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Principle of self-preservation or the view, that it is necessary to

the desire of continued exist- man in his actual situation 139

ence

112 Of this principle as it exists in

Of the two-fold action of the prin- the lower animals

140

ciple of self-preservation 113 The existence of the principle

Of curiosity or the desire of shown from the conduct of

knowledge

114

children and youth

141

Further illustrations of the prin- The same shown from the facts

ciple of curiosity

115 of later life

142

Of the two-fold operation and The social principle exists in the

the morality of the principle of

enemies of society

143

curiosity

116 Proofs of the natural desire of so-

Imitativeness or the propensity to ciety from the confessions and

imitation

117 conduct of those who have

Practical results of the principle been deprived of it

144

of imitation

118 Further proofs and illustrations of

Remarks on the subject of emu- the natural origin of the prin-

lation

119

ciple of sociality

145

Emulation resolvable into the Other illustrations of a similar

principle of imitativeness 120 kind

146

of the natural desire of esteem 121 Other instances in illustration of

Of the desire of esteem as a rule the same subject

147

of conduct

122 | The subject illustrated from ex-

Of the desire of possession 123 periments in prison discipline 148

Of the moral character of the pos-

Relation of the social principle

sessory principle

124 to civil society

149

Of perversions of the possessory

Of the form of desire denomina-

desire

125

150

Of the desire of power

126
Facts in proof of the natural de- CHAP. VI.-THE MALEVOLENT AF-

127

FECTIONS.

Of the moral character of the de-

sire of power

128 Of the comparative rank of the

Of the twofold action of the pro- affections

151

pensity to truth

130 Of the complex nature of the af-

Propensity of self-love or the de- fections

152

sire of happiness

131 Of resentment or anger

153

Of selfishness as distinguished Illustrations of instinctive resent-

from self-love

132

154

Modifications of selfishness; pride, Uses and moral character of in-

vanity, and arrogance

133 stinctive resentment

155

Reference to the opinions of phi- Of voluntary in distinction from

losophical writers

134 instinctive resentment

156

Tendency of anger to excess, and

Caap. V.--PROPENSITIES CONTINUED. the natural checks to it 157

SOCIALITY OR THE DESIRE OF SO- Other reasons for checking and

CIETY.

subduing the angry passions 158

Modifications of resentment.

The principle of sociality original Peevishness

159

in the human mind

135 Modifications of resentment. En-

The principle of sociality not sel-

vy

160

fish

136 Modifications of resentment.

Reference to the doctrine of

161

Hobbes on this subject 137 Modifications of resentment. Re-

Remarks on the statements of the venge

162

preceding section

138 Illustrations of the malevolent

The doctrine of an original prin- passions

163

ciple of sociality supported by Nature of the passion of fear 164

Jealousy

further shown from the Scrip-

CHAP. VII.-THE BENEVOLENT AF- tures

190

FECTIONS.

Further proofs that man
thus created

191

Of the nature of love or benevo- Relation of the principle of su-

lence in general

165

preme love to God to the other

Love, in its various forms, char- principles of the pathematic

acterized by a two-fold action 166 sensibilities

192

Of the parental affection. 167 Illustrations of the results of the

Illustrations of the strength of the principle of love to God from

parental affection

168 the character and life of the

of the filial affection

169 Savior

193

The filial affection original or im- The absence of this principle at-

planted

170 tended with an excessive and

Illustrations of the filial affection 171 sinful action of other princi-

Of the nature of the fraternal af- ples

194

fection

172 Further illustrations of the re-

On the utility of the domestic at- sults of the absence of this

fections

173 principle

195

Of the moral character of the do- Views of President Edwards on

mestic affections and of the be- the subject of human depravity 196

nevolent affections generally 174

Of the moral character of the CHAP. IX.-HABITS OF THE SENSI-

voluntary exercise of the be-

nevolent affections

175

Ot the connection between be- General remarks on the nature
nevolence and rectitude 176 of habit

197

Of humanity or the love of the Of habits in connection with the

human race

appetites

198

Further proofs in support of the Of habits in connection with the

doctrine of an innate humanity propensities

199

or love for the human race 178 Of habits in connection with the
Proofs of a humane or philan- affections

200
thropic principle from the exis- Of the origin of secondary ac-
tence of benevolent institutions 179 tive principles

201

Other remarks in proof of the Objection to these views in re-

same doctrine

180

spect to habit

202

Objection from the contests and Explanation of the above men-

wars among mankind

181

tioned cases

203

The objection,drawn from wars, Further illustrations of the fore-

further considered

182

going instances

204

Illustration of the statements of The objection to the extent of the

the foregoing section

133 law of habit further considered 205

Of patriotism or love of country 184 The objection noticed in connec-

Of the affection of friendship 185 tion with the malevolent affec-

Of the affection of pity or sym-

tions

206

pathy

186

of the moral character of pity 187

Of the affection of gratitude 188

THE SENSIBILITIES.

Chap. VIII.-THE BENEVOLENT AF-

PART SECOND.

FECTIONS. LOVE TO THE SUPREME

THE MORAL SENSIBILITIES

CONSCIENCE.

Man created originally with the

principle of love to God 189

That man was originally created

MORAL OR CONSCIENTIOUS Senti-

with a principle of love to God,

-RELATION OF REASONING

TO THE MORAL NATURE.

CLASS FIRST.

of approval and disapproval 225

EMOTIONS OF APPROVAL AND DISAP- Changes in the moral emotions

take place in accordance with

changes in the antecedent per-

CHAP. I.-PROOFS OF A MORAL NA-

ceptions

226

Of objects of moral approval and

Reference to the general divi-

disapproval

227

sion

207

Of the original ground or basis

Proof of a moral nature from con-

of moral approbation and dis-

sciousness

208 approbation

228

Evidence of a moral nature dis-

Emotions of moral approval are

coverable in what we notice in

called forth in connection with

children

the existence of right or recti-

Proofs of a moral nature from

tude in the things approved of 229

the manner of our intercourse
with our fellow-men

210

CHAP. III.-

Proofs of a moral nature from

the terms used in different lan-

guages

211

Of the doctrine which confounds

Proofs from the operation of the

reasoning and conscience 230

Of the close connection between

passions of anger and grati-

tude

212

conscience and reasoning 231

Proofs of a moral nature from

Illustration of the preceding sec-

feelings of remorse

213

tion

232

Evidence of a moral nature from

Further illustrations of the same

the ideas of merit and demerit,

subject

233

reward and punishment 214 Kemarks upon the case stated in

The existence of a moral nature the foregoing section

234

involved in systems of moral Of the training or education of

philosophy and in other wri- the conscience

235

tings and treatises of a inoral

Of guilt when a person acts con-

nature

215

scientiously

236

Proof from the uniformity of law 216 Mustrations of the statements of

Evidences of a moral nature

the preceding section from the

even among savage nations 217 case of the Apostle Paul 237

Further reinarks on the morality

of Savage tribes

218 Chap. IV.-NATURE OF MORAL BEAU-

The existence of civil or politi-

cal society implies a moral

nature

219 Of the origin of emotions of mor-

A moral nature implied in the

al beauty

238

motives of human conduct Of the origin and import of the

which are recognized in histori- phrase, moral deformity 239

cal works

220

Of the correspondence between

Evidence of a moral nature from

the degrees of moral beauty

Scripture

221 & the quickness or liveliness

Concluding remarks on the gen-

of the moral sensibilities 240

eral fact of a inoral nature 222 of the perception of moral beau-

ty considered as a source of

Cup. II.-EMOTIONS OF MORAL AP-

happiness

241

PROVAL AND DISAPPROVAL.

Of the moral beauty of the char-

acter of the Supreme Being 242

Classification of the moral sensi-
bilities

223 CHAP. V.-NATURE OF MORAL SUB-
Nature of the moral emotions

LIMITY.
of approval and disapproval 224

of the place or position, mental-

Remarks in explanation of the

ly considered, of the emotions moral sublime

243

TY.

Instances and illustrations of the those of mere approval and

moral sublime

244 disapproval

259

The moral sublime involves the Feelings of obligation have par-

morally beautiful

245 ticular reference to the future 260

A degree of moral sublime in acts Feelings of obligation subsequent

of strict and undeviating integ- in time to the moral emotions

rity or justice

246 of approval and disapproval 261

Other instances of the sublimity Feelings of obligation differ from

of justice

247 desires

262

Instances of friendship and the Further considerations on this

parental affection illustrative subject

263

of the subject

248

Of the moral sublimity of great

CHAP. IIJ.-UNIFORMITY OF ACTION

benevolent undertakings 249

IN THE MORAL SENSIBILITIES.

The spirit of forgiveness in some

cases sublime

250 Of uniformity in the decisions of

the moral nature and the prin-

THE SENSIBILITIES.

ciple on which it is regulated 264

The nature of conscience, con-

PART SECOND.

sidered as an uniform princi-

ple of action, requires that it

should vary in its decisions

THE MORAL SENSIBILITIES OR

with circumstances

265

CONSCIENCE.

Differences in the decisions of

conscience dependent, in part,

on differences of intellectual

power

266

Diversities in moral decisions de-

CLASS SECOND.

pendent on differences in the

amount of knowledge 267

FEELINGS OF MORAL OBLIGATION. Of diversities in moral judgment

in connection with differences

Chap. I.-EXISTENCE OF OBLIGATO- in civil & political institutions 268

RY FEELINGS.

Additional illustration of the

same view of the subject 269

Feelings of moral obligation dis- This view of the subject further

tinct from feelings of moral ap- illustrated from cases of assas-

proval and disapproval 251 sination

270

Proof of the existence of obliga- Reference to a cruel law of the

tory feelings from conscious-

Athenians

271

ness

252 Of diversities and obliquities of

Further proof from the conduct

moral judgment in connection

of men

253

with speculative opinions 272

Further proof from language and Further illustrations of the influ-
literature

254 ence of wrong speculative opin-

Further proof from the necessity ions

273

of these feelings

255 of the effect of wrong specula-

tive opinions among heathen

CHAP. II.-NATURE OF OBLIGATORY tribes

274

FEELINGS.

Influence of early associations on

moral judgments

275

Feelings of obligation simple and Ilustration of the principle of the

not susceptible of definition 256

preceding section

276

They are susceptible of different Of diversities of moral judgment

degrees

257

in connection with an excited

Of their authoritative and enforc-

state of the passions

277

ing nature

258 of the action of the conscience

Feelings of obligation differ from in connection with strong temp-

AL DISTINCTIONS.

tation

778 doctrine bears to the original

Of the existence of a moral na- and permanent charaeter of
ture in connection with public the Supreme Being

294

robbers and outlaws from so- Of the proofs of this doctrine

ciety

279 from the appeals which are

Illustration of the fact that there made in various parts of the

are the remains of conscien- Scriptures

295

tious feeling even in the most Remarks in conclusion of what

depraved of men

280 has been said on this subject 296

Of errors in the statements of

travellers

281 Chap. V.-MORAL EDUCATION.

Instances in proof of the preced-

ing view

282 Suggestions on the importance of

moral education

297

CHAP. IV.-

:-IMMUTABILITY OF MOR- The mind must be occupiod at

an early period either with

good or bad principles 298

Remarks on the reality of right Of the time when moral instruc-

and wrong,and on the standard tion and discipline ought to

of rectitude, which is involved commence

299

in their existence

283 Of the discouragements attending

Of the origin of the ideas or ab- a process of moral instruction 300

stract conceptions of right and Of the importance, in a moral

wrong

284 point of view, of adopting cor-

The immutability of moral dis-

rect speculative opinions 301

tinctions supported

by the Further remarks on

the same

views, which men take of things subject

202

in their nature or essence 285 Of the knowledge of the Supreme

Illustrations of the views of the Being, and of the study of reli-

preceding section

286

gious truth generally

303

Application of the foregoing of the application of the princi-
views to the doctrine of the im- ple of habit in morals

304
mutability of moral distinctions 287 Further views on the influence
The immutability of moral distinc- of moral habits

305

tions shown, secondly,from the Of the importance of correct mor-

terms and the structure of lan-

als in connection with our civ-

guages

288 il and political situation 306

The immutability of moral dis-

tinctions, thirdly, from the op-

eration of the passions of grat-

THE SENSIBILITIES OR SENSITIVE

NATURE.

itude and anger.

289

Shown, in the fourth place, by

SENSITIVE STATES OF THE

the character of the emotions,

which arise in view of actual

MIND OR SENTIMENTS.

instances of right and wrong 290

Shown, in the fifth place, from

PART THIRD.

the deportment and conduct of

individuals, and from the char-

IMPERFECT AND DISORDERED SENSI-

acter of codes of law and civil

institutions

291

The doctrine further shown from

CHAP. 1,-DISORDERED AND ALIENA-

the opinions, which mankind

TED ACTION OF THE APPETITES AND

entertain of the character and

PROPENSITIES.

government of God

292

Further remarks on the subject

Introductory remarks on disor-

of the last section

293

dered sensitive action

307

Further proof from a considera-

Of what is meant by a disorder-

tion of the relation, which the

ed and alicnated state of the

TIVE ACTION.

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