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and pursue whatever is well pleasing in bis sight. Then, and not till then, will the liberty of the unbound captive—the satisfaction of the cleansed leper—the joy of the reprieved criminal—the generous ecstasy of the reconciled child, be yours. Then, and not till then, will the spirit of the upper world make your heart its temple; and a share of the blessedness of the upper world be given you in foretaste of its perfect and endless enjoyment.

HYMN.

THE SINNER SAVED BY THE POWER OF DIVINE GRACE.

What shall the dying sinner do
That seeks relief from all his wo?
Where shall the guilty consience find
Ease for the torment of his mind?

How shall we get our crimes forgiven
Or form our natures fit for Heaven?
Can souls, all o'er defiled with sin,
Make their own powers and passions clean?

In vain we search, in vain we try,
"Till Jesus brings his Gospel nigh;
'T is there such power and glory dwell
As saves rebellious souls from hell.

This is the pillar of our hope
That bears our fainting spirits up;
We read the Grace, we trust the word,
And find salvation in the LORD.

Let men, or angels dig the mines,
Where nature's golden treasure shines;
Brought near the doctrine of the Cross,
All nature's gold appears but dross.

Should vile blasphemers with disdain
Pronounce the truths of Jesus vain,
I'll meet the scandal and the shame,
And sing and triumph in his name.

THE RT. REV. WM. WHITE, D.D.,

BISHOP OF THE DIOCESE OF PENNSYLVANIA.

This Right Reverend Prelate was consecrated in the Chapel of the Archiepiscopal Palace, at Lambeth, in England, on Sunday, the 4th of February, 1787, by the Most Rev. John MOORE, Lord Archbishop of Canterbury. The Most Rev. William MarkHAM, Lord Archbishop of York, the Right Rev. CHARLES Moss, Lord Bishop of Bath and Wells, and the Right Rev. John HINCHCLIFF, Lord Bishop of Peterborough, being present, and assisting--and is believed to have been longer in the Episcopate than any Prelate now living.

reasoning which had gone before; and especially, with what pro

VOL. II.)

(NO. V.

BISHOP OF THE DIOCESE OF PENNSYLVANIA.

the plain precepts which follow, as an inference from the deep

THE
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL PULPIT.
SERMON BY THE RT. REV. WILLIAM WHITE, D.D.

MAY, 1832.
OF THE CHRISTIAN SACRIFICE:

A Sermon
BY THE RT. REV. WM. WHITE, D. D.,
Rom. 12, 1.-"I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your

bodies a living sacrifice; holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service." In this epistle, as in others of St. Paul, there is drawn a perceptible line of difference, between the argumentative part of it and the practical. Of the latter, the text is the beginning: and considering the station which it occupies, we may compare a careful reader of the book, arrived at this place, to a traveller, who, having ascended an high mountain, by a road steep and beset with thorns, although not without a clue, looks down on the other side, along an easy descent, to a plain below.

The reason of noticing the transition, is because of the light thrown on the epistle generally, from the terms with which the text opens. There are some, who, by the double error of apply, ing to individuals what is said of the collective bodies of Jews and Gentiles, and of referring to a final state, what has an aspect to Christ's visible ķingdom in the present, have raised from this epistle a system accommodated to the favorite view of illustrating the sovereignty of God, without due regard to the no less essential perfection of his benevolence. Were it not, that the interpretation alluded to is here thought a mistaken one, there would be matter of wonder on what principle the inspired author laid down

II.13

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