History of Europe, from the Fall of Napoleon, in 1815, to the Accession of Louis Napoleon, in 1852

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W. Blackwood & Sons, 1854
 

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Effects of the change upon the colonial empire of England
9
Still greater results of the Freetrade policy of England
10
Vast extension of the United States of America
12
Vast increase of Russia during the same period
13
Continued increase of Russia from the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848
14
necessity
15
Their great frequency and extent
16
Causes of the fall of Louis Philippe
17
Calamitous effects of the Revolution of 1848 in Europe
18
Extreme violence of the Revolution in Germany
19
Successful stand against the revolutionary spirit in England and France
20
Restoration of military power in Austria
21
Restoration of military despotism in France by Louis Napoleon
22
Great increase of external dangers from the effects of the Revolution of 1848
23
Dangers of Great Britain in particular 25
26
Extraordinary change in the national mind in this respect
27
Dangers springing from the Freetrade system
28
Dangers arising from the change in our foreign policy
30
Gold mines of California and Australia
32
Way in which this is brought about
33
Europe in the sixteenth century
34
Vast effects of the expansion of the currency during the war
35
the peace
36
Amount of that contraction
37
necessary
38
Hopeless prospects of industry in Great Britain
39
Vast blessings which its discovery has introduced
42
Proof of this from statistical considerations
43
What if the case had been otherwise ?
45
Influence of this law on the fate of particular nations
46
Effect of general education on general morality
48
Proof of this from various countries
50
Composition of the Chamber of Peers
51
Reasons of this peculiarity in human nature
52
previous prejudices of the historians of the Reformation
53
General power of thought over mankind
54
Great consequent influence of mind on human affairs
55
Ease with which the press may be perverted to the purposes of des potism
56
Great effect of the discovery of steam and electric communication
57
Increased corresponding activity in the principles which counteract evil
58
Way in which this was brought about
59
General longing after representative institutions ib 57 Doubts which their general failure has excited among men
60
Effect of representative institutions in Britain
61
Its effects in America
63
Rise of divisions and passions of race
64
Great error in supposing national character depends on institutions
65
Wars of races are the great passion of Eastern Europe
66
Doubts as to the wisdom of representative institutions
67
Real character good and evil of representative institutions
68
Great effect of the social passions of Europe in propelling its inhabitants to the New World
69
And of the discovery of the gold mines of California and Australia
71
What if the case had been otherwise ?
72
Increasing influence of Russian conquest
73
Migratory propensities of men in the youth of civilisation
75
Corresponding moving propensities in the maturity of civilisation 776
78
Destiny of the race of Japhet in reference to Christianity
79
Increasing influence of religion in Europe
81
Differences of the era of this history and that of the last
82
The age of general causes has succeeded that of great men
83
Not necessary as a general measure of finance
100
Reflections on this subject
106
Which is coldly received by the Chamber
108
Reflections on this subject
130
Marriage of the Princess Charlotte of Wales
136
Spafield riots
142
VOL I
145
Lord Exmouths preparations for an attack
148
Continuance of the action and positions taken by the ships
154
Honours bestowed on Lord Exmouth and the fleet
161
Which occasions a universal reaction against Napoleon and his adhe
167
Lists of persons to be accused prepared by Fouché and sanctioned by
178
Ordinances regarding the Chamber of Peers
184
Reorganisation of the army into departmental legions
190
441
192
Departure of Marshal Brune for Paris
196
Temper of France during the elections
202
Ministry of the Duke de Richelieu
208
Exorbitant demands of Austria and the lesser powers
214
Treaties regarding the Ionian Isles a Russian subsidy and Napoleon
220
Law suspending individual liberty
233
Discussion on the acts in the Peers
239
The provincial deputies
245
His trial before the Chamber of Peers
251
Reflections on this event
257
Sir Robert Wilson Mr Hutchinson and Mr Bruce enable him to escape
263
The King lands
269
Death of MoutonDuvernet and General Chartrand
275
108
278
Project of the Royalists
283
147
286
Answer of the Ministers and their counter project
290
Exaggerations of General Donnadieu and needless severities
296
Adoption of these principles by the King and preparations for carrying
302
Consternation of the ultraRoyalists and dismissal of Chateaubriand
308
CHAPTER IV
314
Which in ignorance are supported by the operative manufacturers
319
Reason of this frequent disappointment of general wishes
320
Continued distress and discontent in the country
322
Meeting of Parliament and attack on the PrinceRegent
323
Reflections on this subject Error at that period in the English law
335
Good effects of the suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act
336
Motion of Mr Brougham regarding the trade and manufactures of the country
337
Establishment of savings banks and diminished severity of punishment in criminal cases
339
His entry into Paris
340
His character as an orator and political philosopher
341
Death of the Princess Charlotte
342
Universal grief of the nation at this event
343
Improved condition of the country in the end of 1817 and spring of 1818
344
Cause of this increased prosperity
345
Steps of the Bank towards cash payments
346
3437 Argument for the resumption of cash payments by the Opposition 347349
347
3840 Answer by the Ministers 350351
350
Bill of Indemnity for persons seized under the suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act
353
Military and naval forces voted and revenue
355
Grant of a million to build new churches
357
Treaty with Spain for the abolition of the slave trade
359
Alien Bill and Mr Broughams committee concerning charities des
360
Efforts of Sir Samuel Romilly to obtain a relaxation of our criminal code
361
Death of Sir Samuel Romilly
362
His character ib 50 Death and character of Lord Ellenborough
365
his early life
366
Commencement of the debates on the currency question
372
His speech on the occasion continued
378
Decision of Parliament on the subject
391
400401
400
True principles on the subject
407
The succours to the insurgents still continue Reflections on this sub
415
Exemplifications of this vicissitude in the history of France and England
420
CHAPTER V
421
Progress in other branches of manufacture
426
His merits and defects
432
his vast and noble genius
438
Mrs Hemans
445
Dr Brown
451
His character as a political philosopher
457
Rise of the learned reviews and lengthened essays
463
Sydney Smith
469
Napier
480
Mitford
486
The new school of novelists
493
Miss Austen and Miss Sinclair
500
Chalmers
506
Copley Fielding Williams Thomson
512
Flaxman
518
Miss ONeil
523
Kean ib 105 Kean 106 Miss Helen Faucit
524
Decline of the drama in England and its causes
525
its causes
526
Its great effect on society
527
Increasing liberalism of the higher ranks
528
Influence in society of the great Whig houses
529
causes of the difference
530
And advantage of the Whigs in this respect
531
Rise and influence of the newspaper press
532
It was nearly all on the popular side
533
Ephemeral decorations of such literature
534
Reflections arising from this ib 118 What remedy is there for these evils ?
535
CHAPTER VI
537
Democratic basis on which the elective franchise was founded
538
The elections of 1815 and measures taken to secure them
539
Efforts of the Royalists and Liberals
540
Internal government after the coup détat of 5th September
541
Great distress in France in the winter of 181617
543
Opening of the Chambers
544
Change in the style of history Hallam
545
Law of elections of 5th February 1817
546
1213 Argument of the Ministers in support of the measure
547
1416 Answer by the Royalists 548550
548
It is passed
551
Reflections on this law ib 19 Laws on personal freedom and the liberty of the press
552
Projects of laws regarding the liberty of the press and personal freedom
553
2122 Argument against the law on the liberty of the press by the Opposi tion
554
2324 Answer of the Ministerialists
555
Extreme scarcity and measures of Government in consequence
556
Consoling features even in the ruin of the Old World 316
557
Concordat with Rome
558
Extreme difficulty regarding the finances
559
Efforts of the Emperor Alexander and the Duke of Wellington to obviate these difficulties
560
The Budget of 1817
564
Modification of the Ministry
570
the law of recruiting
576
The bill is passed into a law
582
AixlaChapelle and its concourse of illustrious foreigners
589
Secret military Protocol
595
Attempted assassination of the Duke of Wellington
601
Difficulties of the Duke de Richelieu
607
Movement against the Electoral Law in the Peers
613
Answer on the part of the Ministerialists
614
The proposition is carried and vast sensation throughout France
615
Measures of the Cabinet and the Liberals in the Chamber of Deputies ib 8891 Argument in support of M Barthélémys proposal 616618
616
9294 Argument of the Ministers on the other side 619620
619
Adoption of M Barthélémys proposition and defeat of Ministers on the fixing of the financial year
621
Measures of the Government
622
Great majority in the Chamber of Deputies for Ministers
623
Great and lasting results of the changes already made in France ib 99 Repeated coups détat in France since the Restoration
624
The coups détat were all on the popular side
625
Causes of this peculiarity
626

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