A Familiar Explanation of the Poetical Works of Milton. To which is Prefixed Mr. Addison's Criticism on Paradise Lost. With a Preface by the Rev. Mr. Dodd

Przednia okładka
J. and R. Tonson; and J. Newbery, 1762 - 144
 

Co mówią ludzie - Napisz recenzję

Nie znaleziono żadnych recenzji w standardowych lokalizacjach.

Inne wydania - Wyświetl wszystko

Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Popularne fragmenty

Strona 74 - For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell, Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Strona 127 - And another angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer; and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne.
Strona 16 - Milton's chief talent, and indeed his distinguishing excellence, lies in the sublimity of his thoughts. There are others of the moderns who rival him in every other part of poetry ; but in the greatness of his sentiments he triumphs over all the poets both modern and ancient, Homer only excepted. It is impossible for the imagination of man to distend itself with greater ideas, than those which he has laid together in his first, second, and sixth books.
Strona 74 - Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field; let us lodge in the villages. Let us get up early to the vineyards; let us see if the vine flourish, whether the tender grape appear, and the pomegranates bud forth: there will I give thee my loves.
Strona 24 - Milton, by the above-mentioned helps, and by the choice of the noblest words and phrases which our tongue would afford him, has carried our language to a greater height than any of the English poets have ever done before or after him, and made the sublimity of his style equal to that of his sentiments.
Strona 79 - At length into the limits of the north They came ; and Satan to his royal seat High on a hill, far blazing, as a mount Rais'd on a mount, with pyramids and towers From diamond quarries hewn, and rocks of gold ; The palace of great Lucifer...
Strona 28 - One great mark, by which you may discover a critic who has neither taste nor learning, is this, that he seldom ventures to praise any passage in an author •which has not been before received and applauded by the public, and that his criticism turns wholly upon little faults and errors.
Strona 91 - The author appears in a kind of composed and sedate majesty; and though the sentiments do not give so great an emotion as those in the former book, they abound with as magnificent ideas. The sixth book, like a troubled ocean, represents greatness in confusion; the seventh affects the imagination like the ocean in a calm, and fills the mind of the reader, without producing in it any thing like tumult or agitation.
Strona 71 - ... endearing things without descending from his natural dignity, and the woman receiving them without departing from the modesty of her character ; in a word, to adjust the prerogatives of wisdom and beauty, and make each appear to the other in its proper force and loveliness. This mutual subordination of the two sexes is wonderfully kept up in the whole poem...
Strona 70 - To whom thus Eve replied. O thou for whom And from whom I was form'd, flesh of thy flesh, And without whom am to no end, my guide And head! what thou hast said is just and right. For we to him indeed all praises owe And daily thanks; I chiefly, who enjoy So far the happier lot, enjoying thee Preeminent by so much odds, while thou Like consort to thyself canst no where find.

Informacje bibliograficzne