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NO. I.

THE

JUVENILE SPELLING-BOOK:

BEING

• AN EASY INTRODUCTION

TO THE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE:

CONTAINING

EASY AND FAVILLAR LESSONS IN SPELLING,
WITH APPROPIATE READING LESSONS,

CÁLCULATED
1 *To advance the learner by eating gidatjonse and

so teach the orthography
of Johnson; wal-itre pronuncil ton of Walker

BY A PICKET.
AUTHOR OF THE AMERICAN SCHOOL CLASS-ROOKS, VIZ.
TUE JUVENILE EXPOSITOR, JUVENILE MENTOR, &c. &c.

. Nothing can enter into the allections wbich strunbles at the threshold.'...Blair.

IMPROVED AND STEREOTYPED.

STEREOTYPED BY E. AND J. WHITE. NEW-YORK. FOR

DANIEL D. SAITII.

(Eleventh Stereotup. Edition.)
For sale by him at the Franho Juvenile Booli and Stationary Store. N
290 Greean ich-street, and by the principii Booksellers in this city and the l'...

1819.
(Prise 2 dolla. per dor. cena single.)

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BOOKS designed to precede and accompany this Spelling-Book, viz.

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THE JUVENILE, OR UNIVERSAL PRIMER.
THE PARENT'S MANUAL, OR CHILD'S FRIEND.
THE JUVENILE MENTOR, OR SELECT READ.

INGS.
THE JUVENILE EXPOSITOR.
PICKETS' GEOGRAPHICAL GRAMMAR, &c.

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District of New York, M.

SANSFER "?VLENEY BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the third way of February, in the thirty-eight: year • the Independence nf the United States of America, ALBERT PICKET, of the said district, has deposited ia this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as Author and Proprie. tor, in the words following, to sit: "American School Class-Book, No. 1. The JUVENILX SPELLING-BOOK: being an easy introduction to the English language. Containing easy and familiar lessous in spelling, with appropriate reading lessons, calculated to advance the learner hy easy gradations, and to reach the orthography of Jobuson, and the prognaciation of Walker. By A. Picket, author of the " Juvenile Expositor," etc. “Nothing can enter into the affections, which stumbles at the threshold."...Blair. The revised and impruved impression."

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled " An Act for the encouragernert of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the tiine therein reiptioned." And also to an agt, entitled “ A. Act, supplementary to an Act, entitled an Act for *xe encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Mars, Charts, and Books, to the author ad proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefis theree jo the Arts of desiguing, engraving and etching torical and other vrinte")

THERON RUDD,
Clerk of the Nem. Vark Diet,

PREFACE.

AN elementary book, designed for general use, ought to contain ag much useful matter as its limits will admit, and be unincumbered with abstract rules and metaphysical distinctions. It should contain, not only the standard orthography and the best usage of pronunciation, but also, plain and simple examples ; conducting the infantile pupil, step by step, from the letters of the alphabet, through syllables and words, to a series of amusing, familiar, and instructive lessons. In teaching children the first principles of reading, we should take nature for our guide. Every thing should be plain and easy. Whatever is adapted to the juvenile mind, it comprehends.

In the orthographical exercises, the lessons have been much simplified, and the pronunciation of all the words obviously pointed out, by analogical classifications, according to the specific quantity of the vowel sounds, whether long, short, middle, or broad. This plan is so simple and natural, that it requires but few directions, to enable the learner to become acquainted with the most correct orthography and harmonious pronunciation of the English language:

All uncommon of obsolete words have•ften serupulously omitted. The lumbering up of elementary books with words which are seldom or never used by chaste ortorčert-writers, and making children learn them in the first stages of thicircuucativa, is productive of very little real benefit. It is sacrificing time it clogs ébe, irsind without improving the learner either in langiare or knowledge."

The grand object of a speHmg-book, is to teach children to spell and read as soon as possible; and not to perplex them with long catalogues of words which are seldoin used.

It has been the endeavour of the author to adapt the plan of the work both in manner and matter to the capacities of youth, and to enable instructers to teach the elements of our language with ease to themselves and advantage to the learner. The reading lessons have heen selected with great care. Not a word or sentiment has been intentionally inserted, which is not consonant with the purity of religion and morality, and calculated effectually to impress upon the tender mind, the love of virtue and goodness, and to form a taste for reading..

All extraneous matter has been rejected, and the pages filled with that which is deemed necessary and useful: comprising all that seems to be proper for an elementary school-book.

In a manual of this kind, to have omitted the principles on which our language is constructed, would have been extremely culpable. The Essentials of English Grammar have, therefore, been inserted. To

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