Caliban's Reason: Introducing Afro-Caribbean Philosophy

Przednia okładka
Psychology Press, 2000 - 304
Annotation "Caliban's Reason" introduces the general reader to Afro-Caribbean philosophy. In this ground-breaking work, Paget Henry traces the roots of this discourse in traditional African thought and in the Christian and Enlightenment traditions of Western Europe. Since Afro-Caribbean thought is inherently hybrid in nature and marked by strong competition between its European and African orientations, Henry highlights its four main influences--traditional African philosophy, the Afro-Christian school, Poeticism and Historicism--as his organizing principle for discussion. Offering a critical assessment of such writers as Wilson Harris, Derek Walcott, Edward Blyden, C.L.R. James and George Padmore, "Caliban's Reason" renders a much-needed portrait of Afro-Caribbean philosophy and fills a significant gap in the field.

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Spis treści

The African Philosophical Heritage
19
C L R James African and AfroCaribbean Philosophy
45
Frantz Fanon African and AfroCaribbean Philosophy
66
Wilson Harris and Caribbean Poeticism
88
UNITY RATIONALITY AND AFRICANA THOUGHT
113
Sylvia Wynter Poststructuralism and Postcolonial Thought
115
AfroAmerican Philosophy A Caribbean Perspective
142
Habermas Phenomenology and Rationality An Africana Contribution
165
RECONSTRUCTING CARIBBEAN HISTORICISM
193
PanAfricanism and Philosophy Race Class and Development
195
Caribbean Marxism After the Neoliberal and Linguistic Turns
219
Caribbean Historicism Toward Reconstruction
245
Conclusion
271
Notes
281
Index
291
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Informacje o autorze (2000)

Paget Henry is Professor of Africana Studies and Sociology at Brown University. He is author of PeripheralCapitalism and Underdevelopment in Antigua (1985) and co- editor of Newer Caribbean: Decolonization, Democracy andDevelopment (1983) and C.L.R. James' Caribbean (1992).

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