The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, Tom 1

Przednia okładka
G. Bell, 1897 - 428
 

Co mówią ludzie - Napisz recenzję

Nie znaleziono żadnych recenzji w standardowych lokalizacjach.

Inne wydania - Wyświetl wszystko

Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Popularne fragmenty

Strona 17 - NAVAL AND MILITARY HEROES of GREAT BRITAIN ; or, Calendar of Victory. Being a Record of British Valour and Conquest by Sea and Land, on every day in the year, from the time of William the Conqueror to the Battle of Inkermann. By Major Johns, RM, and Lieut.
Strona xxvi - To Dr. Jonathan Swift, the most agreeable companion, the truest friend, and the greatest genius of his age.
Strona 62 - As to his body there can be no dispute; but examine even the acquirements of his mind, you will find them all contribute in their order towards furnishing out an exact dress : to instance no more ; is not religion a cloak, honesty a pair of shoes worn out in the dirt, selflove a surtout, vanity a shirt, and conscience a pair of breeches, which, though a cover for lewdness as well ag nastinesa, is easily slipt down for the service of both...
Strona 17 - MOTLEY (JL). The Rise of the Dutch Republic. A History. By John Lothrop Motley. New Edition, with Biographical Introduction by Moncure D. Conway. 3 vols.
Strona 169 - ... end : he stormed and swore like a madman, and swelled till he was ready to burst. At length, casting his eye upon the bee, and wisely gathering causes from events (for they knew each other by sight),
Strona 18 - ... the Races of Man, and their Geographical Distribution. With AN ANALYTICAL SYNOPSIS OF THE NATURAL HISTORY OF MAN by Dr. Hall. With a Map of the World and 1 2 coloured Plates. 5$. PINDAR. Translated into Prose by Dawson W.
Strona 22 - The History of Egypt, from the Earliest Times till the Conquest by the Arabs, AD 640, 2 Maps and upwards of 400 Woodcuts.
Strona 17 - MUDIE'S British Birds ; or, History of the Feathered Tribes of the British Islands. Revised by W. CL Martin. With 52 Figures of Birds and 7 Coloured Plates of Eggs. 2 vols.
Strona 18 - PICKERING'S History of the Races of Man, and their Geographical Distribution. With AN ANALYTICAL SYNOPSIS OF THE NATURAL HISTORY OF MAN by Dr.
Strona 333 - ... his green boughs, and left him a withered trunk : he then flies to art, and puts on a periwig, valuing himself upon an unnatural bundle of hairs, (all covered with powder,) that never grew on his head; but now, should this our broomstick pretend to enter the...

Informacje o autorze (1897)

Apparently doomed to an obscure Anglican parsonage in Laracor, Ireland, even after he had written his anonymous masterpiece, A Tale of a Tub (c.1696), Swift turned a political mission to England from the Irish Protestant clergy into an avenue to prominence as the chief propagandist for the Tory government. His exhilaration at achieving importance in his forties appears engagingly in his Journal to Stella (1710--13), addressed to Esther Johnson, a young protegee for whom Swift felt more warmth than for anyone else in his long life. At the death of Queen Anne and the fall of the Tories in 1714, Swift became dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin. In Ireland, which he considered exile from a life of power and intellectual activity in London, Swift found time to defend his oppressed compatriots, sometimes in such contraband essays as his Drapier's Letters (1724), and sometimes in such short mordant pieces as the famous A Modest Proposal (1729); and there he wrote perhaps the greatest work of his time, Gulliver's Travels (1726). Using his characteristic device of the persona (a developed and sometimes satirized narrator, such as the anonymous hack writer of A Tale of a Tub or Isaac Bickerstaff in Predictions for the Ensuing Year, who exposes an astrologer), Swift created the hero Gulliver, who in the first instance stands for the bluff, decent, average Englishman and in the second, humanity in general. Gulliver is a full and powerful vision of a human being in a world in which violent passions, intellectual pride, and external chaos can degrade him or her---to animalism, in Swift's most horrifying images---but in which humans do have scope to act, guided by the Classical-Christian tradition. Gulliver's Travels has been an immensely successful children's book (although Swift did not care much for children), so widely popular through the world for its imagination, wit, fun, freshness, vigor, and narrative skill that its hero is in many languages a common proper noun. Perhaps as a consequence, its meaning has been the subject of continuing dispute, and its author has been called everything from sentimental to mad. Swift died in Dublin and was buried next to his beloved "Stella.

Informacje bibliograficzne