Bentley's Miscellany, Tom 52

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Richard Bentley, 1862
 

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Strona 58 - Just at this moment the illustrious sun, breaking in all his splendor from behind a high bluff of the Highlands, did dart one of his most potent beams full upon the refulgent nose of the sounder of brass — the reflection of which shot straightway down hissing hot, into the water, and killed a mighty sturgeon that was sporting beside the vessel!
Strona 462 - J'ai une civilité fort exacte parmi les femmes, et je ne crois pas avoir jamais rien dit devant elles qui leur ait pu faire de la peine. Quand elles ont l'esprit bien fait,- j'aime mieux leur conversation que celle des hommes : on y trouve une certaine douceur qui ne se rencontre...
Strona 180 - ... he must obtain them at the expense of decency, friendship, and good feeling. It must always be probable, too, that a mere wit is a person of light and frivolous understanding. His business is not to discover relations of ideas that are useful, and have a real influence upon life, but to discover the more trifling relations which are only amusing ; he never looks at things with the naked eye of common sense...
Strona 263 - ... the hidden something, which he shall try in vain to arrest, but which, like a spirit, escapes him? If we ask what fire is,. of the men of science, they are at fault. They will tell us that it is a phenomenon, that their vocabularies can give no further account of it. They will explain to us that all that can be said of it is, that it is a last affection of matter, to the results of which (in the world of man) they can only testify, but of whose coming and of whose going — of the place from...
Strona 376 - ... many and by the dominant few. The affection felt for him by the civil service was singularly ardent and constant. Through all his disasters and perils his brethren stood by him with steadfast loyalty. The army, at the same time, loved him as armies have seldom loved any but the greatest chiefs who have led them to victory. Even in his disputes with distinguished military men he could always count on the support of the military profession.
Strona 182 - ... trial of minds becomes at last fatiguing, because it is unnatural and unsatisfactory. Every one of these brilliants goes there to shine; for conversational powers are so much the rage in London, that no reputation is higher than his who exhibits them.
Strona 462 - why do you blame the woman for the only sensible thing she could do — talking of her family and her affairs? For how should a woman who is as empty as a drum, talk upon any other subject?
Strona 376 - ... over a great indigenous population, he made himself beloved both by the subject many and by the dominant few. The affection felt for him by the civil service was singularly ardent and constant. Through all his disasters and perils, his brethren stood by him with steadfast loyalty. The army, at the same time, loved him as armies have seldom loved any but the greatest chiefs who have led them to victory.
Strona 179 - A witty man is a dramatic performer : in process of time, he can no more exist without applause, than he can exist without air ; if his audience be small, or if they are inattentive, or if a new wit defrauds him of any portion of his admiration, it is all over with him, — he sickens, and is extinguished.
Strona 182 - Yet, without all doubt, some of them were men of learning, wit, and ingenuity. As they are afraid of making free with one another, they should bring each his butt, or whetstone, along with him, for the entertainment of the company. My uncle says he never desires to meet with more than one wit at a time. One wit, like a knuckle of ham in soup, gives a zest and flavour to the dish ; but more than one serves only to spoil the pottage. And now...

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