The Senses and the Intellect

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J. W. Parker, 1855 - 614

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CHAPTER II
10
48
11
Feelings of pure air Freshness feelings of Relief
12
Feelings of insufficient and impure air Suffocation 118 119
13
Muscular tension with Movement
14
Sensation of Heat 120 122
15
Materials of food
16
General view of the Organs of digestion
17
Summary of the Physiology of digestion
18
Enumeration of parts of the Cerebrospinal centre
19
Discrimination of degrees and modes of muscular exertion
20
Nausea and Disgust
21
Nerve force is of the nature of a current
22
Examples from the effects of pain
27
Plan of Structure indicated by the arrangement of white
29
The articulate voice Vowel utterance Consonantstheir
33
Sentient and Motor roots of spinal nerves
35
Reasoning by Analogy
38
Medulla Oblongata
42
Some of the Fine Arts involve the intellect largely
44
The element of Feeling may be allied with objects
46
Contiguity tested only by entire and absolute novelty
50
MOVEMENT SENSE AND INSTINCT
58
Successions of cause and effect Case of human actions as causes
60
The Historical Memory
61
PROOFS OF SPONTANEOUS ACTIVITY
64
Speech
66
The higher branches of industry
72
CHAPTER II
99
Propriety of constituting the feelings of Organic Life into
134
Electric and Voltaic shocks 24 Electrical state of the Atmosphere
135
Baron Reichenbachs experiments
136
SEXSE OF SMELL
147
150
150
description of the Nose 5 Action of odoursthe presence of oxygen necessary to smell 6 Sensations of smell their classification 7 Fresh odours 8 Close ...
155
sensation of sweetness 11 Bad odours
156
Pungent odours 13 Ethereal odours 14 Appetizing odours 15 Flavour 16 Uses of Smell
157
SENSE OF TOUCH ib 1 Position assigned to Touch by physiologists Touch an intel lectual sense 2 Objects of Touch
159
the Skin 4 Functions and vital properties of the skin 5 Mode of action in touch 6 Sensations I Emotional SensationsSoft Touch 7 Pungent and painfu...
161
166
166
Suddenness 7 Volume or Quantity 8 Pitch or Tune 9 Waxing and waning of sound 10 Complexity Discord and Harmony 11 Timbre 12 Articulate s...
197
Duration of an impression of sound 16 Subjective sensations of sound
198
CHAPTER I
327
the whole
333
7 The active temperament
335
Emotions and Passions 6
341
SENSATIONS OF THE SAME SENSE
348
COMPOUND ASSOCIATION
353
Outline Formsscientific arbitrary
354
The vastness and complicacy of the sense acquisitions could
360
Distance and Magnitude imply other organs than the
366
Hamilton
372
4 Experience furnishes the materials of our belief
379
The appreciation of Distance follows the estimate of Magnitude
386
Perception of Solidity implied in the perception of distance
392
with an enumeration
401
ASSOCIATES OF VOLITION
409
Effects of repetition on the spontaneous and the instinctive
413
Voluntary acquisition exemplified by the case of Imitation
416
SUCCESSIONS
423
Our own actions
450
Speech recall of sayings by similarity in diver
471
Touches
475
Generalization of FormsMathematical Diagrams
481
CONTIGUOUS AGGREGATES CONJUNCTIONS
488
Natural objects identified on their scientific properties Chemical
494
PHENOMENA OF SUCCESSION
500
Successions of Human History historical comparisons 603
506
COMPOSITION OF CONTIGUITIES
545
Constructiveness in Abstract ideas
591
Terror Anger
600
The artists standard is the feeling of the effect produced
606
Platos location of the divisions of the soul in different bodily organs
612
Aristotles definition of Life or the animating principle which
619
Soul and Body are mulually correlated
625
Increase of points of resemblance
652
Sound Voice
655
Modes whereby volition may operate in resuscitating the past
658
The Nous is the place of Forms
661
Conflict of the Artistic and the Scientific modes of viewing
664
Emotional and Intellectual Senses
668
The Germs and the Development of Volition
675
F Contiguous Association in the ideas of Natural Objects
682

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