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THE EDINBURGH TRANSLATION OF C. W. BUCH, REVISED WITH LARGE ADDITIONS
FROM THE FOURTH GERMAN EDITION, AND OTHER SOURCES.

BY HENRY B. SMITH, D.D.,

PROFESSOR IN THE UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK.

VOLUME I.

NEW YORK:

SHELDON & COMPANY, PUBLISHERS,

498 & 500 BROADWAY.

1867.

“ Nec pigebit autem mo sicubi hæsito, quærere, nec pudebit sicubi erro, discere." -AUGUSTINUS.

“ Ideoque utile est, plures (libros) a pluribus fieri diverso stilo, non diversa fide, etiam de quæstionibus eisdem, ut ad plurimos res ipsa perveniat, ad alios sic, ad alios autem sic."-IDEM.

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by

SHELDON & COMP In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Sonthern District of New York.

PREFACE BY THE EDITOR.

The first edition of Hagenbach's History of Doctrines was published in Germany in 1841. Mr. Buch's translation of this edition appeared in Edinburgh in 1846 ; a second edition, comprising a part of the additions to the second German edition (1848), was issued in 1850; and a third, without further revision or alteration, in 1858. Meanwhile, the German work was so favorably received, that it appeared in a third, and a fourth (1857) edition, each containing improvements and additions.

All these improvements are comprised in the present revision, together with citations from other authors, and references to the more recent German, as well as English and American literature. Among the works most freely used in making these additions are Gieseler's Dogmengeschichte, 1855 ; Neander’s Christliche Dogmengeschichte, edited by Jacobi (translated by J. E. Ryland, London, 1858); and, particularly, the second edition of Baur's Dogmengeschichte, 1858. The latter work, though affected by the theological prepossessions of the author, recently deceased, exhibits a thorough knowledge of the different shades of opinion, as well as of the general characteristics of each period. The additions thus made to the Edinburgh edition, and to the text of Hagenbach, increase the matter of the volume about one third. What is added to Hagenbach, is uniformly indicated by brackets; and this includes some references and citations by the English translator. The sign † is usually prefixed to the name of a Roman Catholic aut ; the sign * prefixed, is intended to commend the work. The Edinburgh translation has been revised throughout ; in some instances it was found necessary to rewrite whole sentences and even paragraphs. Those passages, too, have been translated, which were there omitted, because “ they were found to be of such a nature as to convey little definite meaning in translation.”

The value of Dr. Hagenbach's work is attested by the constant. demand for new editions in Germany, in the midst of much competition. It has, as a text-book, its peculiar merits and advantages, in giving a candid and compressed statement of the main points, fortifying every position by exact and pertinent citations from the original sources. The theological position of the author is on the middle ground between the destructive criticism of the school of Tübingen, and the literal orthodoxy of the extreme Lutherans, while he also sympathises with the Reformed rather than with the

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