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“ That, by an act of 8 Anne, for the en- came an inadequate protection, the praccouragement of learning, by vesting the tice of entering the books gradually lescopies of printed books in the authors or sened; and that the University of Cam- . purchaser of such copies during the time bridge, having lately contended that therein mentioned, it was enacted, copies of all books, whether registered or amongst other things, that if any person not at Stationers' Hall, should be delivered, should reprint any book without the con- commenced an action against a printer of sent of the proprietor, as iberein men- a recent publication for not delivering the tioned, the offender should forfeit such several copies thereof, upon which case it book, and also one penny for every sheet bas been determined that the said act of found in his custody'; but it was provided, queen Anne enjoins the delivery of copies that no one should be subject to such pe- of all works printed and published, whether nalty unless the title to the copy of such registered at Stationers" Hall or not; and book should be entered in the register that this determination will subjectthe petibook of the Company of Stationers; and tioners to great expence, and operate very it was farther provided and enacted, that seriously to discourage literature; and nine copies of each book, upon the best that the best paper copies, at the period paper, that should be printed and published of the passing of the said act, were not sias aforesaid, or reprinted and published milar to the expensive fine paper copies now with additions, should, by the printer printed, nor were any works of that costly thereof, be delivered to the warehouse description, which now issue from the keeper of the said Company of Stationers British press, at that time known, many of before such publication made, for the use those works are now printed by authors at of the royal library, the libraries of the their own expence, and many others upon Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, their sharing the profits after the deducthe libraries of the four Universities in tion of all expences; and the petitioners Scotland, the library of Sion College, in humbly submit that to enforce a delivery London, and the library belonging to the fa- of eleven copies of all books will, in the culty of advocates in Edinburgh; and that, cases in which, from the nature of the by an act of 41 Geo. 3, for the further en- works, and limited sale, a small number couragement of learning in the united king- only is printed, operate as a great disdom of Great Britain and Ireland, by se- couragement to the undertaking of such curing the copies and copyright of printed works; and that, by the said act of queen books to the authors of such books, or Ano e, the term of twenty-eight years' their assigns, for the time therein men- copyright is secured to the author, and his tioned, it was, amongst other things, en- assigns, in case he should be alive at the acted, that, in addition to the nine copies end of the first fourteen years, but, in case then required by law to be delivered to he should then be dead, the copyright the warehouse-keeper of the said Com- ceases at the end of the first fourteen pany of Stationers, and each and every years; and the petitioners humbly submit book which should be entered in the re- that this distinction is, in many cases, progular book of the said company, one other ductive of great hardships to the families copy should be in like manner delivered of authors, and is not founded upon just for the use of the library of the college of principles; and that the petitioners could the Holy Trinity in Dublin, and one other state innumerable instances of works lately copy for the library of the society of the published and now publishing, to prove King's Inn, Dublin, of every book that the heavy burthen which will be thrown should be thereafter printed and published, upon authors and publishers, by enforcing and entered in the said register book of the delivery of the copies required on best the said company; and that it was the paper; upon ten works published by one general persuasion of authors and book bookseller, the amount would be 5,698l.; sellers, that, by the said act of queen upon twelve works published by another Anne, copies of those books only were re- bookseller, the amount would be 2,9901.; quired to be delivered which the pro- and the petitioners need only add to this prietors chose to enter at Stationers' Hall statement some single works on best pato entitle themselves to the protection of per, viz. Daniel's Oriental Scenery 2,3101. ; the said forfeiture of one penny a sheet of Sibthorpe's Flora Greca 2,500l.; Brithe pirated copies, and therefore, when by tish Gallery of Engraving 1,0651.; Mr. the increased expences of publication, the Jolines's Froissart and Monstrelet Chrosaid forfeiture of one penny a sheet be nicles 1,1001.; Dibdin's Typography 4261. ; Lord Valentia's Travels 5771. ;

No. 2.- TREASURY MINUTE, 24th No. Costumes of the World 5321. ; Hodges's

vember 1812. Views in India 4021.; Salt's Views 300l. 6s. ; the new editions of Dugdale's Mo- The Chancellor of the Exchequer lays Nasticon will be 1,430 guineas ; the new before the Board, a letter addressed to him editions of Wood's Athenæ Oxonienses 770 by the marquisses of Buckingham and guineas, Daniel's Voyage to India 132l., Camden, dated 21st inst. in which they taken from an infinite number of works of state, “ that under the impressions which great expence lately published and now they entertain of the encreased sacrifices publishing, of the best copies of which, to which the country will in all probabisuch as required by the statute and the litý be called by the pressure upon its redetermination, frequently only fifty sources in a moment of unexampled excopies, and in some instances even a less pence and difficulty, they are anxious to number, are printed, prove to the House express, through bim, their desire and inthat the petitioners are not complaining tention of contributing their voluntary aid upon frivolous grounds; and praying, to the expences of the war; they therefore that leave may be given to bring in a request him, as the regular official channel Bill for granting relief to the petitioners.” of communication from the Exchequer to Ordered to lie upon the table.

this Board, to signify to us their intention

of paying, in aid of the general services of Tellers Of The ExchEQUER-LETTERS the year, and in quarterly payments, oneFROM THE MARQUISSES OF BUCKINGHAM AND

third of the net profits arising from the CAMDEN.] Mr. Wharton presented the fol- salary and fees of their respective tellerlowing Letters of the marquisses Bucking- ships of the Exchequer; and that they ham and Camden, addressed to the Chan- propose and intend to continue this vocellor of the Exchequer; relative to giving luntary contribution for and during the up a proportion of their net Incomes as present war; and to commence it from Tellers of ihe Exchequer : as well as all and after the present quarter ending the Proceedings of the Treasury thereupon.

5th January next.”

My lords read the 218th section of the No. 1.-The Marquisses BUCKINGHAM Act of the 43d of the King, cap. 122, di

and CAMDEN, to the Chancellor of recting the mode and receipt and applithe Exchequer.

cation of the voluntary contributions for

the purpose of carrying on the war. Exchequer, Nov. 21, 1812. My lords are pleased to direct, that Sir; under the impression which we letters be written to the marquis of Buck. entertain of the encreased sacrifices, to ingham and marquis Camden respectively, which the country will in all probability expressing to them the high sense which be called by the pressure upon its re- their lordships entertain of their public sources, in a moment of unexampled ex. spirited and patriotic intention of contripence and difficulty; we are anxious to buting one-third of the net profits of the express, through you, our desire and inten- salary and fees of their respective tellertion of contributing our voluntary aid to ships of the Exchequer, in aid of the gethe expences of the war: we therefore re- neral services of the year: and transmite quest you, as the regular official channel ing to them respectively copies of the of communication from the Exchequer to 2181h section of the said Act; and rethe Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, questing their lordships will be pleased to to signify to them, our intention of paying give directions that the said voluntary conin aid of the general services of the year, tributions may be paid into the Bank, and in quarterly payments, one-third of from time to time, conformably to the prothe net profits arising from the salary and visions of the said Act. fees of our respective tellerships of the Exchequer. We propose, and intend, to

No. 3.-Geo. HARRISON, Esq. to the continue this voluntary contribution for

Marquisses BUCKINGHAM and CAMand during the present war; and to commence it from and after the present quar. Treasury Chambers, Nov. 30, 1812. ter ending on the 5th of January next. My lords; the Chancellor of the Ex, We have the honour to be, &c.

chequer having laid before the Lords Com(Signed) NUGENT BUCKINGHAM, missioners of his Majesty's Treasury, your Camden.

lordship's letter of 21st inst. stating. " that

DEN.

under the impressions which your lord- ; tificates for the same, acknowledging the ships entertain of the encreased sacrifices payment of such voluntary contribution ; to which the country will, in all probabi- which sums to be paid as aforesaid, for lity, be called by the pressure upon its re- which such certificates shall be required, sources, in a moment of unexampled ex. shall be deemed and taken to be volunpence and difficulty, your lordships are tary contributions of such persons, body anxious to express, ihrough him, your de- politic or corporate respectively, towards sires and intention of contributing your effecting the purposes of this Act, and voluntary aid to the expences of the war, shall be applied as the other monies paid and therefore requesting him, as the re- into the Bank of England by virtue of this gular official channel of communication Act may be applied.” from the Exchequer to this Board, to sig. No. 4.- The Marquisses BUCKINGHAM nify to this Board your lordships intention and CAMDEN to George HARRISON, of paying, in aid of the general services Esq. of the year, and in quarterly payments, one third of the net profits arising from

Exchequer, Dec. 3d, 1812. the salary and fees of your respective tels the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury,

Sir; in consequence of the desire of lerships of the Exchequer, and that your signified to us in your letter of November Jordships propose and intend to continue 30th, we have this day given thenecessary this voluntary contribution for and during directions that the voluntary contribution the present war, and to commence it from of one-third of the net profits of our reand after the present quarter ending 5th spective tellerships of the Exchequer, shall of January next;” I have it in command, be paid by quarterly payments, from time from my lords, to express to your lord- to time as they shall accrue, from and ships, the high sense which they entertain after the present quarter ending on the 5th of your public spirited and patriotic in. of January 1813, to the governor and tention, of contributing one third of the net profits of the salary and fees of your cashier, in the manner directed by the

company of the Bank of England or their respective tellerships of the Exchequer, in 43d of the King, cap. 122.: which we reaid of the general services of the year; quest you to communicate to their lordand I am commanded by my lords, to ships. We have the honour to be, &c. transmit herewith, a copy of the 218th

NUCENT BUCKINGHAM. section of the Act of the 43d of the King,

CAMDEN. cap. 122, directing the mode of receipt and application of voluntary contributions

No. 5.-The Marquisses BUCKINGHAM

and CAMDEN to the CHANCELLOR for the purpose of carrying on the war ;

of the EXCHEQUER. and to request your lordships will be pleased to give directions, that your said Exchequer, December 11, 1812. voluntary contributions may be paid into Sir; as it is understood, from the disthe Bank of England from time to time, cussions that have taken place in the conformably to the provisions of the said House of Commons, on the subject of the Act. I am, my lords, &c.

public revenues, that the expences of the Geo. HARRISON, ensuing year will probably exceed those

of the present, we think it right, in expla. (Enclosure.)

nation of the letter which we had the ho. And whereas his Majesty's subjects, nour of addressing to you on the 21st Noresiding out of Great Britain, and others, vember last, to state to you, for the infor. may be desirous of voluntarily contribu- mation of the Lords Commissioners of the ting towards the purposes of this Act; be Treasury, that if in any year during the it further enacted, that it shall be lawful present war, the net profits of the several for any person or persons, body corpo. fees and salaries received in our offices in rate or politic, and at any time or times the Exchequer should exceed those of the during the continuance of this Act, to pay current year, it is our intention, in every or cause to be paid to the said governor such year, to pay as our voluntary contrior company, or to their cashier or cashiers, bution to the public, in addition to the or other person or persons to be authorised one-lbird of our profits as stated in ibat by them, any sum or soms of money, as letter, the whole of such excess beyond and for a voluntary contribution, for the the net receipts of the present year. We purpose of carrying on the war; and in have the honour to be, &c. such case, to require a certificate or cer.

Nugent BUCKINGHAM.
CAMDEN.

No. 6.-TREASURY MINUTE of 11th De to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, to in

form my lords, that if in any year during cember, 1812.

the present war the net profits of the seThe Chancellor of the Exchequer lays veral fees and salaries received in your before the Board, a letter, of this day's lordships' offices in the Exchequer, should date, which he has received from the mar- exceed those of the current year, it is quisses of Buckingham and Camden, as your lordships' intention in every such follows:

year to pay, as your voluntary contribu“ Sir; as it is understood, from the dis- tions to ihe public, in addition to the onecussions that have taken place in the third of your profits, as stated in the said House of Commons, on the subject of the letter of the 21st ult, the whole of such public revenue, that the expences of the excess beyond the net receipts of the preensuing year will probably exceed those sent year;" I have it in command from of the present, we think it right, in expla- my lords, to acknowledge the receipt of nation of the letter which we had the your lordships said letter, communicating honour of addressing to you on the 20th your intention still further to extend your of November last, to state, for the informa- public spirited and patriotic contribution tion of the Lords Commissioners of his to the expences of the war, and to request Majesty's Treasury, that if in any year that your lordships will be pleased to pure during the present war, the net profits of sue the same course with regard to this exthe several fees and salaries received in our cess as with respect to the original contrioffices in the Exchequer, should exceed | bution. I am, my lords, &c. those of the current year, it is our inten

GBO. HARRISON. tion, in every such year, to pay, as our voluntary contribution to the public, in addition to the one-third of our profits,

HOUSE OF LORDS. as stated in that letter, the whole of such

Thursday, December 17, excess beyond the net receipts of the

pre- The Bishop of Chester presented a Pesent year."

lition from the clergy and certain inhabiMy lords read their Minute of the 24th tants of Manchester and Salford, against November last, and the letter written to the Catholic Claims. His lordship stated, the marquisses of Buckingham and Cam- that the Petition was signed, in addition to den in pursuance thereof,

the clergy, by 1,000 respectable inbabiMy fords are pleased to direct, that tants and several dissenting ministers.letters be written to the marquisses Bu«kThe Duke of Montrose presented a Peingham and Camden, respectively, actition from the corporation and inhabitants knowledging the receipt of this communi- of Grantham, also against the Catholic cation, and of their intention still further Claims.-Ordered to lie on the table. to extend their public spirited and patriotic contribution to the expences of the INVASJON of Russia.] The Earl of war, and requesting that they will be Liverpool presented a Message from the pleased to pursue the same course with re- Prince Regent, expressing his royal highgard to this excess, as with respect to the ness's desire to render aid to the people of original contribution.

Russia, suffering in consequence of the in

vasion of France, and recommending to No.7.-GEORGE HARRISON, esq. to the the House to concur in that object. See Marquisses BUCKINGHAM and Cam. proceedings of the Commons).

His Royal Highness's Message was or Treasury Chambers, Dec. 15, 1812. dered to be taken into consideration toMy lords ; the Chancellor of the Ex- morrow. chequer having laid before the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treasury, INFORMATIONS Ex-officto.] Lord Hol. your lordships' letter of the 11th instant, land gave notice of his intention, at an stating," that as it is understood, from early period after the holidays, to present the discussions which have taken place in a Bill relative to Ex-Officio Informations. the House of Commons, on the subject of The noble lord stated, that he should not the public revenue, that the expences of have again pressed this subject had his the ensuing year will probably exceed former Bill been under the consideration those of the present year, your lordships of a large portion of the House ; but the think it right, in explanation to your letter fact was, it was brought forward at a late

DEN.

period of the session, when the attendance | matter of complete novelty. Though was thin, and therefore he proposed to some of his friends might have done so, ne renew the measure at an early opportunity confessed that he had not, as yet, formed after the recess.

his opinion on the subject, but said, that he should do so before to-morrow,

Earl Temple said, though he had not as HOUSE OF COMMONS.

yet decided, that, at present, the strong Thursday, December 17.

inclination of his mind was to support the PRINCE REGENT'S MESSAGE RESPECTING grant. The Invasion of Russia.] The Chan- Mr. Lockart spoke in support of the celtor of the Exchequer presented the fol- grant, and was hostile to the remarks of Jowing Message from his royal highness the hon. baronet. the Prince Regent:

The Message was then ordered to be “ George P. R.

referred to the Committee of Supply to“ The Prince Regent, acting in the morrow, name and on the behalf of his Majesty,

HOUSE OF LORDS. having taken into his serious consideration the accounts which he has received of the

Friday, December 18. severe distresses to which the inhabitants EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS. SLAVE of a part of the empire of Russia have Trade.) Lord Holland expressed a wish been exposed, in their persons and pro- to put qaestions to the noble earl opperty, in consequence of the unprovoked posite upon two subjects to which he had and atrocious invasion of that country by adverted in a former session. With rethe ruler of France, and of the exemplary spect to the African Slave Trade, six years and extraordinary magnanimity and forti- had now elapsed since the two Houses of tude with which they have submitted to Parliament had united in a wish that apthe greatest privations and sufferings in plications should be made to foreign the defence of their country, and the ar- powers to procure the abolition of that indent loyalty and unconquerable spirit human traffic. He lamented, however, they have displayed in its cause, whereby to observe, that the trade still continued results have been produced of the utmost to be carried on under the flags of our alimportance to the interests of this kingdom lies, Spain and Portugal, but he feared and to the general cause of Europe, re- with a large proportion of British capital. commends to the House of Commons to He was anxious to know what steps had enable his Royal Highness, in aid of the been taken, making use of the influence contributions which have been commenced which we must naturally have in the counwithin the Russian empire, for this purpose, cils of those allies, to procure the abolition to afford to the suffering subjects of his Ma of this disgraceful traffic, and whether, jesty's good and great ally the emperor of after the lapse of so long a period, any neRussia, such speedy and effectual relief gociation upon this point had at last been as may be suitable to this most interesting nearly brought to a termination ? He did occasion.

G. P. R." not mean to impute neglect to his Ma. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, when jesty's ministers, but it could not escape the Message was read, proposed that it notice, that the majority of the Prince Re. should be referred to the Committee of gent's council was now composed of those Sapply.

who were hostile to the abolition of this Mr. Whitbread said, that we ought to trade.-With respect to an Exchange of begin by relieving our own starving manu- Prisoners, he was also anxious to know facturers, as he saw no reason why, in this whether any steps had been taken subseinstance, charity should not begin at home. quent to the last negociation, with a view

Sir F. Burdete said, that this Message to the attainment of this object; and whewas not only extraordinary, but insulting ther if it was found not attainable conto the people of this country.

sistently with the honour and interests of Mr. Stephen differed much from the hon. the country, it was not intended by mibaronet, and thought the grant recom- nisters to institute an investigation into the mended in the Message advisable in the causes which had prevented the attainhighest degree.

ment of this object, so essential to the inMr. Ponsonby said, that the Message, terests of humanity? whatever might be its propriety, appeared The Earl of Liverpool stated, with reto him, or rather came upon him, as a gard to an exchange of prisoners, that

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