The Works of Edmund Burke, Tom 4

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C. C. Little & J. Brown, 1839

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Strona 394 - Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in. They give their whole form and color to our lives. According to their quality, they aid morals, they supply them, or they totally destroy them.
Strona 313 - The storm has gone over me ; and I lie like one of those old oaks which the late hurricane has scattered about me. I am stripped of all my honors ; I am torn up by the roots, and lie prostrate on the earth ! There, and prostrate there, I most unfeignedly recognize the divine justice, and in some degree submit to it.
Strona 315 - As long as our sovereign lord the king, and his faithful subjects, the lords and commons of this realm — the triple cord which no man can break...
Strona 313 - ... would have wanted all plausibility in his attack upon that provision which belonged more to mine than to me. He would soon have supplied every deficiency, and symmetrized every disproportion. It would not have been for that successor to resort to any stagnant wasting reservoir of merit in me, or in any ancestry He had in himself a salient, living spring, of generous and manly action.
Strona 418 - What I say, I must say at once. Whatever I write is in its nature testamentary. It may have the weakness but it has the sincerity of a dying declaration. For the few days I have to linger here, I am removed completely from the busy scene of the world ; but I hold myself to be still responsible for every thing that I have done whilst I continued on the place of action.
Strona 292 - I do not mean to speak disrespectfully of Lord North. He was a man of admirable parts; of general knowledge ; of a versatile understanding fitted for every sort of business ; of infinite wit and pleasantry ; of a delightful temper ; and with a mind most perfectly disinterested. But it would be only to degrade myself by a weak adulation, and not to honour the memory of a great man, to deny that he wanted something of the vigilance and spirit of command, that the time required.
Strona 271 - And, having looked to Government for bread, on the very first scarcity they will turn and bite the hand that fed them.
Strona 314 - The crowa has considered me after long service : the crown has paid the duke of Bedford by advance. He has had a long credit for any service which he may perform hereafter. He is secure, and long may he be secure, in his advance, whether he performs any services or not.
Strona 400 - ... customs, manners, and habits of life. They have more than the force of treaties in themselves. They are obligations written in the heart. They approximate men to men, without their knowledge, and sometimes against their intentions. The secret, unseen, but irrefragable bond of habitual intercourse holds them together, even when their perverse and litigious nature sets them to equivocate, scuffle, and fight, about the terms of their written obligations.
Strona 309 - ... are the most exposed to jealousy, avarice, and envy. The merit of the original grantee of his Grace's pensions was in giving his hand to the work, and partaking the spoil, with a prince who plundered a part of the national Church of his time and country. Mine was in defending the whole of the national Church of my own time and my own country, * See the history of the melancholy catastrophe of the Duke of Buckingham. Temp. Hen. VIII. and the whole of the national Churches of all countries...

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