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AMONG the natural and strongly convincing proofs that an all-wise power, reigns in the material world, and directs the whole with an even hand, is the consideration that day and night, light and darkness, are dispensed to every part of the world ; taking the whole course of the year into account, the polar, the equatorial, and the middle regions, have equally the same space of time to enjoy the cheering light of the sun. The successive positions, in different res gions, are infinitely diversified, but their sum is the same. With such admirable wisdom is the whole contrived, that although the several divisions between light and darkness perpetually vary, and are never the same, at the same time, in different regions, yet in the cnd, the sum total is the same in all regions. What but perfection itself could contrive and execute such a plan, poising in equal scales the divisions of time, and dealing justly to all their equal portion of that most perfect element, etherial light? Does not this world thus wear, strongly enstamped upon its face, the Divinity ? That bright emblem of himself, being thus equally distributed, proclaims aloud his invisible hand! I say emblem of himself, for in his word he has chosen to characterize himself by this pure element, saying that he is a light which lighteneth every man that cometh into the world. A more apt resemblance of the divine nature than this, we find not among material things. As God, it pervades all peace, or at least so much of it as we are acquainted with; if not in full perfection, yet some degree of it is every where discernible. As the divine power, it is almost infinitely rapid in its motion: It is here and almost at an infinite distance at the same time. It is itself invisible, yet the medium by which all things else are seen, as God is that in which all things else exist. Light is the element which cheers the face of this lower world, as God gives life and spirit to all animated beings. It is the source of all beauty and splendour among material things, as. God is the fountain of glory to a universe of worlds. There being 80 many points of resemblance, by a figure best adapted to our apprehensions, he may well be called light; well may he be said to make his angels spirits, and his ministers a flaming fire. Seeing that light approaches so near to the pure etherial natures

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He slept, and in his sleep her weary The scriptures, rich in heavenly lore : guest she slew,

Who gives thee power their truths ť The workman's hammer in this hand explore, she took ;

And their great author to adore ! In that the fatal nail, then boldly struck;

Jehovah. Through both his temples drove the There wisdom, power and love divine, deadly wound,

In glorious effulgence shine, Transfix'd bis brain, and pinn'd him

n And make me wish that I were thine,

Andam to the ground.

Jehovah. Why stays my son, his absent mother

And who for me a child became, cries ; When shall I welcome his returning

Who too for me bore every blame,

That I might glow with purest flame! car, Loaded with spoils of conquering war?

Jehovah. Ab wretched mother, hide thine eyes; Who for lost sinners, death endur'd At Jael's feet a headless trunk he lies: That of their sins they might be curd, So Sisera fell, and God made wars to And for them endless life procur'd? cease,

Jehovah.
So rested Israel, and the land had peace. Exalted on thy throne on high,
[R. Cumberland. Look down with mercy's pitying eye,
Nor shut thy ears against my cry,

Jehovah.
JEHOVAH.

Forgive me, Lord, my errors past! WHO brought me into life at first,

Seal my sincere repentance fast;
Appeas'd my hunger, slak'd my thirst; Thy word and truth forever last,
And with a mother's fondness nurs'd ?

Jehovah.
Jehovah.

And should I ever cease to be
When in unheeding youth I stray'd, A lover of thy word and thee,
Nor of the shares of vice afraid, Who hast so kindly loved me,
Who was my teacher, guide, and aid ?

• Jehovah. Jehovah.

No; never more may I forbear Beset with dangers on each hand, To praise thy kindest love and care, Who scatter'd them by his command, And pour to thee my soul in prayer, And safe and fearless bade me stand ?:

Jehovah !
Jehovah.

When I am feeble, old and grey,
Who, to his promise ever true, May thy strong arm still prove my stay,
Display'd sweet virtue to my view? And soothe my aged pains away,
And help'd her precepts to pursue ?

Jehovah ? Jehovah. And when I hang my weary head, And next, in life's advancing days, And thou in sickness mak'st my bed, Who watch'd, and mark'd out all my Still on me sweet affection shed, ways,

Jehovah. And on my soul shed wisdom's rays ? O God! who liv'st above the skies,

Jehovah."

When Death's cold hand has clos'd
But, ah ! my erring heart! who still my eyes,
Would draw thee from the paths of ill, To thee, then, may my soul arise,
Who shews thee how to curb thy will?

Jehovah !
Jehovah.

[Orth. Ch. Maz.

THE reader is desired to correct the following error, that was inadvertent. ly made in the copy :- Page 301, third line from the top, for Charles Wesley read John Wesley.

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AMONG the natural and strongly convincing proofs that an all-wise power, reigns in the material world, and directs the whole with an even hand, is the consideration that day and night, light and darkness, are dispensed to every part of the world; taking the whole course of the year into account, the polar, the equatorial, and the middle regions, have equally the same space of time to enjoy the cheering light of the sun. The successive positions, in different regions, are infinitely diversified, but their sum is the same. With such admirable wisdom is the whole contrived, that although the several divisions between light and darkness perpetually vary, and are never the same, at the same time, in different regions, yet in the end, the sum total is the same in all regions. What but perfection itself could contrive and execute such a plan, poising in equal scales the divisions of time, and dealing justly to all their equal portion of that most perfect element, etherial light? Does not this world thus wear, strongly enstamped upon its face, the Divinity ? That bright emblem of himself, being thus equally distributed, proclaims aloud his invisible hand! I say emblem of himself, for in his word he has chosen to characterize himself by this pure element, saying that he is a light which lighteneth every man that cometh into the world. A more apt resemblance of the divine nature than this, we find not among material things. As God, it pervades all peace, or at least so much of it as we are acquainted with; if not in full perfection, yet some degree of it is every where discernible. As the divine power, it is almost infinitely rapid in its motion: It is here and almost at an infinite distance at the same time. It is itself invisible, yet the medium by which all things else are seen, as God is that in which all things else exist. Light is the element which cheers the face of this lower world, as God gives life and spirit to all animated beings. It is the source of all beauty and splendour among material things, as God is the fountain of glory to a universe of worlds. There being so many points of resemblance, by a figure best adapted to our apprehensions, he may well be called light; well may he be said to make his angels spirits, and his ministers a flaming fire. Seeing that light approaches so near to the pure etherial natures

Qa

wbich reason points out as the first cause of all things, it is not strange that the heathen, being unacquainted with the mind and will of God by revelation, should conclude that the sun, that great fountain of light, was God, or at least his throne, and the place of his immediate residence, and hence be led to pay their adorations to that luminary. Seeing him perform his daily and annual round in exact order; experiencing that he was the fountain and source of light and genial warmth ; that by his influence the earth budded and blossomed, and poured forth her fruits for sustenance and comfort, it was natural for them to conclude that the cause of so much beneficence must be the first cause of all; and therefore to him they bowed down and wor. shipped; with greatful hearts they hailed his rising beams that dispelled the darknes, and brought in the cheerful day.

This was, or rather it is (for it is still practiced in some parts of the world) a kind of idolatry much less culpable than many others, which ignorance and stupidity have sometimes taken up: for it has to plead in extenuation the powerful impression made by the object towards which it is directed; an object which the word of God di. rects us to consider as declaring his glory, and instructing us in his will : For the heavens declare his glory, and the firmament showeth his handy work. Dai unto day ultereth speech, and night unto night sheweih knowledge. There is no speech nor language where their voice is not heard. So long as the sun cometh forth out of his chamber as a bridegroom, and rejoiccth as a giant to run his course, all people and nations will understand his language, and the wise and prudent will receive instruction from his ways, and understand knowledge from his goings forth. Every day when that splendid luminary arises, gilding the horizon with light, and decking the whole face of nature with majesty and beauty, the pious Christain will elevate his mind to the great Author of light and life, by whom, and in whom, suns exist, and worlds move; and who every day rises upon his soul with the influences of his Holy Spirit, dispensing the spiritual life, and the light of his countenance : He will be excited to look by faith to the rising of that more glorious day, when the material sun shall no longer measure time, but there shall be one eternal splendour shining from the presence of God.

But at this season in the annual course of the sun, when day and night are dispensed to every part of the world in equal portions, we may usefully contemplate the subject in another point of view.Light is an apt emblem of prosperity and joy, as darkness is of calamity and woe: And these, by the wise direction of God, are about as equally dispensed to all men. Unequal they may frequently seem unto us; one may appear to enjoy far more than another; the day of prosperity to one may be long, and equally long the night of sor. row to another; but still take into the account the whole course of men's lives, with their different tempers and dispositions, and we have reason to think that the whole sum of their enjoyments and sufferings, their pleasures and pains, their actual good and evil, is nearly equal; what is lost, on either hand, at one period, is made up at another; the long night of sorrow in one part of life is compensated by as long a day of enjoyment in another. This scene of mortal

things is thus chequered and diversified with good and evil; as is the face of nature with light and darkness. God who reigns over all haruso ordained, and we cannot reverse the sentence of his will. It becomes us to receive the good with grateful hearts, as we rejoice in the light of the sun ;*and submit to the evil without murmuring and complaint. - Art thou then enjoying the sunshine of prosperity, forget not that a night of sorrow is coming ;'or art thou groping in the darkness of amiction, remember that though heaviness may endure for a night, yet joy shall come in the morning. Has thy day of pleasure been long, be not elated and over-confident, but consider that as long may be thy sorrois, before thou shalt have done with the present life. Onthe other hand, bast'thou endured long calamities, sink not in despair, Bert hope to the end, that the morning of joy will come, and the day continue as long; for such is the lot of man ; good and evil follow each other in censtant succession as day and night, now brightening our prospects, and now obscuring our souls in darkness and mournmg.

Thus is there no work nor device of the Almighty, in the natural world, but finds its counterpart in the moral, and may be instructive, if we will but attentively listen to its exhortations. .

- But the present commencing autumn and its accompaniments may be made to address the understanding in a language more intelligible and plain. To this end look abroad upon the earth! Behold the orchard and the forest bending under their loads, or the ground beneath strewed with abundance : See thy table replenished with delicious fruits, the apple, the peach, and the plumb; or the vats running over with wholsome beverage. Can you survey all this profusion with no higher sensations than what are experienced by the birds of the air, the ox, or senseless swine? Can you make of them no better use than merely to gratify your sensual appetite ? God certainly intended that such precious thing's brought forth by the sun, should call forth, in reasonable natures, reflections more consoDant to their excellence ; even admiration and wonder at his divine skill displayed in such productions, with love and praise for his goodness in furnishing so many innocent pleasures. Look again at the fields standing thick with corn of the latter crop, coming now to full perfection, and say, do they excite in you no reflections, but an avaricious desire of hoarding earthly treasures? Is this the only pleasure you. derive from beholding the bending ears? Is it mixed with no spark of gratitude to that kind being, by whose providential care the earth yieldeth her treasures ? Walking amidst the abundance that is poured around, will you vainly imagine that it procecds from your own arm, from your skill and industry; and has the agency of God no place in your thoughts? If so, reason and religion will cry shame on your stupidity and grossless : And well may we ask, wlierein are you superior to the diminutive animal of tlie forest, who koards his nuts, or smaller insect that crawls beneath your feet, groaning under the weight of a single grain of corn, mindful only of tire coming winter, and surveying only a few inches of ground?

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