Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers: First Series Volume I - the Confessions and Letters of St. Augustine

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Philip Schaff
Cosimo, Inc., 1 maj 2007 - 636
"The Council of Nicaea in 325 AD marked the beginning of a new era in Christianity. For the first time, doctrines were organized into a single creed. The Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers did most of their writing during and after this important event in Church history. Unlike the previous era of Christian writing, the Nicene and Post-Nicene era is dominated by a few very important and prolific writers. In Volume I of the 14-volume collected writings of the Nicenes and Post-Nicenes (first published between 1886 and 1889), readers will discover some of the writings of Saint Augustine, recognized as a great religious figure by many Christian sects. He is the patron of the Augustinian monks, who live their lives according to the values found in Augustines writings. In the Confessions, Augustine speaks honestly about his sins as a youth and the saving grace he discovered when he found God. In the Letters, the true personality of Augustine shines through. He is one of the major theological resources of his time, and so through his correspondences, audiences can see what issues plagued the newly unified Christian religion and come to know the man who helped shape Western religion as we know it."
 

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The Confessions
45
He delighted in Latin studies and the empty fables of the poets but hated tie elements
51
Chapter VIITroubled by restlessness and grief he leases his country a second time for Carthage
71
HE DESCRIBES THE TWENTYNINTH YEAR OF HIS AGE IN WHICH HAYING DISCOVERED THE FALLA
79
Chapter XWhen he had left the Maniehseans he retained Ms depraved opinions concerning God sin
85
Chapter IILAs Ambrose was occupied with business and study Augustiit could seldom consult Mm
91
Chapter XIBeing troubled by his grievous errors he meditates entering on a new life
98
That God is not corruptible who if He were would not be God at ail
104
J ETTSK MB 1 TO HlRMOGlHIANUS
219
TO ZSNOBIWS
220
TO NB8RIDIUS
222
VNbbbidius to Augustus
223
VIITo NrBMBIOS
224
NSBWDIPS TO AUGUSTIK
226
To NBBBJBOTS
227
To Nbbrimto
228

Whatever is owes its being to God m
111
HE FINALLY DESCRIBES THE THIRTYSECOND YEAR OF HIS AGE THE MOST MEMORABLE OF
116
Chatter VIIHe deplores his wretchedness that having been born thirtytwo years he had not yet found
123
HE SPEAKS OF HIS DESIGN OF FORSAKING THE PROFESSION OF RHETORIC OF THE DEATH OF
129
Of the conversion of Evodius and the death of his mother when returning with him
135
HAVING MANIFESTED WHAT MB WAS AND WHAT HE IS KB SHOWS THE GREAT FROST OF HIS COKFESSIONj AMD BSIN6 ABOUT T...
142
That in his Confessions he may do good he considers others
143
The love of God in His nature superior to all creatures is acquired by the knowledge of the senses and the exercise of reason
144
That God is to be found neither from the powers of the body nor of the soul
145
Not only all things but also literature and images are taken from the memory and are brought forth by the act of remembering
146
Chapter XLWhat it is to learn and to think
147
In memory there are also images of things which are absent
148
God cannot be attained unto by the power of memory which beasts and birds possess
149
What it is to remember IS0 Chapter XX We should not seek for God and the happy life unless we had known it ISO Chapter XXI How a happy life ...
150
A happy life is to rejoice in God and for God
151
He who finds truth finds God S2 Chapter XXVHe is glad that God dwells in his memory
152
On the misery of human life S3 Chapter XXIX AI1 hope is in the mercy of God
153
About to speak of the temptations of the lust of the flesh he first complains of the lust of eating and drinking
154
Of the charms of perfumes which are more easily overcome 1 j6 Chapter XXXIII He overcame the pleasure of the ear although in the church he freq...
156
Another kind of temptation is curiosity which is stimulated by the lust of the eyes
157
A third kind is pride which is pleasing to man not to God
158
He is forcibly goaded on by the love of praise 59
160
The only safe restingplace for the soul is to be found fa God
161
TOT DESIGN OF HIS CONFESSIONS BEING DECLARED HE SEEKS FROM GOD THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE HOLY SCRIPTURES AND BE...
163
Chapter IIIHe begins from the creation of the worldnot understanding the Hebrew text
164
Heaven and earth cry out that they have been created by God
165
Chapter VIJ By His coeternal Word He speaks and ail things are done
166
The rashness of those who inquire what God did before He created heaven and earth
167
Before the time created by God times were not l6j Chapter XIV Neither time past nor future but the present only really is t68 Chapter XV There is onl...
169
We are ignorant in what manner God teaches future things
170
That time is a certain extension 7
171
He calls on God to enlighten his mind
172
Times are measured in proportion as they pass by
173
That human life is a distraction but that through the mercy of God he was intent on the prize of his heavenly calling
174
HI CONTINUIS HIS EXPLANATION OF THE FIRST CHAPTER OF GENESIS ACCORDING TO THE SEFTOAOTNT AND BY ITS ASSISTANC...
176
What may have been the form of matter
177
Heaven and earth werl made in the beginning j afterwards the world daring six days from shapeless matter
178
From the formless earth God created another heaven and a visible and formed earth
179
Of the depth of the Sacred Scripture and its enemies
180
He wishes to have no intercourse with those who deny Divine Truth
181
He mentions five explanations of the words of Genesis i r
182
What error is harmless in Sacred Scripture i8st Chapter XIX He enumerates the things concerning which all agree
183
He discusses whether matter was from eternity or was made by God
184
Two kinds of disagreements in the books to be explained
185
What he might have asked of God had he been enjoined to write the book of Genesis
186
The words In the beginning and The heaven and the earth are differently understood
187
Chapter XXXIn the great diversity of opinions it becomes all to unite charity and Divine Truth
188
THE GOODNESS OF GOD EXPLAINED IN THE CREATION OF THINGS AND OF THE TRINITY AS FOUND IK THE FIRST WORDS OP GEN...
190
AH creatures subsist from the plenitude of divine goodness 19a Chapter IIIGenesis i 3Of Light he understands as it is seen in the spiritual creatures
191
Chapter VIIThat the Holy Spirit brings to us God
192
Chapter XThat nothing arose save by the gift of God
193
Allegorical explanation ol Genesis chap concerning the origin o the Church and its worship
194
That out of the children of the night and of the darkness children of the light and of the day are made
195
That no one bat the Unchangeable Light knows himself
196
Chapter XVHI Of the lights and stars of heavenof day and night ver 14
197
All men should become lights in the firmament of heaven
198
Concerning reptiles and flying creatures ver 20the sacrament of Baptism being regarded
199
He explains the divine image ver 26 of the renewal of the mind zoo Chapter XXIII That to have power over all things ver 26 is to jodge spiritually of...
201
Why God has blessed men fishes flying creatures and not herbs and the other animals ver 28
202
He explains the fruits of the earth ver 29 of works of mercy
203
Many are ignorant as to this and ask for miracles which are signified under the names of fishesand whales
204
Chapter XXIXAlthough it is said eight times that God saw that it was good yet time has no relation to God and His Word 25
205
The world was created by God out of nothing
206
He prays God for that peace of rest which hath no evening
207
XIIITo Nebmdiws
230
To NlBRtBIWS
231
To ROMANIAHUS
232
Maximus to Augbstih
233
To Maximus
234
To CCELBSTMWS
235
To Gaius
236
To Bishop Valerius
237
To Bishop Aurelios
239
To Maximik
242
To LlCENTIUS
246
To Paotbtos
248
XXVHLTo Jerome
251
To Awpius
253
To Pavlinus ami? Therasia
258
To PROCUUBANUS
260
To Eusraius
262
To EUSEBIUS
263
To Casulanot
265
XXXVIITo Simpmciahos
270
To Profuturus
271
Jerome to Augtotih
272
XL To Aurwjus
275
To Glorios Euwsius etc
276
XLIVTo Ehwshm Glorius and tub two Felixes
285
To Pobmcola
292
XLVIILTo Ewdoxiws
294
To the Magistrates of Sotfbctum
295
To Crismnos
296
till To GsHuosm
298
To Jakoarius
300
To Januarius
303
To Pammachibs ig LIX To VlCTOWHOS m
317
To SlWERtW
319
LXV1To Cmsmnus
323
LXVILTo Jsrome
324
To Castoeiits
329
To Pmsidiws
333
To THE DOMATISTS
343
LXXVIITo Felix and HrtAEiKUS
344
LXXVIILTo the Clergy itc or the Church of Hippo
345
A Challenge to a Manicksam Teacher
349
To Alyhus
364
To Emeritus
365
LXXXVOLTo Januamus 6g LXXXIX To Festus
373
TO the Lady Italica
380
TO VlNCEKTIVS
401
T0 Olympius
404
XCVILTo Olympius
405
To Boniface
406
To THE VERY DEVOVF ITALICA 4l0 C TO DoNATUS
412
CIILTo my Lord and Brother Avcvsum
425
To Nectarius AXJ CXITo VlCTORIANUS
433
TO FORTOWATUS
436
CXVLTo Giwerosus
437
AOGSISTIN TO DlOSCORVS
438
From Jerome to Atchstim
451
CXXVITo Albjha
459
To Lady Proba
469
CXXXIILTo Marcellinus
470
To Bishop Augustin
472
CLXXXVin To Juliana
552
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