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Page 2. last line but one, for become read became.

45. line 4. from the bottom, after accompanied, add that of.

84.

86.

87.

88.

8. after imitation of, add this.

5. for Rowney, read Romney.

13. for betowed read bestowed.

9. of note, for unwillingly read unwilling.

SOME ACCOUNT

OF

THE LIFE

OF

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE

WILLIAM WINDHAM.

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WILLIAM WINDHAM, the lamented subject of this narrative, was the descendant of a line of ancestors which is traced to a very remote period. The name is derived from a town in Norfolk, generally written Wymondham, but pronounced Windham, at which place the family appears to have been settled as early as the eleventh, or the beginning of the twelfth century, Ailward de Wymondham having been a person of some consideration in the time of Henry the First. His posterity remained there till the middle of the fifteenth century, when one of them, in the reign of Henry the Sixth, purchased considerable estates on the north-east coast of Norfolk, in Felbrigg and its neighbourhood, which, from that time, became their principal residence. Among the Windhams of Felbrigg, many might be enumerated who

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distinguished themselves by services to their country in the army, the navy, and on the judicial bench; and from them descended not only the present noble family of Egremont, but others of considerable eminence, long since settled in distant parts of the kingdom, by whom the name of Windham has been preserved, though generally with a slight deviation from that orthography.

Colonel William Windham, an inheritor of the Felbrigg patrimony, and the son of Ash Windham, who had represented the county of Norfolk in Parliament, was a man of versatile talents and an ardent mind. He was the associate of the wits of his time, the friend and admirer of Garrick, and the distinguished patron of all manly exercises. In his father's lifetime, he had lived much on the continent, particularly in Spain. Of his proficiency in the language of that country, he gave proofs in some printed observations on Smollett's Translation of Don Quixote. While abroad, he entered as a Hussar officer into the service of the deserted, though finally successful, Maria Teresa, Queen of Hungary. This commission, at his father's desire, he at length very unwillingly relinquished; but his military ardour was revived many years afterwards, on the passing of the Act which established the Militia Force upon its present footing. Upon that occasion, which happened in the year 1757, he assisted his friend, the first Marquis Townshend, in förming a battalion of Militia in his native county, of which he afterwards become Lieutenant-Colonel. Though his military education had not been regular,

he not only proved an active and skilful officer, but distinguished himself as the author of a "Plan of Discipline composed for the use of the Militia of the county of Norfolk," which was much esteemed, and generally adopted by other corps of the establishment *.

Unhappily Colonel Windham's feeble con

*This work, which was published in 1760, is comprized in a quarto volume, and contains many plates, serving to illustrate the plan of exercise which Colonel Windham recommended. The dedication, "To the Right Honourable the Earl of Shaftsbury, and the other noble Lords who have exerted themselves in their respective counties as Lord-Lieutenants in the execution of the Militia Acts," is subscribed by Lord Townshend, who notices Colonel Windham in terms of warm commendation. An advertisement, signed "W. Windham," is dated the 24th August 1759, at Hilsea Barracks, to which place the battalion had proceeded upon the threat of an invasion; having the distinguished honour of being the first Militia corps that had marched out of its own county.

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That Colonel Windham's military instructions to his brotherofficers were not always observed according to his wishes, may be shewn by a ludicrous anecdote, which the writer of this narrative received from an old officer of the battalion, lately dead. The corps, on its march, having to pass in parade order before the King at Kensington, the Colonel took particular pains to perfect his officers in the manner of the salute. To his great mortification, however, he observed that one of his captains, (an honest country. gentleman) marched with infinite composure past His Majesty, without bestowing on him the slightest notice. Upon being called to account for this negligence, the officer denied the truth of the charge. "Do you think, Colonel Windham," said he, "I did not know the King as well as you did? How could I miss him? Had not he the G. R. onthis breast?" The worthy Captain had actually saluted a Beefeater!

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