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Sec. II. Includes two chapters, containing an account of John the Baptist, and of the entrance of Christ upon his public ministry, ch. iii. iv. In this section there are two things worthy of remark.

1. The character and ministry of John, ch. iii.

2. The baptism and temptation of Christ, ch. iii. iv. Sec. III. Contains a record of the discourses and miracles of Christ, until his transfiguration, ch. v.—xvii. The most remarkable things in this section are,

1. Our Lord's sermon on the mount, ch. v.-vii,

2. A record of a series of miracles performed by Christ, ch. viii. ix.

3. The commission of the twelve apostles to preach the gospel, ch. x.

4. The confession of faith made by the apostles, ch. xvi.

5. The transfiguration of Christ, when Moses and Elijah appeared conversing upon the manner and design of his death, at Jerusalem, for our redemption, ch. xvii.

Sec. IV. Relates various discourses and miracles of Christ, from his transfiguration to two days before his crucifixion, ch. xviii.-xxv. The most remarkable things recorded in this section are.

1. The entrance of Christ into Jerusalem, ch. xxi.

2. The Saviour's prophecy of the destruction of the city and temple, on account of the infidelity and wickedness of the Jews, ch. xxiv.

3. The description of the general judgment, ch. xxv. Sec. V. Relates the sufferings, death, and resurrection of Christ. The most remarkable things contained in this affecting section are,

1. The awful wickedness of Judas, in betraying his Master with a kiss, ch. xxvi.

2. The sinful weakness of Peter in denying his Lord,

ch. xxvi.

3. The dreadful criminality of the Jews and of Pilate, in condemning and crucifying Christ, ch. xxvii.

4. The remorse of Judas, and his testimony to the innocency of Jesus, ch. xxvii.

5. The resurrection of Christ, the miracles by which

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t was attended, the proofs of its reality, and his commission to his apostles, ch. xxviii.

As Matthew wrote for the confirmation of the Hebrew christians, it was with peculiar propriety that he was directed to show how Christ descended from Abraham, by David; and that he was born at Bethlehem as foretold by the prophet Micah. Those passages also in the prophetical writings, which refer to the various offices and works of the Messiah, are more particularly noticed by this evangelist than by the others, for the satisfaction of the Jews

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- iii. 3.

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. xi. 10.

Isa. ix. 1, 2.

24.

Mic. vii. 6.

44.

Ps. cx. 1.

Ps. xli. 9.

xxiv. 15.

Prov. ix. 2.

Deut. xxv. 5.

Dan. ix. 27.

Mal. iii. 1.

xxvii. 9.

Zec. xi. 11,

12.

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The gospel according to Mark is supposed to have been written about A. D. 61, under the direction of the apostle Peter, for the use of the Gentiles; to whose conversion the ministry of that apostle had been effectual. It records most of the things contained in Matthew, with some few additional particulars, but in a more concise form. Considering the simplicity and perspicuity of the writing, and the momentous subjects which it narrates,

this gospel has been called "the shortest and clearest, the most marvellous, and at the same time the most satisfactory history in the world."

Mark is divided into sixteen chapters, containing three principal sections.

Section I. Records an account of the ministry of John the Baptist, and of the baptism and temptation of Christ, ch. i. 1-13.

Sec. II. Relates the miracles and discourses of Christ, from the commencement of his public ministry, to his visit to Jerusalem at the last passover, ch. i. 14.-x. In this section some of the most remarkable things recorded are,

1. Some particulars relating to John the Baptist, ch. vi. 2. The account of the young ruler, who sacrificed the kingdom of heaven from his attachment to his worldly wealth, ch. x.

Sec. III. Contains an account of the triumphal entry of Christ into Jerusalem, his parables and discourses there, and his condemnation, death, resurrection, and commission to his apostles, all of which are most important and remarkable, ch. xi.-—xvi.

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The gospel according to Luke, was written for the use of the Gentile christians, and dedicated to Theophilus, a nobleman converted to the faith of Christ. It is divided into twenty-four chapters, containing four principal sections.

Section I. Relates the particulars of the birth of John the Baptist, and of Jesus, and of their early history until

the baptism of Christ, ch. i.-iii. The things most remarkable in this section are,

1. The appearance of the angel Gabriel to the father of John, and afterwards to the virgin Mary, ch. i.

2. The birth of John, after which his father's speech was restored, ch. i.

3. The birth of Jesus, which an angel announced to the shepherds, ch. ii.

4. The wisdom of Jesus in conversation with the Jewish doctors in the temple, when he was only twelve years of age, ch. iii.

Sec. II. Records many of the discourses and miracles of Christ, during the three years of his ministry, until he went into Judea, to his last passover, ch. iv.-ix. The things most remarkable in this section are,

1. The first discourse of Jesus Christ in the synagogue of Nazareth, where he had been brought up, ch. iv.

2. The coming of John's disciples to Christ when he was performing many miracles, ch. vii.

3. The healing of the man who had been possessed by a legion of devils, ch. viii.

Sec. III. Relates the discourses, parables, and works of Christ in Judea and at Jerusalem, until he was betrayed, ch. x.-xxi. The most remarkable things in this section are,

1. The commission of the seventy disciples to preach the gospel, ch. x.

2. The parables of the prodigal son, the rich man and Lazarus, and the pharisee and publican, ch. xv. xvi.-xviii. 3. The conversion of the publican Zaccheus, ch. xix.

Sec. IV. Contains an account of the sufferings, death, resurrection, and ascension of Christ, ch. xxii.-xxiv. Besides the particulars of the Saviour's sufferings, which are related by the other evangelists, the things most remarkable in this section are,

1. The conversion of the dying malefactor on the cross, ch. xxiii.

2. The conversation of Christ, after his resurrection, with the two disciples on the road to Emmaus, ch. xxiv. 3. The manner of Christ's ascension, ch. xxiv.

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THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES.

The book of the Acts is a kind of history of the ministry and actions of the apostles, from which it derives its name. It forms a most desirable supplement to the four gospels, and a necessary introduction to the several Epistles. It commences with relating the ascension of Christ, and continues its records to the event of Paul's imprisonment at Rome, A. D. 65, including a period of more than thirty years. It shows the first planting of christianity, and the gathering of christian churches among both the Jews and Gentiles; the spread of the gospel in several parts of the world; the patience and courage of some of the apostles under the sufferings which they endured for the sake of it, and the marvellous success which attended them, all uniting to demonstrate the truth and divinity of christianity.

Luke does not give a universal or general account of the first christian churches, as he is silent concerning the labours of most of the apostles, and of the planting of christianity in most of the eastern nations, in

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