Lady Chatterley's Lover

Przednia okładka
Lyric and sensual, D.H. Lawrence's last novel is one of the major works of fiction of the twentieth century. Filled with scenes of intimate beauty, explores the emotions of a lonely woman trapped in a sterile marriage and her growing love for the robust gamekeeper of her husband's estate. The most controversial of Lawrence's books, "Lady Chatterly's Lover" joyously affirms the author's vision of individual regeneration through sexual love. The book's power, complexity, and psychological intricacy make this a completely original work--a triumph of passion, an erotic celebration of life.

"Nobody concerned with the novel in our century can afford not to read it." -- Lawrence Durrell

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Note on the Penguin Lawrence Edition
vi
Chronology
vii
Introduction
xiii
Note on the Texts
xxxv
Advisory Editors Note
1
Lady Chatterleys Lover
3
A Propos of Lady Chatterleys Lover
303
Appendix
337
Explanatory Notes
349
Further Reading
362
Glossary of Dialect Forms
363
Prawa autorskie

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Informacje o autorze (1994)

David Herbert Lawrence (1885–1930) was born in the mining village of Eastwood, near Nottingham, England. His father was an uneducated miner; his mother, a former schoolteacher. Lawrence began his first novel, The White Peacock (1911), while attending Nottingham University. In 1912, he ran away with Frieda von Richthofen, the wife of one of his professors. They were married in 1914. Suffering from tuberculosis, Lawrence was in constant flight from his ill health, traveling through Europe and around the world by way of Australia and Mexico, settling for a while in Taos, New Mexico. Lawrence and Frieda returned to Europe in 1925. Among his more than forty volumes of fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, philosophy, and travel writing are Sons and Lovers (1913), The Rainbow (1915), Women in Love (1920), Studies in Classic American Literature (1923), The Plumed Serpent (1926), and Lady Chatterley’s Lover (1928).

Daphne Merkin is an essayist, novelist and literary critic. She is a contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine and Elle, and she writes for Slate, Book Forum, and many other publications.

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