Another Japan is Possible: New Social Movements and Global Citizenship Education

Przednia okładka
Stanford University Press, 2008 - 406
This book looks at the emergence of internationally linked Japanese nongovernmental advocacy networks that have grown rapidly since the 1990s in the context of three conjunctural forces: neoliberalism, militarism, and nationalism. It connects three disparate literatures on the global justice movement, on Japanese civil society, and on global citizenship education. Through the narratives of fifty activists in eight overlapping issue areas global governance, labor, food sovereignty, peace, HIV/AIDS, gender, minority and human rights, and youth Another Japan is Possible examines the genesis of these new social movements; their critiques of neoliberalism, militarism, and nationalism; their local, regional, and global connections; their relationships with the Japanese government; and their role in constructing a new identity of the Japanese as global citizens. Its purpose is to highlight the interactions between the global and the local that is, how international human rights and global governance issues resonate within Japan and how, in turn, local alternatives are articulated by Japanese advocacy groups and to analyze citizenship from a postnational and postmodern perspective.
 

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Spis treści

Development of Japanese Nongovernmental
12
PARTI GLOBAL GOVERNANCE
17
Historical Periodization of Japanese Advocacy NGOs 2021
20
Examples of Japanese Advocacy NGO Mission Statements 2830
28
A Protestography of Japanese Advocacy NGOs Since
36
Kyoto Social Forum Another World Is Possible
45
Global Governance Monitoring and Japan
51
Education Empowerment and Alternatives to Neoliberalism
59
Japan and International War Crimes
167
Nuclear Disarmament Advocacy and Peace Education
176
Building a Citizens Peace Movement in Japan and Asia
182
Information Booth of the Japanese Network of People
187
Introduction to Part V
189
HIVAIDS Gender and Backlash
198
Introduction to Part VI
211
Gender Human Rights and Trafficking in Persons
220

Tobin Tax Kyoto Social Forum and Pluralism
69
Education for Civil Society Capacity Building
76
Community Development Peace and Global Citizenship
81
Nonregular Employment Forum Inaugural Symposium
85
Introduction to Part II
87
Corporate Restructuring and Homelessness
95
Migration Trafficking and Free Trade Agreements
102
Water Global Commons and Peace
110
Japanese Farmers Protest at the Fifth World Trade Organization
115
Introduction to Part III
117
Agricultural Liberalization World Trade Organization and Peace
123
Multifunctionality of Agriculture over Free Trade
130
SelfSufficiency Safety and Food Liberalization
138
World Peace Now Peace Parade in Tokyo December 14 2004
141
We Want Blue Sky in Peaceful Okinawa
147
World Peace
152
Article 9 and the Peace Movement
158
As a Lesbian Feminist in Japan
230
Womens Active Museum on War and Peace
241
Introduction to Part VII
249
Antidiscrimination Grassroots Empowerment and Horizontal
258
Indigenous Peoples Rights and Multicultural Coexistence
266
On the Recognition of the Indigenous Peoples Rights of the Ainu
272
Art Activism and Korean Minority Rights
281
Disability and Gender
291
The UN Convention on Refugee and Asylum Protection in Japan
295
Death Penalty and Human Rights
304
Introduction to Part VIII
313
Ecology Youth Action and International Advocacy
323
Slow Life Ecology and Peace
331
Organizations Interviewed
351
References
367
Index
393
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Informacje o autorze (2008)

Jennifer Chan is Associate Professor of Education at the University of British Columbia. She is the author of Gender and Human Rights Politics in Japan (Stanford, 2004)

Informacje bibliograficzne