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Korp. For a worthy lady,

Keep. Madam, if 't please the queen to send the And one whom much I honour. 1

I know not what I thall incur to pass it, (bube, Pass. Pray you then,

Having no warrant.
Conduct me to the queen.

Paul. You need not fear it, fır:
Xeo. I may not, madam ; to the contrary The child was prisoner to the is onb; and is,
I have expreis commandment.

By law and process of great nature, thence
Puul. Here's ado,

Frce'd ad enfranchis'u; not a party to
To lock up honesty and honour from

The anger of the king ; ner guilty of,
The accels of gentle visitors ! -Is it law fu!, If any be, the trešpats of the queen.
Pray you, to see her women ? any of them? Kap. I do bclieve it.
Emilia?

Paul. Do not you fear; upon niine honour, I krep. So please you, madam, i

Will itand 'twixt you and Vanger. [2:xeunt. To put apart thele your attendants, I

SC Ε Ν Ε H.
Shall bring Emilia forth.
Ped. I pray you novi,

Tbe Paine
Call her : Withdraw yourselves. . [Exeunt Geni. Enter Léontes, wintigonus, Lords, and orber Al-
Kitp. And, madam, I muit

tendants. Be present at your conference.

Leo. Nor night, nor day, no reft: It is but Puul. Well, be it fo, prythee. Here is such ado,

weakness

[Exit Keuper. To bear the matter thus ; mere weakness, if To make no ftain a stain, as partes colexuring. The cause were not in being;---part o'the cause,

Re-enter Kreper, with Emilie. She, the adultress;--for the harlot king Dear gentlewoman, how fures our gracions lady? Is quite beyond mine arm, out of the blank

Emil. As well as one fo gre, and so forlorn, And level 2 of my brain, plot-proof: bit the May noid together: Oo her frigits, and griefs, I can hook to me: Say, that the were gone, (Which never tender lady hath borne gre.ter) Given to the fire, a moiety of my reit Slie is, sometining before her time, deliverdi. Might come to me again.--Who's there: : Paui. A buy.

Enter an Antendant, Emil. A daughter ; and a goodly babe,

Atten. My lord ? Lufts, and like to live : the queen receives

Leo. How does the boy? Mun comfort in't: fays, Vy poor p:iforer,

Atten. He took good reft to-night; 'tis hord, I 3.noient as you.

His fickne's is ditchug'd. Paul. I dare be sworn :

Lco. To see his nobleness! Tloeie glangerous unsafe lunes o' the king! be- Conceiving the dishonour of his mother, ihreix them!

Heitraight declin'd, droop'd, cook it deply; He must be told on't, and he shall: the office Faften's and fix' the ihame on't in himnieli: Beomes a woman bert: I'll take't upon me: Threw off his spirit, his appetite, his Reep, If i prove honey-mouthl, let my tongue b'itter; And downright languish’d. -- Leave me colely: 50, And never to my red-look' anger be

[Exie tiendunt. The trumpet any more:- 'ray voll, Emilia, See how he fares.--Fye, fye! no thought of him;Commend my best obedience to the queen; The very thought of my revenges that way If the dares trutt me with her little babe,

Recoil upon me: in lumieli too mighty; l'll Mew't the king, and undertake to be And in his partie., his alliance,--Let him be, Her advocate to th' loudest: We do not know Lutil a time may jerve : for present vengeance, How he may often at the right o'the childi Tike it on her. Camillo and Polixenes The filence often of pure innocence

Laugh at me; make their paitime at my forrow: Perfundes, when speaking fails.

They should not laugh, if I could reach them; nor Emil. Mott worthy madam,

Shall the, williin my porter. Your honour, and your goodneis, is so evident,

Enter Paulina, quith a Child. That your free undertaking cannot miss

I ord. You muít not enter.

me; A thriving iflue; there is no lady living,

Paal. Nay rather, good ny lords, he second ca So meet for this grea: errani: Please your ladyfrip Fer you bis tyrannous patiion, more, alas, To visit the next room, l'll presently

Than the queen's life? a gracious innocent boul; Acquaint the queen of your most noble offer ; More free, than he is jealous. Who, but to-day, hamner'd of this delign;

Ant. That's enough.

(manded Bu durft nor tenipt a minister of honous,

stein. Madam, he hath not fiepe to-night; comLeft the should be deny d.

None thould come at him. Paal. Tell lier, Emilia,

Porul. Not to hoi, good fir, 17! use that tongue I have: if wit flow from it, I come to bring him fleep. 'Tis such as you,-As huidness from my busom, let it not be doubled. That creep like Madows by him, and do ligh 1 hall do good.

At each his neediefs heavings,—such as you
Emil. Now be you bleft for it!

Nourith the caule of his awaking: I
TP to the queen: please you come something nearer. Do come with words as med cinal as true;
II. c. frenzy, Landey. 2 Blank and level are terins of archery.

Honent,

2:3

Honest, as either; to purge him of that humo:ir, You'd call your children yours. 'I hat preffes hini from fleep.

Leo. A nett of traitors!
Leo. What noile there, ho?

Ant. I am nonc, by this good light.
Paul. No noise, my lord; but needful conference Paul. Nor I ; nor any,
About fome goslips for your highness.

But one, that's here; and that's bimself : for he Leo. How?

The sacred honour of himielf, his queen's, Away with that audacious lady! Antigonus, His hopeful son's, his babe's, betrays to flander, I charg'd thee, that she should not come about me; Whose sting is sharper than the sword's; and will not I knew, she would.

(For, as the case now stands, it is 4 curse sine. I told her fo, my lord,

He cannot be compellid to't) once remove On your displeasure's peril, and on mine,

The root of his opinion, which is rotten, She should not visit you.

As ever oak, or stone, was found. Lo. What, canst not rule her?

Leo. A callat, Paul. From all dishonesty, he can: in this, Of boundleis tongue; who late hath heat her husband, (Unless he take the course that you have done, And now baits me!--This brat is none of mine ; Commit me, for committing honour) trust it, It is the issue of Polixenes : He shall not rule me.

Hence with it ; and, together with the dam, Ant. Lo you now; you hear!

Commit them to the fire. When she will take the rein, I let her run ;

Paul. It is yours; But the'll not stumble.

And, might we lay the old proverb to your charge, Parl. Good my liege, I com@gmu

So like you, 'tis the worse. --Behold, my lords, And, I beseech you, hear me, who profess Although the print be little, the whole matter Myself your loyal servant, your physician, And copy of the father : eye, nose, lip, Your most obedient counsellor ; yet that dares The trick of his frown, his forehead ; nay, the valley, Les appear so, in comforting your eviis, The pretty dimples of his chin, and cheek ; his Than fuch as most ieem yours :--I say, I come

smiles ; From your good queen.

The very mould and frame of hand, nail, finger :Leo. Good queen!

[good queen; And, thou, good goddess nature, which hast made it Paul. Good queen, my lord, good queen! 1 say, So like to him that got it, if thou hast And would by conbat make her good, fo were I The ordering of the mind too, 'mongst all colours A man, the werit ' about you.

No yellow 6 in 't ; left the suspect, as he does,
Leo. Force her hence.

Her children not her husband's !
Paul. Let him, tlxit makes but trises of his eyes, Lio. A gross hag !
First hand me : on mine ou n accord, I'll off ; And, lozel 7, thou art worthy to be hang'd,
But, firft, I'll do my errand. The good queen, That wilt not stay her tongue.
For she is good, hath brought you forth a daughter; Ant. Hang all the husbands,
Here 'tis ; commends it to your bleiling.

That cannot do that feat, you'll leave yourself
[Laying down the child. Hardly one subject.
Lro. Out!

Leo. Once more, take her hence. A mankind witch?!Hence with her, out o' door : Paul. A most unworthy and unnatural lord A moil intelligencing balid !

Can do no more. Paul. Not so :

Leo. I'll have thee burnt. I am as ignorant in that, as you

Paul. I care not : In so intitling me: and no less honest

It is an heretick, that makes the fire, Than you are mad ; which is enough, I'll warrant, Not she, which burns in 't. I'll not call you tyrant ; As this world goes, to pass for honest.

But this most cruel usage of your queen Lio, Traitors!

(Not able to produce more accusation (vours Will you not push her out? give her the bastard :-|Than your own weak-hing'd fancy) something las

[To Antigomus. Of tyranny, and will ignoble make you,
Thou, dotard, thou art woman-tyr'd 3, unroosted Yea, scandalous to the world.
By thy dame Partlet here, take up the bastard; Leo. On your allegiance,
Take't up, I say; give't to thy

Out of the chamber with her. Were I a tyrant, Paul. For ever

Where were her life? The durit not call me so, Unvenerable be thy hands, if thou

If she did know me one., Away with her. Tak'st up the princess, by that forced s baseness Paul. I pray you, do not push me; I'll be gone. Which he has put upon't!

Look to your babe, my lord ; 'tis yours : Jove Leo. He dreads his wife.

[all doubt,

send ber Paul. So, I would, you did; then, 'twere part | A better guiding spirit!—What need these hands

crone.

I Horst here implies louc?. 2 The phrase of mankind-woman is still in use in some counties, for a woman violent, ferocious, and mischievous; which is its meaning in this passage. 3 Worran-tyrd is synonymous with the modern hen-pecked. 4 A croan means an old toothless theep: thence an old

si.e. falje baleness. o 'Yelow is the colour of jealousy. ? Lozel is an ancient term of cooleinpi, mçaning a worthless fellow.

You,

Hoidan.

You, that are thus lo tender o'er his follies,

Ant. I will, my lord.

[the faid Will never do him good, not one of you.

Leo. Mark, and perform it! (seest thou ?) for So, fo :--Farewel ; we are gone. [Exit. Of any point in't shall not only be

Leo. Thou, traitor, halt set on thy wife to this.-- Death to thyself, but to thy lewd-tongu'd wife ; My child ? away with't!--even thou, that hast Whom, for this time, we pardon. We enjoin thee, A heart fo tender o'er it, take it hence,

As thou art liegeman to us, that thou carry And see it instantly consum'd with fire;

This female bastard hence ; and that thou bear it Even thou, and none but thou. Take it up straight : To some remote and desert place, quite out Within this hour bring me word 'tis done, Of our dominions; and that there thou leave it, (And by good teftimony) or I'll seize thy life, Without more mercy, to its own protection, With what thou else call'st thine : If thou refuse, And favour of the climate. As by strange fortune And wilt encounter with my wrath, say so ; It came to us, I do in justice charge thee, The battard brains with these my proper hands On thy soul's peril, and thy body's toiture, Shall I dah out. Go, take it co the fire; That thou commend it strangely' to some place, For thou sett'st on thy wife.

Where chance may nurse, or end it : Take it up. Ans. I did not, fir :

Ant. I swear to do this, though a present death These lords, my noble fellows, if they please, Had been more merciful.--Come on, poor babe : Can clear me in't.

Some powerful spisit inftruct the kires and ravens Lord. We can; my royal liege,

To be thy nurses ! Wolves, and bears, they say, He is not guilty of her coming hither.

Cafting their savageness aside, have done Les. You are liars all.

[dit : Like offices of pity.--Sir, be prosperous Lo-d. 'Beseech your highness, give us better cre- In more than this deed does require ! and blessing, We have always truly serv'd you ; and beseech Against this cruelty, fight on thy side, So to esteem of us : And on our knees we beg, Poor ching, condemn'd to lofs ! (As recompence of our dear services,

[Exit, with the child. Paft, and to come) that you do change this purpose ; Leo. No, I'll not rear Which being so horrible, fo bloody, must

Another's illue. Lead on to some foul illue: We all kneel.

Enter a Melenger. Les. I am a feather for each wind that blows Mef. Please your highness, posts, Shall I live on, to see this battard kneel

From those you sent to the oracle, are come And call me father better burn it now,

An hour since : Cleomenes and Dion, Than curse it then. But, be it ; let it live : Being well arriv'd from Delphos, are both landed, It shall not neither.--You, fir, come you hither : Hatting to the court.

To Antigonus. Lord. So please you, sir, their speed You, that have been so tenderly officious

Hath been beyond account. With lady Margery, your midwife, there,

L.co. Twenty-three days To save this bastard's life :--for 'tis a baltard, They have been abfent : 'Tis good speed ; foretels, So lure as this beard's grey,---what will you ad- | The great Apollo suddenly will have To save this brat's life?

(venture The truth of this appear. Prepare you, lords ; Ant. Any thing, my lori,

Summon a feilion, that we may arraign That my ability may undergo,

Our most dilloyal lady : for, as the hath
And noblenefs impose : at least, thus much ; Been publickly accus'd, so Thall lhe have
I'll pawn the little blood which I have left, A jult and open trial. While the lives,
To save the innocent : any thing possible.

My heart will be a burden to me.
Les. It shall be possible : Swear by this sword, And think upon my bidding,
Thou wilt perform my bidding.

[Exeunt.

Leave me ;

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reverence

SC EN E I,

(Methinks, I so should term them) and the A Part of Sicily, near ibe Sca-fide. of the grave wearers. O, the sacrifice ! Enter Cleomenes, and Dion.

How ceremonious, solemn, and unearthly

It was i’ the offering !
Cles 'HE climate's delicate; the air most sweet ; Cleo. But, of all, the burst

Fertile the ine; the temple much sur- And the ear-deafning voice o' the oracle,
The common prajse it bears.

[paffing Kin to Jove's thunder, so surpriz'd my sense, Disn, I shall report,

That I was nothing.
For most it caught me, the celostial habits, Dign. If the event o'the journey

TH

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Prove as successful to the queeri,-0, be't so!-- | Who please to come and hear. For life, I prize it As it hath been to us rare, pleasant, speedy, As I ucigh grief, which I would spare 3 : for honou, The time is worth the use on't.

'Tis a derivative from me to mine, Cleo. Great Apollo,

And only that I stand for. I appeal Tr all to the best! These proclamations, To your own confcience, fır, beforc Polixenes So forcing faults upon llermione,

Came to your court, how I was in your grace, I little like.

How merited to be so: Since he came, Dion. The violent carriage of it

With what encounter so uncurrent I Will clear, or end, the business : When the oracle, Have strain'd, to appear thus : if one jot beyond (Thus by Apollo's great divine feald up)

The bound of honour; or, in act, or will, Shall the contents discover, something rare, That way inclining; heidned be tlie hearts Even then, willinh to knowledge.-G0,-fresh Of all that hear me, and my near'lt of kin horses ;

Cry, Fye upon my grave! And gracious be the issue !

[Exeunt. Leo. I ne'er heard yet,

That any of thele bolder vices wanted
S CE N E II.

Less impudence to gainsay what they did,
A Court of Justice.

Than to perform it first.
Leonies, I ords, and Officers, appear properly seated. Her. Thul's true enough;

Leo. This feriion (to our great grief, we pronounce) Though 'tis a saying, fir, not due to me. Even puines againít oi.r heart : The party try'd,

Leo. You will not own it. The daughter of a king; our wife; and one Her. More than mistress of, Of us too much belovod. Let us be clear'd Which comes to me in name of fault, I must not Of being tyrannous, since we to openly

At all acknowledge. For Poliaenes, Proceed in justice; which shall have due course, (With whom I am accus’d) I do confess, Even to the guilt, or the purgation.

I lov'd him, as in honour he requir'd; Prodrce the prisoner.

With such a kind of love, as might be ome
Ofi. It is bis highneís' pleasure, that the queen A lady like me; with a love, even such,
Appear in perion here in court.--Silence! So, and no other, as yourself commanded :
Herrnone is broug be is, quorded: L'aulina and Which not to have done, I think, had been in me

Ladies at
attending

Both disobedience and ingratitude, [[poke, Lro. Read the indictment.

To you, and towards your friend; whose love had OF. “ Hernjone, queen to the worthy Leontes, Even since it could speak, from an infant, freely, « king of Sicilia, thou art here accused and ar- That it was yours. Now, for conspiracy, “ raigned of high treason, in committing adultery I know not how it tastes; though it be diind " with Polixenes, king of Bohemia; and conspi- For me to try how: all I know of it, “ ring with Camillo ti take away the life of our Is, that Camillo was an honest man;

Sovereign lord the king, thy royal husband : And, why he left your court, the gods themselves, « the pretence 2 whereof being by circunstances Wotting no more than 1, are ignorant. “ partly laid open, thou, Hermione, contrary to Les. You knew of his departure, as you know " the faith and allegiance of a true lubject, diaft What you have undertaen to do in his abience. counsel and nid them, for their better safety, to

Her. Sir, “ fly away by night.",

You speak a language that I understand not :
Her. Since what I am to say, muł be but that My life stands in the level 4 of your dreams,
Which contradicts my accufation ; and

Which I'll lay down.
The teftimony on my part, no other (me Leo. Your actions are my dreams;
Bus what comes froin myself; it shall scarce boot You had a bastard by Polixenes,

[shame, To say, No. guilty: mine integrity,

And I but dream'd it :- As you were part all Being counted falsehood, ihall, as I express it, (Those of your fact s are fo) so part al truth: Be so receiv’d. But thus---if powers divine Which to deny, concerns more than avails : for as Behold our human actions, as they do)

Thy brat hath been cast out, like to itself, I doubt not then, but innocence hall make No father owning it, (which is, indeed, False accufation blush, and tyranny

More criminal in thee, than it) so thou Tremble a patience.---\u, my lord, best know, Shalt feel our justice; in whose easiest partage, (Who least will feeni to do so) my jut life Look for no less than death. Hath been .ts continent, as chaste, as true,

Her. Sir, spare your th: eats ; As I am now urbapry; which is more

The bug, which you will fright me with, I seek. Than history can pat: crn, though devisit, To me can life be no commodity : And play'd to take ipetuitats : For betvid me,-. The crown and comfort of my life, your favour, A fellow of the royal bed, which ove

I do give loft ; for I do feel it gone, A moiety of the throne, a great kiris's daughter, But know not how it went : My second joy, The mother to a bopeful prince,-here standing, And first-fruits of my body, from his presence To prate and talk for life, and honou, 'fore I am barrd, like one infectious : My third comfort, rie.

€. equal. 2 i. e. the design. 3 To spare means here, to let it go, to quit the polefion of it. 4 To be in inc level meuils to de uithin the reaun. Faci is here put for guilt.

Starra

Starr'd most unluckily, is from my breast, Her heart is but o'er-charg'd; she will recoverThe innocent milk in its most innocent mouth,

[Excunt Paulina and Ladies, with Hermians Huld out to murder : Myself on every post I have too much believ'd mine own suspicion:Proclain d a strumpet ; with immodest hatred, 'Beleech you, tenderly apply to her The chuld-bed privilege deny'd, which 'longs Some remedies for life. -Apollo, pardon To women of all falhion :-Lastly, hurried My great profaneness gainst thine oracle!liere to this place, i' the open air, before I'll reconcile me to Polixenes ; liuve got strength of limit'. Now, my liege, New woo my queen ; recall the good Canuillo; Tull me what bleflings I have here alive, Whom I proclaim a man of truth, of mercy : That I mould fear to die? Therefore, proceed. For, being traníported by nay jealousies But yet tear this; mittake me not; -No!life, To bloody thoughts and to revenge, I chose I prize is not „ frik:--but for me honour, Camillo for the minister, to poison (v nucli I would iree) if I should be condemn'd My friend Polixenes · which had been done, l'pun tur mile: ; all proofs sleeping else,

But that the gool mind of Camillo tardy'd But what your jealoulies Wike, I tvil yoll, My switcoininind; thougli I with death, and with 'Tis rigour, and not lat,--Your l10nous all, Reward, did threste'i and encourge him, I do refer me to the oracle;

Set doing i?, and being done: he, molt humane, Apollu be my judge.

and fill'd writi honour, to my kingly guest Enter Dion and Clonencs.

Linclaspii my practice; quit luis fortunes here, Lord. This your request

Which you knew great; and to the certain hazard Is altogether juit : therefore, bring forth, Of all incertainties himlelf commended, And in Apollo's name, liis oracie.

So richer than liis logour:---llow he glitters Her. The emperor of Rutsia was my father : Through my dark rust! and how his piety Oh, that he were alive, and here beholding Does my deeds make the blacker! His daugliter's trial ! that he did but fce

kic-inter Puilinu. Ttie tiatneis 2 of my misery; yet with eyes

Purul. Woe the while ! Oi pity, not revenge!

(justice, O, uit my lace; left my heart, cracking it, w You here thall swear upon the tword of Break too! Tilut you, Cleomenes and Dion, have [brought Lud. What fit is this, good lady? [me Ben both at Delphos; and from therce have Paul. What itudied torments, tyrant, halt for This teal'd-up oracle, by the hand deliver'd What wheels? racks? fires? What Aying? boils Of great Apollo; prieit; and that, lince then, In leds, oi oils: whatoki, or newer torture [ing? You have not dar'd to break the holy leal,

Mult I receive; wote every word deierves Nor read the secrets in 't.

To taste of thy moft worst? Thy tyranny C... Dion. All this we swear,

Together working with thy jealousies,Lús Break up the seals, and read.

Funcie too weak for boys, too green and ille “ Hermione is chatte, Polixenes blamelers, Fer guls of nine!-0, think, win they have done * Cimillo a true subject, Leonies a jealous tyrant, ....d then run m.id, indved; stark mad! for all “ his io.aene babe truly begotten; and the king Thy by-gone fooleries were but ípices of it. " thall live without an heir, if that, which is lost, Thit thou betray'dit l'elixenes, 'twas nothing; be not found."

That did but ihew thue, of a fool, inconstant, Lords. Now ble led be the great Apollo! And damnable ungrateful. nor was 't much, fler. Praised!

Thou ifould't have poiton'u good Camillo's honour, Les Halt thou read truth?

To have hin kill a king; poor treipatser, f. Ay, my lord; even to as iî is here set down. More monitrous ftanding by: whereof I reckon

Leo. There is no truth at all i'the oracle : The caiting forth to crows thy baby daughter, The seffion hall proceed; this is mere falsehood. To be or none, or little; though a devil Enter Servant.

Would have thed water out of fire, ere don't: Ser. My lord the king, the king!

Nor is't directly laid to thee, the death Leo. What is the business?

Of the young prince; whore honourable thoughts Ser. O fir, I shall be hated to report it : (Thoughts high for one fo tender) cleft the heart, The prince your ion, with mere conceit and fear That could conceive, a grofs and foolish fire Of the queen's speed ?, is gone.

Biemiih'd his gracious dam: this is not, no, Lio. How! gone?

Laid to thy antwer: But the laf, --1, lord, Ser. Is dead.

When I have faid, cry woe!--the queen, the queen, Leo. Apollo's angry; and the heavens themselves. The sweeteft, dearest creature's dead; -and vengeDo ftrike at my injustice.Huw now there? Not drop down yet.

Cance for 't [Heimiora fuiris. Lord. The higher powers forbid ! [outh, Paul. This news is mortal to the queen ;---Look Puil. I say, she's dead; l'll twear it: if word, nor And see what death is doing.

(down, Prevail not, go and see: if you can bring Lo. Take her hence:

Tincture, or lustre, in her lip, her eye,

I limi! is here put for limb. gucca's trial.

2 j. e. the loures of my miserye

3 Meaning, of the event of the

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