Byron and the Bible: A Compendium of Biblical Usage in the Poetry of Lord Byron

Przednia okładka
Investigates Byron's literary references to the Bible, using Paul E. More's 1905 edition of the works of Byron. The author alphabetizes Byron's works and catalogs in sequence all biblical references from those works. Each reference is given its own number, with the corresponding biblical equivalent succeeding it. Except for extremely long passages, each reference quotes the pertinent material from both the Bible and Byron. With cross index, author's preface, statistical analysis, and bibliography.

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Acknowledgments
1
Guide to the Use of the Compendium
23
Childe Harolds Pilgrimage
35
The Corsair
51
English Bards and Scotch Reviewers
89
Hebrew Melodies
109
Old Testament cont
112
The Lament of Tasso
122
Philippians
219
English Bards and Scotch Reviewers
222
Thessalonians
227
Hebrew Melodies
228
New Testament cont
232
Timothy
237
Marino Faliero Doge of Venice
238
Peter
248

Marino Faliero Doge of Venice
130
Mazeppa
136
The Morgante Maggiore
142
Sardanapalus
150
The Siege of Corinth
156
Werner or The Inheritance
166
Don Juan
192
Matthew
204
Galatians
210
Ode on Venice
251
Sonnet on Chillon
259
Peter
266
The Waltz
267
Numbers
274
New Testament cont
285
A Major Tables
297
New Testament Phrases in Byrons Poetry
313
Prawa autorskie

Informacje o autorze (1978)

English poet and dramatist George Gordon, Lord Byron was born January 22, 1788, in London. The boy was sent to school in Aberdeen, Scotland, until the age of ten, then to Harrow, and eventually to Cambridge, where he remained form 1805 to 1808. A congenital lameness rankled in the spirit of a high-spirited Byron. As a result, he tried to excel in every thing he did. It was during his Cambridge days that Byron's first poems were published, the Hours of Idleness (1807). The poems were criticized unfavorably. Soon after Byron took the grand tour of the Continent and returned to tell of it in the first two cantos of Childe Harold (1812). Instantly entertained by the descriptions of Spain, Portugal, Albania, and Greece in the first publication, and later travels in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy, the public savored Byron's passionate, saucy, and brilliant writing. Byron published the last of Childe Harold, Canto IV, in 1818. The work created and established Byron's immense popularity, his reputation as a poet and his public persona as a brilliant but moody romantic hero, of which he could never rid himself. Some of Byron's lasting works include The Corsair, Lara, Hebrew Melodies, She Walks In Beauty, and the drama Manfred. In 1819 he published the first canto of Don Juan, destined to become his greatest work. Similar to Childe Harold, this epic recounts the exotic and titillating adventures of a young Byronica hero, giving voice to Byron's social and moral criticisms of the age. Criticized as immoral, Byron defended Don Juan fiercely because it was true-the virtues the reader doesn't see in Don Juan are not there precisely because they are so rarely exhibited in life. Nevertheless, the poem is humorous, rollicking, thoughtful, and entertaining, an enduring masterpiece of English literature. Byron died of fever in Greece in 1824, attempting to finance and lead the Byron Brigade of Greek freedom fighters against the Turks.

Informacje bibliograficzne