The Virginia Report of 1799-1800, Touching the Alien and Sedition Laws: Together with the Virginia Resolutions of December 21, 1798, the Debate and Proceedings Thereon in the House of Delegates of Virginia, and Several Other Documents Illustrative of the Report and Resolutions

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A collection of important writings that had a profound effect on the debates that led to the Civil War. The Virginia Resolutions were written by James Madison [1751-1836] and adopted by the Virginia legislature in 1798, the Kentucky Resolutions were written by Thomas Jefferson [1743-1826] and adopted by the Kentucky legislature in 1798. Both opposed the Alien and Sedition Acts and initiated a debate about the respective powers of the federal government and states. This edition collects these three works, and adds the texts of the Alien and Sedition acts, comments from other states and relevant extracts from Madison's letters. [vii]-xvi, [17]-264 pp.

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Strona 162 - That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
Strona 190 - ... in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states, who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose, for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining, within their respective limits, the authorities, rights, and liberties appertaining to them.
Strona 21 - President, or to bring them, or either of them, into contempt or disrepute; or to excite against them, or either or any of them, the hatred of the good people of the United States...
Strona 148 - That this Assembly doth explicitly and peremptorily declare that it views the powers of the Federal Government as resulting from the compact to which the States are parties...
Strona 75 - That the freedom of the press is one of the great bulwarks of liberty, and can never be restrained but by despotic governments.
Strona 31 - The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year 1808, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person.
Strona 149 - That the General Assembly doth also express its deep regret that a spirit has in sundry instances, been manifested by the Federal Government, to enlarge its powers by forced constructions of the constitutional charter which defines them ; and that indications have appeared of a design to expound certain general phrases (which having been copied from the very limited grant of powers in the former articles of confederation were the less liable to be misconstrued), so as to destroy the meaning and effect...
Strona 228 - Constitution for those purposes : and that among other essential rights the liberty of Conscience and of the Press cannot be cancelled, abridged, restrained, or modified by any authority of the United States.

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