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crystals of acetate of bismuth will gradually precipitate. See Bismuth.

SUCCINATE OF BISMUTH.

Experiment 1. If succinic acid in solution be saturated with bismuth, the result will be succinate of bismuth, which crystallizes in yellow plates, soluble in water.

BENZOATE OF BISMUTH.

Experiment 1. When benzoic acid is combined with oxyd of bismuth, benzoate of bismuth is formed, which crystallizes in needles.

OXALATE OF BISMUTH.

Experiment 1. Oxalate of potash added to nitrate of bismuth, affords a white precipitate of oxalate of bismuth.

Remark. The other salts of bismuth, viz. the tartrate, arseniate and molybdate, which are not much known, are formed by saturating the different acids with this base. The following properties are possessed by the greater part of the salts of this metal:

1. Water generally decomposes them, affording a white powder or sub-salt;

2. Prussiate of potash occasions a white precipitate;

3. Hydro-sulphuret of potash produces a black precipitate ; and,

4. Tincture of galls gives an orange coloured precipitate.

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SECTION XVI.

SALTS OF ANTIMOMY.

NITRATE OF ANTIMONY.

Experiment 1. When antimony is added to nitric acid, it is converted into a white oxyd, a portion of which dissolves in the remaining acid, and forms nitrate of antimony.

MURIATE OF ANTIMONY. Experiment 1. When antimony is added to muriatic acid, and heat applied, a portion is dissolved, forming muriate of antimony. Or,

Experiment 2. If antimony be dissolved in nitromuriatic acid, the solution will be of a yellow colour, and contain besides muriate, the oxy-muriate, of antimony, called also butter of antimony ; or,

Experiment 3. If one part of antimony be triturated with two parts of oxy-muriate of mercury, and the mixture distilled, oxy-muriate of antimony will pass over in the state of a thick fatty mass of a grayish white, and often crystallizes in four sided prisms. And,

Experiment 4. If water be added to this salt, submuriate of antimony or algorath's powder will be precipitated. See Antimony.

SULPHATE OF ANTIMONY.

Experiment 1. When antimony is digested in sulphuric acid at a boiling heat, it will be converted into a white mass containing sulphate of antimony.

SULPHITE OF ANTIMONY. Experiment 1. If to a solution of antimony in muriatic acid, sulphurous acid be added, sulphite of antimony will precipitate.

PHOSPHATE OF ANTIMONY.

Experiment 1. When oxyd of antimony is added to liquid phosphoric acid, the result is phosphate of antimony, which is soluble in water, but not crystallizable.

Experiment 2. When phosphate of lime, or as the colleges direct, the shavings of hartshorn and crude antimony are exposed to a strong heat in a crucible, there results a triple compound called phosphate of lime and antimony, or James' powder. See Antimony.

ACETATE OF ANTIMONY.

Experiment 1. If oxyd of antimony be digested in acetic acid a solution will take place, and form acetate of antimony, which, on evaporation, will crystallize.

OXALATE OF ANTIMONY.

Experiment 1. When oxy-muriate of antimony is added to oxalate of potash, oxalate of antimony will gradually precipitate.

TARTRATE OF ANTIMONY.

Experiment 1. When oxyd of antimony is dissolved in tartaric acid, a gelatinous substance will be formed called tartrate of antimony.

ARSENIATE OF ANTIMONY.

Experiment 1.. When arseniate of potash is added to muriate of antimony, a white precipitate will be obtained, which is arseniate of antimony.

TARTRATE OF POTASH AND ANTIMONY.

Experiment 1. If equal parts of per oxyd of anti

mony and super-tartrate of potash be boiled in a sufficient quantity of water, a triple combination will be formed, which when filtered and evaporated form tartrate of potash and antimony,or tartar emetic. Or,

Experiment 2. If crocus of antimony, or otherwise sulphuretted oxyd of antimony, be digested in the same manner in water holding super-tartrate of potash in solution, the same product will be obtained.

Remark. This salt forms regular crystals in tetrahedrons, which effloresces when exposed to the air. It is procured in the shops in the form of powder, as a more convenient mode of administering it. It is composed of 35.4 tartaric acid, 39.6 per oxyd of antimony, 16.7 potash, and 8.3 water. See Antimony:

The salts of antimony have the following general properties :

1. They generally precipitate, or decompose by the addition of water;

2. Prussiate of potash throws down a white precipitate;

3. Tincture of galls has the same effect; and,

4. Hydro-sulphuret of potash gives an orange coloured precipitate.

SECTION XVII. .

SALTS OF TELLURIUM.

NITRATE OF TELLURIUM.

Experiment 1. If nitric acid he digested on tellurium, the metal will be dissolved, and form nitrate of tellurium.

Remark. This solution of tellurium is colourless, and yields, on evaporation, small needle-form crystals.

MURIATE OF TELLURIUM

Experiment 1. When tellurium is dissolved in nitro-muriatic acid, the muriate of tellurium is formed.

Experiment 2. If water be added to this solution, a white precipitate will be obtained, which, on the addition of more water, is re-dissolved.

SULPHATE OF TELLURIUM.

Experiment 1. Sulphuric acid acts on tellurium, and forms with it sulphate of tellurium. See Tellurium.

Remark. The salts of tellurium have the following properties :

1. The fixed alkalies throw down from their solu. tion, a white powder, which is re-dissolved by an excess of alkali;

2. Prussiate of potash occasions no precipitate;

3. Hydro-sulphuret of potash throws down a brown or blackish precipitate; and,

4. Tincture of galls produces a flaky yellow precipitate,

SECTION XVIII.

SALTS OF ARSENIC.

NITRATE OF ARSENIC.

Experiment 1. When arsenic is added to nitric acid, a violent effervescence is produced, and nitrate of arse. nic is formed. See Arsenic.

MURIATE OF ARSENIC.

Experiment 1. If muriatic acid be digested on arsenic, with the assistance of heat, muriate of arsenic will be produced. Or,

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