The works of the English poets. With prefaces, biographical and critical, by S. Johnson

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Strona 33 - Should God create another Eve, and I Another rib afford, yet loss of thee , 'Would never from my heart : no, no ! I feel The link of Nature draw me : flesh of flesh, Bone of my bone thou art, and from thy state Mine never shall be parted, bliss or woe.
Strona 113 - The haunt of seals, and ores, and sea-mews' clang: To teach thee that God attributes to place No sanctity, if none be thither brought By men who there frequent, or therein dwell. And now, what further shall ensue, behold.
Strona 75 - Thy suppliant, I beg, and clasp thy knees; bereave me not, Whereon I live, thy gentle looks, thy aid, Thy counsel, in this uttermost distress My only strength and stay; forlorn of thee, Whither shall I betake me, where subsist ? While yet we live, scarce one short hour perhaps, Between us two let there be peace...
Strona 185 - Things vulgar, and well weigh'd, scarce worth the praise ? They praise and they admire they know not what, And know not whom, but as one leads the other: And what delight to be by such extoll'd, To live upon their tongues and be their talk, Of whom to be dispraised were no small praise, His lot who dares be singularly good. Th' intelligent among them and the wise Are few, and glory scarce of few is raised.
Strona 4 - Nor skilled, nor studious, higher argument Remains ; sufficient of itself to raise That name, unless an age too late, or cold Climate, or years, damp my intended wing Depressed ; and much they may, if all be mine, Not hers who brings it nightly to my ear.
Strona 75 - My only strength and stay. Forlorn of thee, Whither shall I betake me, where subsist? While yet we live, scarce one short hour perhaps, Between us two let there be peace; both joining, As join'd in injuries, one enmity Against a foe by doom express assign'd us, That cruel serpent.
Strona 74 - ... a rib Crooked by nature, bent, as now appears, More to the part sinister, from me drawn ; Well if thrown out, as supernumerary To my just number found. O ! why did God, Creator wise, that peopled highest heaven With spirits masculine, create at last This novelty on earth, this fair defect Of nature, and not fill the world at once With men, as angels, without feminine ; Or find some other way to generate Mankind?
Strona 40 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Strona 73 - Thus Adam to himself lamented loud, Through the still night ; not now, as ere man fell, Wholesome, and cool, and mild, but with black air Accompanied, with damps and dreadful gloom, Which to his evil conscience represented All things with double terror; on the ground Outstretch'd he lay, on the cold ground, and oft Cursed his creation ; death as oft accused Of tardy execution, since denounced The day of his offence.
Strona 76 - Both have sinn'd, but thou Against God only, I against God and thee, And to the place of judgment will return, There with my cries importune Heaven, that all The sentence, from thy head removed, may light On me, sole cause to thee of all this woe,. Me, me only, just object of his ire!

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