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A DISCUSSION

THE BIBLE WINE QUESTION.

BY

LEON C. FIELD, A.M.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION

BY

BISHOP H. W. WARREN, D.D.

Vetustis novitatem dare, novis auctoritatem, obsoletis nitorem, obscuris lucem,

fastiditis gratiam, dubiis fidem.-PLINY, NAT. Hist. PRAEF.

NEW YORK:
PHILLIPS & HUNT.

CINCINNATI:
WALDEN & STOWE.

1883.

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

FROM THE HORS OF
GEORGE C. DEMPSEY

COPYRIGHT 1883, BY

PHILIJIPS & HUNT,

NEW YORK

The Heirs of
George C. Dempsey

PREFACE.

THE following work has already appeared, in large part, in

the pages of the “Methodist Quarterly Review” for 1882. The last section and the Appendix are entirely new matter. As the earlier portion of the book is printed from the stereotype plates of the “ Quarterly,” many changes and additions, which were deemed desirable, were thereby rendered impracticable. In order to supplement such deficiencies, as well as to answer certain criticisms, and bring the work up to the latest date, the Appendix has been prepared. It was not possible to refer to this on the several pages to which its topics relate, but the pages are themselves indicated in the respective appendixes.

In the preparation of this work I have aimed especially at fullness and accuracy. It has been my endeavor to make it an authority on which students of the Bible wine question might rely. In almost every instance I have gone to original sources of information, and in the few cases where these were inaccessible I have given the best attainable authority on the subject. I have purposed to write nothing which could not be verified, and I have been careful to place the means of verification in the reader's hand. That I have made no mistakes and fallen into no inaccuracies is more than I dare hope ; but I have conscientiously and industriously labored to avoid them. I have striven, in the words of Pliny, vetustis novitatem dare, novis auctoritatem, obsoletis nitorem, obscuris lucem, fastiditis gratiam, dubiis fidem, “to give freshness to what is old, authority to what is new, brightness to what has become tarnished, light to what is obscure, acceptability to what is slighted, and credibility to what is doubtful,” which Pliny truthfully describes as res ardua, “no easy task.”

The list of authorities which I have consulted is sufficiently indicated in the foot-notes, although many that I have had at hand find no mention there. This is especially true of works

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