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TO THE RIGHT REV, FATHER IN GO

RICHARD, LORD BISHOP OF OXFORD,

ON THE

TENDENCY TO ROMANISM

IMPUTED TO

DOCTRINES HELD OF OLD, AS NOW, IN THE

ENGLISH CHURCH:

WITH A

PREFACE

ON THE

DOCTRINE OF JUSTIFICATION.

BY THE REV.

E. B. PUS EY, D.D.

LATE FELLOW OF ORIEL COLLEGE;
REGIUS PROFESSOR OF HEBREW, AND CANON OF CHRIST CHURCH.

FOURTH EDITION.

OXFORD:

J. H. PARKER:
J. G. F. & J. RIVINGTON, LONDON.

To say that in nothing they may be followed which are of the Church of “ Rome, were violent and extreme. Some things they do in that they are men, in “ that they are wise men and Christian men some things, some things in that " they are men misled and blinded with error. As far as they follow reason and “ truth, we fear not to tread the selfsame steps wherein they have gone, and “ be their followers. Where Rome keepeth that which is ancienter and better, “ others whom we much more affect, leaving it for newer and changing it for “ worse ; we had rather follow the perfections of them whom we like not, than “ in defects resemble those whom we love."

HOOKER, Book V. ch. xxviii. sect. 1.

“ They which measure religion by dislike of the Church of Rome, think every “ man so much the more sound, by how much he can make the corruptions “ thereof to seem more large. .....Wisdom therefore and skill is requisite to “ know, what parts are sound in that Church and what corrupted.

“ Neither is it to all men apparent which complain of unsound parts, with " what kind of unsoundness every such part is possessed. They can say, that “ in doctrine, in discipline, in prayers, in sacraments, the Church of Rome hath “ (as it hath indeed) very foul and gross corruptions; the nature whereof, not“ withstanding, because they have not for the most part exact skill and know“ ledge to discern, they think that amiss many times which is not; and the salve of reformation they mightily call for, but where and what the sores are which “ need it, as they wot full little, so they think it not greatly material to search."

Hooker, Book IV. ch. viii. sect. 2.

GILBERT & Rivington, Printers, St. John's Square, London.

PREFACE.

10 new

The interval of rather more than a year which has elapsed since the first publication of this Letter has, by God's mercy, had much effect in healing the distractions of our Church. Rumours, which were over-hastily believed, have died away; testimony has been borne by persons unconnected with the individuals who were thought to be schismatics, that it is no new doctrine which they teach'; the very fact, that things remain as they were, has a tendency to reassure men's minds; since it is ever the tendency of novelty and schismatical teaching, to develope itself further, and detach itself more from the doctrines of the Church; stationariness is a proof of adherence to some fixed and definite standard..

They who hold these views have remained, on the whole, where they were, though they have been thoughtlessly branded with schismatical and partynames; though cast off by a portion of their brethren, and taught by the use of this separatist designation to sever themselves, and account themselves a distinct body, they have still no doctrine or practice

See e. g. Quarterly Review.

peculiar to themselves; others also keep fast and feast, Ember days and Saints' days, Lent and Easter season ; others increase weekly prayers and Communions, and are thankful for God's gift in holy Baptism ; regard Confirmation and Ordination as means of grace; prize the privilege of being members of a Church, and in her of the Communion of Saints; acknowledge or demand obedience to her; regard the Creeds as the deposits of the faith, and to be accepted without questioning, on authority, antecedent to proof; look to future judgment: the common, though partially forgotten, truths, and practices, and principles, which they advocated, have been taken up by others independently of them, nay, in some degree by those who oppose them; or what was before more timidly held, has been openly avowed; and now after the lapse of seven years, since the Tracts for the Times made their first feeble appearance, there is less show , of any thing distinctive, less by which they can be designated as a party, than there seemed to be at first. Catholic truth cannot be fettered down by partydenominations, but bursts the bands with which the enemy would bind it, by its intrinsic expansiveness. Party-names will adhere to party-views, and attest their human origin. Catholic truth may be miscalled heresy; but neither the infirmities of those who set it forth, nor the misconception of others, will stamp human superscription on that which is Divine.

Then, also, strife is no element for Christian life; and so some, having discharged what they deemed

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