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similar to that of the Whale, and through this, the superfluous fluid is readily rejected.

Another and most beautiful instance of evidert design, may be adduced from the Beaked Chætodon, a species that frequents the shores and entrances of rivers in the exotic regions of the globe, and preys on such small insects as flutter near the surface. It is furnished, as the name implies, with an extension of the snout, resembling a beak. The general resort of the Chætodon, and the food on which it preys, furnishes a clue to the use of this extraordinary appendage. No sooner does the Jacalator, as it is termed by some writers, observe a fly resting on any plant that grows in shallow water, than it swims within five or six feet of the place, and darts from its beak a drop of water with such surprising dexterity, that it never fails of striking the insect into the sea.

The habits of aquatic natures also admit of variations that tally exactly with the purposes for which they are designed. Some, perpetually restless, and agitated as their native element, examine, and endeavour to penetrate, every chink along the beach in quest of food; others, in perfect tranquillity as to the means of obtaining it, remain nearly stationary in their usual haunts. A casual observer might be inclined to pity the fate of these, and to imagine that they would be without food; but no,--the Almighty

Creator of the Universe remembers the feeblest of his creatures, and amply provides for all their wants. Where shall we look for a more striking instance of this consolatory truth, than in the Angler, or Fishing Frog?

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This unsightly animal resembles the creature from which its name is derived when in a tadpole state. It grows to a large size, and occasionally inhabits the British coasts. A specimen taken in the sea near Scarborough was at least four or five feet in length, the head considerably larger than the body; round at the circumference, flat above; the mouth of a prodigious size, at least a yard in width, and

armed with sharp teeth. The upper part, of a dusky hue, in accordance with its places of resort ; for it delights to burrow in the sandy bed of ocean, or among the weeds.

Now mark the extraordinary manner in which this unobtrusive animal is enabled to procure

its prey, as it must be obvious that the peculiarity of its construction imperiously forbids the possibility of rapid movement. Two long, tough filaments are placed above the nose, each of them furnished with a thin appendage, closely resembling a fishing line when baited and flung out. The back is further provided with three others, united by a web, and forming the first dorsal fin. Pliny notices these extraordinary appendages, and explains their

“ The Fishing Frog,” says he, "puts forth the slender horns situated beneath his eyes, enticing by that means the little fish to play around, till they come within his reach, when he springs upon them. But it is not only the lesser inhabitants of the water that the Angler entices within his snares. Even the fierce and voracious Sword-fish often falls a prey to his artifices. For this reason, the fishermen regard the Angler with peculiar respect. They carefully release, and restore him to his usual haunts, when accidentally entangled in their nets."

Cicero also notices this extraordinary creature, in his admirable treatise on the nature of the Gods. He observed its wonderful construction when musing

use.

on the shores of Sicily, or when in the cool of evening he saw the little billows subside upon the shores of his own favourite Puteolan. It spoke to him, in accents audible to his reflecting mind; it told him that a creature so wonderfully organized could not be the work of chance.

Adieu.

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Listen to me, my friend, and I will endeavour to convince you, that equally clear evidences of mechanical contrivance are afforded by the means of defence assigned to different aquatic animals.

The Kispid Tetrodon, an oblong fish, inhabiting the seas of Carolina, is endowed with the extraordinary property of swelling its under surface into a large globe. The advantage of this is obvious. Such a sudden enlargement not only alarms the marine enemies of the Tetrodon, but prevents them from

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