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FABLE.

THE GOAT WITHOUT A BEARD.

'Tis certain that the modish passions
Descend among the crowd like fashions.
Excuse me, then, if pride, conceit
(The manners of the fair and great)
I give to monkeys, asses, dogs,
Fleas, owls, goats, butterflies, and hogs,
I say that these are proud : what then!
I never said they equal men.

A Goat (as vain as Goat can be)
Affected singularity:
Whene'er a thymy bank he found,
He roll’d upon the fragrant ground,
And then with fond attention stood,
Fix'd o'er his image in the flood.

“ I hate my frowzy beard,” he cries, “ My youth is lost in this disguise. Did not the females know my vigour, Well might they loath this reverend figure."

Resolv'd to smooth his shaggy face, He sought the barber of the place. A flippant monkey, spruce and smart, Hard by, profess'd the dapper art : His pole with pewter-basons hung, Black rotten teeth in order strung, Rang'd cups, that in the window stood, Lin’d with red rags to look like blood, Did well his threefold trade explain, Who shav'd, drew teeth, and breath'd a vein. Cease, cease, thou cruel Ocean,

And let my lover rest :
Ah! what's thy troubled motion

To that within my breast ?

“ The merchant, robb’d of pleasure,

Sees tempests in despair ;
But what's the loss of treasure,

To losing of my dear?
Should you some coast be laid on,

Where gold and diamonds grow,
You'd find a richer maiden,

But none that loves you so.

“ How can they say that Nature

Has nothing made in vain ;
Why then beneath the water

Should hideous rocks remain ?
No eyes the rocks discover,

That lurk beneath the deep,
To wreck the wandering lover,

And leave the maid to weep.”

All melancholy lying,

Thus wail'd she for her dear;
Repay'd each blast with sighing,

Each billow with a tear ;
When o'er the white wave stooping,

His floating corpse she spyd ;
Then, like a lily drooping,

She bow'd her head, and dy'da

FABLE.

THE GOAT WITHOUT A BEARD

'Tis certain that the modish passions
Descend among the crowd like fashions.
Excuse me, then, if pride, conceit
(The manners of the fair and great)
I give to monkeys, asses, dogs,
Fleas, owls, goats, butterflies, and hogs,
I say that these are proud : what then!
I never said they equal men.

A Goat (as vain as Goat can be)
Affected singularity:
Whene'er a thymy bank he found,
He rollid upon the fragrant ground,
And then with fond attention stood,
Fix'd o'er his image in the flood.

“ I hate my frowzy beard,” he cries, “ My youth is lost in this disguise. Did not the females know my vigour, Well might they loath this reverend figure."

Resolv'd to smooth his shaggy face, He sought the barber of the place. A flippant monkey, spruce and smart, Hard by, profess'd the dapper art : His pole with pewter-basons hung, Black rotten teeth in order strung, Rang'd cups, that in the window stood, Lin'd with red rags to look like blood, Did well his threefold trade explain, Who shav'd, drew teeth, and breath'd a vein.

The Goat he welcomes with an air,
And seats him in his wooden chair :
Mouth, nose, and cheek, the lather hides :
Light, smooth, and swift, the razor glides.

“ I hope your custom, sir,” says Pug. “ Sure never face was half so smug !”

The Goat, impatient for applause, Swift to the neighbouring hill withdraws. The shaggy people grinn'd and star'd. “ Heigh-day! what's here? without a beard ! Say, brother, whence the dire disgrace? What envious hand hath robb’d your face ?" When thus the fop, with smiles of scorn, « Are beards by civil nations worn ? Ev'n Muscovites have mow'd their chins. Shall we,

like formal Capuchins,
Stubborn in pride, retain the mode,
And bear about the hairy load ?
Whene'er we through the village stray,
Are we not mock'd along the way,
Insulted with loud shouts of scorn,
By boys our beards disgrac'd and torn ?

“ Were you no more with Goats to dwell,
Brother, I grant you reason well,”
Replies, a bearded chief. “ Beside,
If boys can mortify thy pride,
How wilt thou stand the ridicule
Of our whole flock? Affected fool!”

Coxcombs, distinguish'd from the rest, To all but coxcombs are a jest.

FABLE.

THE UNIVERSAL APPARITION.

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A Rake, by every passion ruld,
With every vice his youth had coold;
Disease his tainted blood assails;
His spirits droop, his vigour fails :
With secret ills at home he pines,
And, like infirm old age, declines.

As, twing'd with pain, he pensive sits,
And raves, and prays, and swears, by fits,
A ghastly Phantom, lean and wan,
Before him rose, and thus began:

My name, perhaps, hath reach'd your ear ;
Attend, and be advis'd by Care.
Nor love, nor honour, wealth, nor power,
Can give the heart a cheerful hour,
When health is lost. Be timely wise:
With health all taste of pleasure flies.”

Thus said, the Phantom disappears.
The wary counsel wak’d his fears.
He now from all excess abstains,
With physic purifies his veins ;
And, to procure a sober life,
Resolves to venture on a wife.

But now again the Sprite ascends,
Where'er he walks, his ear attends,
Insinuates that beauty 's frail,
That perseverance must prevail,
With jealousies his brain inflames,
And whispers all her lovers' names.
In other hours she represents
His household charge, his annual rents,

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