The Upper Thames Valley ...

Przednia okładka
 

Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Popularne fragmenty

Strona 47 - I'll take the low road, And I'll be in Scotland afore ye, But me and my true love will never meet again On the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.
Strona 53 - Vive, vale. Si quid novisti rectius istis Candidus imperti ; si non his utere mecum.
Strona 11 - It is surely a representation of one of those prehistoric monsters commonly called dragons. Local tradition supports this opinion, for the hill just below it is called Dragon's Hill, and the story goes here that the dragon was slain by St. George.
Strona 11 - Anybody looking at the beak, the eye, the elongated body and tail of this curious figure must realise that it could never have been intended for a horse. It is surely a representation of one of those prehistoric monsters commonly called dragons. Local tradition supports this opinion, for the hill just below it is called Dragon's Hill, and the story goes that here the dragon was slain by St.
Strona 27 - The Roman strata, or paved roads, became the Saxon streets. This word street often enables us to recognize the lines of Roman road, which, straight as an arrow course, connect the chief strategic positions in the island Roman roads which do not bear the name of street are often called Port-ways." Although no old parishioner can recall these
Strona 7 - Barrows were only raised to the memory of exalted personages, and it seems probable that on the death of any king, or other illustrious individual, his corpse was 7 conveyed to these consecrated hills, and here buried near his ancestors.
Strona 15 - When the Ridgeway was first designed there may possibly have been no river to cross, for the Berkshire Downs were once connected with the Chiltern Hills and the Thames emptied itself into the Wash. The troubles of crossing only began when the river had undermined the cliff and broken through the Goring Gap to find an exit into the Kennet Valley.
Strona 36 - Packhorses and cattle were not allowed on them, for they are usually just wide enough for two mounted men to pass, not as we do to-day, keeping to the left, but probably " bridle hand to bridle hand," to lessen the danger of a sword thrust or stab in the back.
Strona 29 - Port ' indicated by the name Portweg ? All portways that I have come across, and they have been many, are invariably pointing to the town from which they get their name.
Strona 28 - GATTON, in the same neighbourhood, is the town at the passage. CATERHAM and GODSTONE may possibly be referred to the same root, as well as GATCOMBE in the Isle of Wight.

Informacje bibliograficzne