Obrazy na stronie
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E He woo, like Armado, has when

quick venew of wit, aye by the salt E the Mediterranean,” becomes now a

ins, and his funny speeches somehow sormed into funeral dirges. The only

to take things Derrily are the servants, op on the remains of the marriage bake

ami get well drunken thereon; and the Surs who do the same thing.

e must be something uncomfortable and enes, then, in the ceremony. Teat's my

fron the text, and I will only add sample more."Tis a well-known fact that

and of Huellen and bis ieek, it takes a e company of men to chase the dying bride

te hold him tght whilst the ceremony Teang performed, otherwise he would cercmmig fty as far as he could from the Temple of

ence to all this empty gibing. Tbere are mewhere in real earnest the wedding-day is isable from the rising of the sun to its

un down in the west. an od dotard of gaty winters leads to the altar," so the sonable cant of the day pats it. a blooming metom of twenty summers, and peopie cry "God bless them over the happy pair, and the dengymnan invokes the bedison of heaven on their leats and enjoins the bcary old man to love

cherish ah, hideu us muckery!) the shrinkfat girt at his side. - Love and cherish!"The words keep singing in the victz's ears, as she helps her husband out of the sacred portal. Love and cherish-aye, to be tied. Wezentius-like, the dead to the living, the young to the old, the strong to the imbecue. th Death (merciful Death) do them part. Wat joy and merry

making in the halls of that demon who prele sites over unequal marriages, as he bebolds the

seciliul victim all read out with silk and

mes the price of the sacrifice-led to the Du tar for well knows ie that there will be TN another couple enchained in his bondage,

wherein Turks deep secret reachery, disgust too the streng for words: viere coldren grow un.

lowing between parents wh waom there has serer been the empty pretence of love, and in

cants are reared and puuriseed acid an atmoe spiere of false lies at jedy domestic vice.

But we must still cry - Hyden, u Hymenæe !" ce and wish the happy ez ipie ai the joy in life,

is and throw the lucky sii, ver as the carriage is state of while away and afforis apocier refutation to they the test Crabbed Age a id Youth cannot live

But the weathing chines as they ring their sek remote se peals oer land nu ez, this heavenly

en memang at Tuimaster, seem to teach no such Le tem Vshis and the faces of ail the people at

they the hail augue no suei wretched results as we 10. Dave been presignar.

Ris the day ou wai Ez is to take, " for better be worse the husband of her choice, witor she loves 33 0.7 , girl of pure, un

e heart in the fu buså of maideohood, santesked eutzriy to his every nod and bed the shore of her lure, wifully blind to his

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bei lui, suszacogibe ebehanted raiiey least taila-Joaca clergymen to beip one another tid ja basi ter tako zát. It is do in the service such begins wib “ Dearly

ca of ste is describe micute.y this beural" and enis rich ** amazemen." He, wie wg careZF; oht as is beca doce teiore, too, perebanee, is taking of some not far diswill og besar baris. La me inger for a witte tapt day ben te wu pay caiei pars in a cereune as Graser's sie iais morning, and mony ike this, and, accoràng.r, is very ange ic 206 st a: tas nec sagoss.

in his demeanour, and interesanzes subduedi Fura sa about to be r.2 je so na py, sureis reperice with the besy of bridesmais. Lisaks ss.naszes cicies and orercast, ani Soon are the carriages arranged, and of to tie tesoro Lis basgiis seem Dot to be : Turlaiaster, where everybody seemis keeping bratza baaring sae exuitalian. Per-boiday, and on toe look-ou: for the wejding taps bestesiog ci a certain morning ioag .coritge, for the Stewarts are one of the first LUZ 250-50 loaz ita ide Demory of it is bus. famides of the neighbourhood, and great fadai sacertain-ulen be sbi at a mock : vourites with the lower classes, and many a altar, age a rock cierzyznan, and did], in the Siewart ere this had been returned for Turlagar daven and in cooi biod, wku per- minster without opposition. “God b.ess jare:sei, and dricromise to love and cherish them?" is the unanimous cry from the crowd a T. shown be knew he was deroting to who wait round the church; and “ God bless izz nisery. Ai the actors in that them." seem the be is to say in their erosi fesCred ceremony are dead Dow, sare bimse.f and tire tones, for the riogers hare been allowed Vaiz; ani, borrible ibcuzó: she lives oniş unlimited beer, and are doing unteard-of feats for redzezncemail ber love sur uia curdied in the belirioging art. Surely the weiding, inu bate, ucrelenting, saraze bate—all the under such auspices as these, candot fail írom Eterzisa oi ber rind lu..y employed in working being a very happy one. destruction of his own future happiness, and Our friend of the - Biack Lion” is in great thzs of the poor girl whom he was so soon to form to-day – hilariously festive in his deins with himself in misery. He has had no meanour, and willing to stand drink to any chance to repent, be thinks-no “golden grace amount to those doubtful customers, to whose of opportanty" has beea presented to bim. scores he wouidi on any other day point with Remorse, wiih its scourge, has tortured him sterniy-reproving finger. And many officers, foil sore si conscience has never been at rest drill orer, stroll into the cathedral to see the wibia bis breast. Long ago he learnt that the ceremony, or, as Robson profanely expresses brother-officer, who acted the clergyman's part himself,'" to see the happy man turned off! in this Masque of Death, had committed How festive the fellow looks! People always suicide, but be had previously received a letter look that way before they are married, you from him, beseechiog him to redress this foul know, but aiter"Wrong, and do justice to the injured woman, The bishop, with his genial smile and hearty whose life he had thus cruelly blighted. And | welcome, is there too. Old Stewart is a fast now the burden rang in bis ears, " Too late, too friend of bis, and many were the wild bouts late" he had commenced a new career, be they enjoyed at Corpus together when lads, ere bad made another's innocent happiness depend that the matrimonial bonds had contined the est on him, and he must go on with it to the dignitary of the Church within due order; and,

for the matter of that, he hopes to get a good Sot very bappy reflections for a wedding breakfast to-day, at his old friend's house, and murring-an evil omen for the voyage of Life, to be emancipated for a short season from the when the sky is thus overcast so early in the thrall of the wife of his bosom. Even the morning. But there is no help for it, thinks organist seems inspired to-day, and plays the the Captain; and with this philosophy steeling“ Wedding March," as the procession streams bis heart, he dons the wedding finery, and goes on to the aitar, with sonorous effect, making to meet the bride-the perfect type of a hand- the grand old organ discourse Mendelssohn's some, well-dressed, English gentleman. jubilant music in the most impressive manner. "A proper man,” say the bystanders, as And, to crown all, the glorious sun streams in they bebold him. A braw husband for the through the beautiful memorial window, and pretty mistress!" chime in the servants, in all plays like a many-coloured halo of purple and tear wedding appointments; all but the foot- gold and amethystine rays round the fair head Ban, Jeames, who keeps a discreet silence, and, of the trembling bride, as she kneels by Grantlike the proverbial monkey, thinks the more. ley's side, and utters the response in a sweet,

Round Ella are gathered a most bewitching low whisper. Would she obey him? would coterie of bridesmaids, each rivalling the other she honour him? Aye, until the grave should in good looks and gay dress; but she stands open for one or both of them, for “ Love is there, the fairest flower of them all-a flower strong as Death.” Would she be faithful to well worth the wooing and the winning, and bim, come weal come woe?-would she cherish not a girl there but envies her lot, and would him in sickness, in suffering? Aye, her every fain be in her place, little recking of the misery thought, her every wish, should be for his bapin store for her.

piness. As the sweet devotional face looked up The curate is to assist, as it is impossible that through the veil of tears, and rested on a couple can be married now-a-days without at '“ chief of men to her,” vows like the:

end.

into my ear; and what I say wrong, correct-- the froth off. He wbo, like Armado, has when and what I say well, approve of.

he likes “a quick venew of wit, aye by the salt Now, I have heard many inen of my acquaint- wave of the Mediterranean,” becomes now a ance unblushingly aver that their wedding-day hapless idiot, and his funny speeches somehow was the most unhappy one of their lives; and are transformed into funeral dirges. The only this in cases in which everything was favour- persons who take things merrily are the servants, able—where beauty and wealth went hand in who swoop on the remains of the marriage bakehand; when Erycina-fair, laughing goddess-meats, and get well drunken thereon; and the was radiant in her favour; when Plutus smiled postboys, who do the same thing. his substantial approval; and in cases where There must be something uncomfortable and the after wedded life was as happy as a child's i wretched, then, in the ceremony. That's my dream.

deduction from the text, and I will only add Let me try and explain this seeming paradox one example more. 'Tis a well-known fact that as best I may, and tremble the while lest an eye in the land of Fluellen and his leek, it takes a of heavenly blue gleam with scorn and con- whole company of men to chase the flying bridetempt when it lights on this ill-fated page. Now groom, to hold him tight whilst the ceremony why, let me ask the question-why on this is being performed, otherwise he would cerauspicious day does every performer in the play tainly fly as far as he could from the Temple of think it exceeding proper to come down to the Hymen. ceremony with a face of exceeding dolour, as if A truce to all this empty gibing. There are about to proceed to his immediate execution? cases where in real earnest the wedding-day is To wit, the “father of the bride”-generally a miserable, from the rising of the sun to its very genial, pleasant man, with no great wit going down in the west. An old dotard of certainly, but“ a merry man,” like the Nurse's eighty winters“ leads to the altar," so the husband-is this morning as gruff and un- fashionable cant of the day puts it, a blooining pleasant as though he were going to act the victim of twenty summers, and people cry“God chief character in one of those fatal“ marriages bless them!" over the happy pair, and the of the Loire," spoken of in “ Enoch Arden.” | clergyman invokes the benison of heaven on their In common life he can speak tolerably well, heads, and enjoins the boary old man to love his words, though not eloquent, are to the and cherish (ah, hideous mockery!) the shrinkpoint; this morning he essays a speech, and | ing girl at his side. “ Love and cherish !”— after a few melancholy grunts, breaks down, the words keep ringing in the victim's ears, as she and subsides into the most abject misery. Then helps her husband out of the sacred portal. Love "the mother of the bride,” dissolved in tears, and cherish !-aye, to be tied, Mezentius-like, crying when everyone expects her, and it is her the dead to the living, the young to the old, the bounden duty, to make merry, seeing that she strong to the imbecile, till Death (merciful has got rid of one more of her well-trained Death) do thein part. What joy and merryflock. As for the principal actors, who more making in the halls of that demon who prenervous, and timid, and generally miserable sides over unequal marriages, as he beholds the than the bridegroom? It is the greatest trouble sacrificial victim all tricked out with silk and in the world to make bim "come early," if in jewels—the price of the sacrifice--led to the time at all; and then, so great his trepidation altar ! for well knows he that there will be is, that he uniformly drops the ring, and pro- another couple enchained in his bondage, duces an excitement of the least agreeable order, wherein lurks deep secret treachery, disgust too when Paterfamilias, utterly regardless of the strong for words ; where children grow unsacred building, relieves his bursting mind with loving between parents with whom there has a few hearty anathemas. Who more tearful never been the empty pretence of love, and inand fainting than the bride ? Instead of cele-fants are reared, and nourished arid an atmobrating her victory and capture of the prize sphere of false lies and deadly domestic vice. with drums and trumpets, she inevitably hangs | But we must still cry “ Hymen, ô Hymenae!" out signals of distress, and sheds tears enough and wish the happy couple all the joy in life, to quench the torch of Hymen and all his and throw the lucky slių per as the carriage is attendants. The best men” are in a state of whirled away, and affords another refutation to comatose wretchedness : they flutter an' they the text, “ Crabbed Age a nd Youth cannot live were even birds under the eye of the serpent, together.” for they know, each man of them, that the But the wedding chimes, as they ring their bridesmaids are speculating on the not remote silvery peals o'er land and 'ea, this heavenly contingency of a marriage with them, if wind morning at Turlminster, seem to teach no such and tide favours. The latter, I will do them lesson as this, and the faces of all the people at the credit to say, are somewhat festive : they the hall augur no such wretched results as we are attired gorgeously, and dress certainly hath have been prosing over. charins to soothe the minds of women, and It is the day on which Ella is to take," for suffers them not to be fierce; and they are better for worse," the husband of her choice, assisting at a suggestive ceremony, and women whom she loves as only a girl of pure, unalways like to be important. Even the funny stained heart, in the full blush of maidenhood, man, on these wretched occasions, seems under can love-devoted entirely to his every nod and a cloud; bis jokes fall flat as ehampagne withi' veck, the slave of her love, wilfully blind to his

every fault, walking along the enchanted valley | least half-a-dozen clergymen to help one another hand in hand with her true knight. It is no in the service which begins with “ Dearlyintention of mine to describe minutely this beloved” and ends with “amazement.” He, wedding ceremony; ost has it been done before, too, perchance, is thinking of some not far disand by better hands. Let me linger for a little tant day when he will play chief part in a cerewhile at Grantley's side this morning, and mony like this, and, accordingly, is very angelic assist at his meditations.

in his demeanour, and interchanges subdued For a man about to be made so happy, surely repartee with the bevy of bridesmaids. his face is strangely clouded and overcast, and Soon are the carriages arranged, and off to the tenor of his thoughts seem not to be Turlminster, where everybody seems keeping brightened by anything like exultation, Per- holiday, and on the look-out for the wedding haps he is thinking of a certain morning long cortége, for the Stewarts are one of the first long ago-so long that the memory of it is but families of the neighbourhood, and great fadim and uncertain-when he stood at a inock vourites with the lower classes, and many a altar, before a inock clergyman, and did, in the Stewart ere this had been returned for Turlsight of heaven and in cool blood, wilfully per- minster without opposition. "God bless jure bimself, and did promise to love and cherish them !" is the unanimous cry from the crowd a Forman, whom he knew he was devoting to who wait round the church ; and “God bless a life-long misery. All the actors in that them !" seem the bells to say in their most feseruel ceremony are dead now, save himself and tive tones, for the ringers have been allowed Natbalie; and, horrible thought! she lives only unlimited beer, and are doing unheard-of feats for vengeance~all her love for him curdled in the bellringing art. Surely the wedding, into hate, unrelenting, savage hate-all the under such auspices as these, cannot fail from energies of her mind fully employed in working being a very happy one. destruction of his own future happiness, and Our friend of the “ Black Lion” is in great that of the poor girl whom he was so soon to form to-day — hilariously festive in his delink with himself in misery. He has had no meanour, and willing to stand drink to any chance to repent, he thinks-no “golden grace amount to those doubtful customers, to whose of opportunity" has been presented to him. scores he would on any other day point with Remorse, with its scourge, has tortured him sternly-reproving finger. And many officers, full sorely; conscience has never been at rest drill over, stroll into the cathedral to see the within his breast. Long ago he learnt that the ceremony, or, as Robson profanely expresses brother-officer, who acted the clergyman's part himself, " to see the happy man turned off! in this Masque of Death, had committed How festive the fellow looks! People always suicide, but he had previously received a letter look that way before they are married, you from him, beseeching him to redress this foul know, but after” wrong, and do justice to the injured woman, The bishop, with his genial smile and hearty whose life he had thus cruelly blighted. And welcome, is there too. Old Stewart is a fast now the burden rang in bis ears, “Too late, too friend of his, and many were the wild bouts late?" He had commenced a new career, he they enjoyed at Corpus together when lads, ere had made another's innocent happiness depend that the matrimonial bonds had confined the ent on him, and he must go on with it to the dignitary of the Church within due order; and, end.

for the matter of that, he hopes to get a good Not very happy reflections for a wedding breakfast to-day, at his old friend's house, and morning—an evil omen for the voyage of Life, to be emancipated for a short season frorn the when the sky is thus overcast so early in the thrall of the wise of his bosom. Even the morning. But there is no help for it, thinks organist seems inspired to-day, and plays the the Captain; and with this philosophy steeling“ Wedding March," as the procession streams bis heart, he dons the wedding finery, and goes on to the altar, with sonorous effect, making to meet the bride-the perfect type of a hand- the grand old organ discourse Mendelssohn's some, well-dressed, English gentleman. jubilant music in the most impressive manner.

“A proper man, say the bystanders, as And, to crown all, the glorious sun streams in they behold him. “A braw husband for the through the beautiful memorial window, and pretty mistress!” chime in the servants, in all plays like a many-coloured halo of purple and teir wedding appointments; all but the foot- gold and amethystine rays round the fair head man, Jeames, who keeps a discreet silence, and, of the trembling bride, as she kneels by Grantlike the proverbial monkey, thinks the more. ley's side, and utters the response in a sweet,

Round Ella are gathered a most bewitching low whisper. Would she obey him ? would coterie of bridesmaids, each rivalling the other she honour bim? Aye, until the grave should in good looks and gay dress; but she stands open for one or both of them, for “Love is there, the fairest flower of them all-a flower strong as Death.” Would she be faithful to well worth the wooing and the winning, and bim, come weal come woe? --would she cherish not a girl there but envies her lot, and would him in sickness, in suffering? Aye, her every fain be in her place, little recking of the misery thought, her every wish, should be for his hapin store for her.

piness. As the sweet devotional face looked up The curate is to assist, as it is impossible that through the veil of tears, and rested on the a couple can be married now-a-days without at " chief of men to her," vows like these were

un

sore,

hers"uttered not, yet comprehended," was groom; so much that the good Bishop got very that dear spirit's silent prayer ;

and the husky and maudlin as he rose to propose just man by her side felt for one moment supremely, one toast more-it might have been his feelings, triumphantly happy, and resolutely closed his all the same. I shall trespass too far on the eyes to the dark future, and lived but for the province of the Turlminster Herald, and my happy present.

dear friend Snarler will say that I write very And the congregation-they entered into the much in the “penny book” style, if I dwell spirit of the thing completely, and the tears any more on these details. Let me only, say gushed from the faded, worn eyes of many an that when that breakfast was ended, and the old maid, who attended there, and watched the travelling-carriage ready, everybody was fully ceremony from some dark, remote pes. I primed to the expression point, and those have often wondered what the fascination is that invited guests,” tears, were in greater request impels the hopeless sisterhood to such regular than ever. attendance at weddings. No matter where the A sturdy hand clasp from the Squire made nuptials are celebrated, there are the devoted | Grantley's hand tingle, as he said, "God bless spinsters to be found, with sympathising looks you, my boy! You have won a jewel; treat and eyes filled with tears, and in their hearts, her kindly." perhaps, just one little touch of envy at the “So help me, God, I will !” answered Grantbride's happy lot (and who may blame them? ley, fervently. They are but women, and, though their hearts With Mrs. Stewart the parting was be soured by disappointment and broken vows, Ella had been the light of her eyes, and she have something womanly lingering about them would not be comforted. still). Often do they fee the pew-openers libe. "There, there, don't cry,” said the old Squire rally to be enabled to get a good view of the kindly; “if they live as happily as we have happy event; it seems to do them good, poor done, I am not afraid for their future.” hearts, and who would grudge them that? I Once more a hearty cheer, and the carriage is don't know whether the blacksmith at Gretna- wbirled away and lost in a cloud of dust, bearGreen has a maiden sister living; if so, I war- ing the bridegroom with his precious charge to rant you she never misses one wedding. the fair Rhineland, where they had elected to

The Curate, I am afraid, assisted extremely spend the honeymoon, ill at this ceremony. It was rather a trial to Let them be happy now, in Heaven's name! have to read the solemn words of the Church's Let them revel in the blissful dream for the benisonfover the nuptials of another, when they present: the time will come when the sun will might have been his own. And with this they have set on their happiness, and the bleak, cold must be taken into consideration that he could moorland stretch its weary length before themnot keep his eyes off Katie, and when she cried when the bride, who now looks up with trusthis eyes got dím too, and produced altogether ing love into her husband's face, will dread the many blunders. And now the last blessing is sound of his footsteps, and cease not to moan pronounced, in the good old Bishop's sonorous the live-long day, “I am aweary, aweary, and I voice, and the injunction, “Whom God hath would that I were dead.” Let them go on joined together, let no man put asunder,” and lotos-eating for the present : let the wife of an the happy pair, joined for ever and aye, make hour hug the semblance of happiness to her their way into the vestry, where the Bishop be- heart, for “the end is not yet ;" and let the stows on the pale bride a fatherly kiss, with a good people who are left behind return to the relish which would have done his wife's heart marriage feast, and make exceeding merry over good to see, and then the signatures are placed the remnants thereof, and deem that they have in the great registry, and once more the great caught some reflection of the happiness that is organ breaks out with a solemn march of Spobr's, taken away from them. Let them utter pretty and, once more answering the music, pealed sayings about the bride's good looks and her out the mad jingle of the cathedral bells, with partner's life of happiness-surely for them, “Health and happiness to the bride and bride- “ where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise.” groom !” in their silvery tones, ringing as many Let them cry“O Hymenæe!" then, with all changes as could be produced out of the six their might; and whilst their elders drink the labouring ringers. And sweeter far than the red wine and make well-meaning, incoherent bells and the organ comes a heart-felt English speeches, let the youngsters bill and coo to cheer from the assembled crowd, led by sturdy their hearts' content, and whisper pretty things John Smith. And so, amidst pealing of bells about the late affair, and wish that the time was and sturdy cheers, the wedding party returns come for them to go and do likewise. to Oakland's Hall, to be graced for the last time In the servants' hall there is high festivity, by the sweet blossom that bloomed the fairest and later in the day a dance will be proposed, there.

when Jeames Jones will lead forth the fasciWhy linger over the details of the breakfast ? nating Melia, the bousemaid, and induct her As many good things, and foolish things too, into the mysteries of " Thread the Needle;" were said there as at any other-as much cham- and there will be much meat eaten, and much pagne was drunk from the tall crystal glasses, strong drink quaffed, and many things sung and as many healths and blessings bestowed and said peculiar to the servants' hall. But upon the handsome bride and manly bride. I don't imagine that, for all this, the Captain's

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