A Comparative Display of the Different Opinions of the Most Distnguished British Writers on the Subject of the French Revolution, Tom 3

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P. Stuart, 1811
 

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Strona 18 - No man should be accused, arrested, or held in confinement, except in cases determined by the law, and according to the forms which it has prescribed.
Strona 58 - They have seen the French rebel against a mild and lawful monarch, with more fury, outrage, and insult, than ever any people has been known to rise against the most illegal usurper, or the most sanguinary tyrant.
Strona 54 - When ancient opinions and rules of life are taken away, the loss cannot possibly be estimated. From that moment we have no compass to govern us ; nor can we know distinctly to what port we steer.
Strona 57 - France. France, by the perfidy of her leaders, has utterly disgraced the tone of lenient council in the cabinets of princes, and disarmed it of its most potent topics. She has sanctified the dark, suspicious maxims of tyrannous distrust, and taught kings to tremble at (what will hereafter be called) ¡ the delusive plausibilities of moral politicians.
Strona 61 - Difficulty is a severe instructor, set over us by the supreme ordinance of a parental guardian and legislator, who knows us better than we know ourselves, as he loves us better too. Pater ipse colendi hand fa,' cilem esse viam voluit. He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper.
Strona 66 - Where the great interests of mankind are concerned through a long succession of generations, that succession ought to be admitted into some share in the councils, which are so deeply to affect them. If justice requires this, the work itself requires the aid of more minds than one age can furnish.
Strona 63 - Your mob can do this as well at least as your assemblies. The shallowest understanding, the rudest hand, is more than equal to that task. Rage and frenzy will pull down more in half an hour, than prudence, deliberation, and foresight can build up in a hundred years.
Strona 55 - ... whilst governments were rather in their causes, than formed. Learning paid back what it received to nobility and to priesthood ; and paid it with usury, by enlarging their ideas, and by furnishing their minds. Happy if they had all continued to know their indissoluble union, and their proper place ! Happy if learning, not debauched by ambition, had been satisfied to continue the instructor, and not aspired to be the master...
Strona 61 - This it has been the glory of the great masters in all the arts to confront, and to overcome; and, when they had overcorne the first difficulty, to turn it into an instrument for new conquests over new difficulties ; thus to enable them to extend the empire of their science, and, even to push forward beyond the reach of their original thoughts, the landmarks of the human understanding itself.
Strona 60 - ... and bathing in tears and plunging in poverty and distress thousands of worthy men and worthy families. Their cruelty has not even been the base result of fear. It has been the effect of their sense of perfect safety, in authorizing treasons, robberies, rapes, assassinations, slaughters, and burnings, throughout their harassed land. But the cause of all was plain from the beginning.

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