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Complacency in his administration, 85. Admiration of his works,

86. Humility, 87. Resignation, 88. Gratitude, 90.-94. Sublimity

of the principle of love, 95. Anecdote of Kircher, 96. Means

by which love may be invigorated and expanded, 99.

CHAPTER II.

SECOND PRINCIPLE OF MORAL ACTION-LOVE TO ALL

SUBORDINATE INTELLIGENCES.

Sect. I. The NATURAL EQUALITY OF MANKIND, considered as the

basis of love to our neighbour,

101

Their equality in respect of their origin—the mechanism of their
bodies—their mental fuculties—their moral depravily--their pleasures,

wants and afflictions--and the termination of their mortal existence,

101–108. Argument for love founded on these circumstances,

109. Advantages of a subordination of rank in the present world,

110.

Sect. II. Of the CONNECTIONS AND RELATIONS which subsist

among mankind,

112.

Men in every quarter of the globe, are connected together by

certain ties and relations. This connection exemplified in the

different trades and employmenis in our own country, 113. in

China, Persia, Siberia, the West Indies, Norway, Sweden, &c.

113. on the surface, and in the bowels of the ocean, 115. in the

subterraneous apartments of the globe, 116. Argument for univer-

sal benevolence founded on these relations, 118-119. Physical ar-

rangements of the globe, which indicate that the Creator intend-

ed to promote an extensive and benevolent intercourse among

mankind,

119.

Sect. III. THE ULTIMATE DESTINATION OF MANKIND, as a foun-

dation for benevolence,

121.

Importance of every affection connected with an immortal exis-

tence, 122. Interesting views and relations which the scenes

of eternity present, 123–127. Our duty towards our degraded

brethren who are unqualified for a happy immortality, 127.

Sect. IV. On the effects which would ensue were the principle of

love reversed, and were rational beings to act accordingly, 127.

Effects which malevolence would produce in families, and in

larger societies, 128. in the common intercourse of life, 129. em-

ployments in which malignant beings would delight, 130-132.

present an idea of the scenes of future punishment, 133. Effects

of malevolence in relation to the Divine Being, 134. General tenden-

cy of malignant passions, 135.

Sect. V. Effects which would flow from the full operation of the

principle of Love.

136

Evils which would be eradicated, 136-139. Positive blessings

which would be enjoyed in families and larger communities 140. in

the intercourse of nations, 140. in the intellectual improvement,

and general melioration of the condition of mankind 141. in the

exercise of kindness and generosity, 143. in the diminution of phys-

ical evils, 145. Effects of love in relation to God, 146. Studies and

exercises in which benevolent beings would engage, 147. grand

object at which they would aim, 149. Present state of the moral

world, 150. Prospect of melioration in future times, 151.

Sect. VI. Universality of the principle of love,

152

It pervades the moral code of other worlds, 153. Moral precepts

common to all intelligences, 155. Love qualifies us for associa-
ting with superior beings, 156. connects nis with the inhabitants

of distant worlds, 157. One Religion prevails throughout the uni-

verse, 159. Analogy of love to the principle of Ailraction, 161.

consequences of the suspension of this principle, 163.

Sect. VII. The preceding views corroborated by Divine Rere-

lation,

165

Historical facts, religious institutions, precepts, &c. of the old

Activity of this principle, 177. The benevolent agency of God

our pattern and exemplar, 177. Operation of love in relation to

man, considered as a sensitive being, 180-184. as an intellectual be-

ing, 184. as an immortal being, 186. Love the impelling principle

to every virtue, 188. Cardinal virtues, &c. 189. Diffusive nature

of benevolence, 190. Moral systems, their inutility in reference to

practice, 193. Benevolence in relation to the inferior animals, 195.

Anecdotes of animals - Arabian horses--Baron Trenck's mouse

--spiders, &c. 197. concluding extract. 199.

CHAPTER III.

ON THE MORAL LAW, AND THE RATIONAL GROUNDS

ON WHICH ITS PRECEPTS ARE FOUNDED.

SOLEMN circumstances which attended the proclamation of this

law at Sinai, 201.

THE FIRST COMMANDMENT,

204

Tendency of mankind to violate this law, 204, Idolatry of the

Romans, Egyptians, &c. 206. Moral effects produced by idolatry,

208. cruelties of the Mexicans and other idolaters, 209, irrational-

ity of idol worship, 210. Mental idolatry, 211.

SECOND COMMANDMENT,

212

Its object, 212. Impossibility of representing the Divine Being

by external forms, 213. Debasing tendency of such attempts,

213. consequences to which they lead, 214. The only natural im.

age of God, 215. Expansion of the universe, 216. Christian

idolatry, 217. Causes of Pagan idolatry, 219.

THIRD COMMANDMENT,

220

Explained, 220. Manner in which it is violated, 220.

consequences which would follow its general violation, 222. Ef-

fects of religious veneration, 223.

Fourth COMMANDMENT,

224

Importance of the Sabbath to man as a day of rest, 224. and as

a season for religious contemplation, 227. Work of Creation, 227.

of Redemption, 230. Public worship, 231. Consequences which

would follow were the Sabbath abolished, 232.

Page

FIFTH COMMANDMENT,

233

General remarks on the preceding precepts, 233. Relations of

mankind, 234. consequences which would follow were the law

which respects these relations reversed, 235. Effects of universal

obedience to this precept, 237.

SIXTH COMMANDMENT,

239

References of this law explained, 239. consequences which

would flow from its universal violation, 242. Counteraction of

the principle of hatred, &c. 243.

Seventh COMMANDMENT,

244

Explained, 244. Marriage and Divorces, 245. ' Dreadful effects

which would flow from universal licentiousness, 246. Dismal ef-

fects of prostitution, 249. This law peculiar to the inhabitants of

our globe, 250.

EIGHTH COMMANDMENT,

251

General Remarks, 251. Various modes in which this law is vio-
lated, 252. Consequences of its general violation, 252. Benefi-
cial effects which would flow from obedience to its requirement,

254.

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