver.
Strona 433 - ... unless sufficient temperature has been produced by the sudden addition of the whole quantity necessary for solution. 4. When the solution, prepared with boiling water, is allowed to cool slowly, it shoots into regular crystals. These have the form of flattened hexagonal prisms, having two broad sides, with two intervening narrow ones; and terminated at each end by a quadrangular pyramid. 5. The crystals are so soluble as to be taken up when heated, merely by their own water of crystallization.
Strona 657 - ... and attracted by the magnet. When 500 parts of good Indian steel are fused along with one part of silver, the compound is greatly improved for the purposes of cutting instruments. Melted lead dissolves a great quantity of silver at a slightly red heat ; the alloy is brittle and lead-colored. Silver is easily alloyed with copper by fusion : the compound is harder, and more sonorous than silver, and retains its white color, even...
Strona 105 - Water being the substance most easily procured in every part of the earth in a state of purity, it has been chosen, by universal consent, to represent the unit of the specific gravity of all solid and liquid bodies.
Strona 287 - ... secured at the further end, so that the sulphur may be pushed forward by means of a wire, without allowing the inside of the tube to communicate with the external air. Heat the porcelain tube, and, consequently, the charcoal which it contains, to redness, and continue the heat, till air bubbles cease to come from the charcoal; then push the sulphur slowly, and piece after piece, into the porcelain tube. A substance passes through the glass tube, and condenses, under the water of the bottle, into...

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