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perial family, lost, in the course of last year, four of frankly confess I could have wished it to have been
its members; and the Emperor two uncles, one somewhat less plainly exhibited. As his supine-
sister (the ex-Empress of France), and one cousin, ness began to weary me, I called Madame de Com-
Finally, there are included in this list of deceased, minges to my side, that she might endeavor to make
one French Prince, the Duke of Guise, son of the him talk, in which she fortunately succeeded. When
Duke d'Aumale, a month old: Prince Ernest of the Queen rose, I approached the King of England,
Saxony, son of Prince John, aged 16; the Duke and, in order to make him talk, I inquired for some
Adam of Wurtemberg, brother of the Queen, aged persons whom I had seen in his suite, but he an-
55; and Princess Charlotte of Wurtemberg, wife of swered my questions without the slightest gallantry.
the Duke Paul (brother of the King Regnant and When the hour for his departure arrived, we got into
sister of the Duke of Saxe-Altenburg), aged 60; to our carriages, and bore him company to the middle
whom must be added Madame Adelaide of Orleans, of the forest, where every one alighted, as they had
his widow, the Duchess of Parma, viz., Jerome the main, saying, “I believe my Lord Germain, who

"In the family of the Bonapartes, three died besides and thus approached me, accompanied by Lord Ger-
aged 42; the eldest daughter of his brother Lucien, my sentiments and intention; I am your very obe-
eldest son of his brother Jerome, Count de Montfort, speaks better French than I do, has explained to you
Donna Christinna Egypta, afterwards Lady Dudley dient servant." I answered that I was equally his
Stuart, aged 49; the eldest son of his sister Caroline, obedient servant. Germain paid me a great many
Louis Napoleon Achille Murat, formerly Duke of compliments; after they were over the King bowed

* The births were 13 in number, including eight | Miss Pardoe's Louis XIV.
Duke of Russia, the Archduke Albert of Austria, OF STUART..The royal line of the Stuarts is among
the Duke d'Aumale of France (since dead), the the most unfortunate in the records of history
Neapolitan Prince Count Louis d' Aquila, the Duke Their destiny followed them during the long period
Max of Leuchtenberg, and the Count Henry II. of of four hundred years. Robert III., king of Scot-
Reuss-Kosteritz; and five princesses, daughters of land, died of a broken heart, occasioned by his el-
the Emperor of Brazil, the Crown Prince of Sardi- dest son, Robert, having been starved to death
nia, the Hereditary Prince of Lucca (now Parma), and his youngest son, James I., was taken prisoner
the Duke Max of Bavaria, and the Prince Christian by the English, and remained in confinement eigh-
Infante John Charles of Spain (son of Don Carlos), by his own relatives as a punishment. James II.

The number of marriages was four, viz., that of the beheaded three of his kindred, he was assassinated
to Mary of Modena; that of the Infante Henry of was killed by a cannon-shot at the siege of ROX-
Spain (son of Infante Don Francisco de Paula), to burgh. James Ill, succeeded his father, James II.
Dona Elena of Castella y Skelly Fernanda de Cor-He put to death his brother John, and would have
dova; that of the Infanta Louisa. Theresa of Spain | destroyed his brother Alexander, but he escaped,
de Moscow y Carbajal, Count of Trastamara, battle, and having fallen from his horse, took refuge
(daughter of Don Francisco), to Don Jose Osorio and levied war against him. James was defeated in
Duke of Sessa; and that of Prince Ferdinand of in a mill, where he was discovered and put to death.
Modena to the Archduchess Elizabeth of Austria." James IV. was slain in the fatal battle of Flod-
SELLE (DE MONTPENSIER)

.We went forward a to his only daughter, Mary Stuart (better known as
CHARLES THE SECOND'S COURTSHIP OF MADEMOI- his army at Solway Moss. He left his dominions
league to meet him. When he appeared every one the unfortunate Mary Queen of Scots), who, after
alighted; he first saluted their Majesties and then suffering eighteen years' imprisonment, was behead-
myself. I thought him very good-looking, much ed at Fotheringay Castle, Northamptonshire, on
more so than when he left France; and, if his intel the 8th of February, 1387. Henry Stuart, Earl of
lect had appeared to me to equal his person, per- Darnley, the husband of Mary Queen of Scots, died
haps he might have pleased me on that occasion, the victim of revenge. His house in Edinburgh
him about dogs, horses, the Prince of Orange, and unfortunate monarch's body was found next day in
When he was in the carriage, the King questioned was blown up in the night by gunpowder, and the
the sport in that country; to all which he answered the garden adjoining James I. of England and
in French. The Queen wished to have some par sixth of Scotland), the son of Henry Earl of Darn-
ticulars of his political position but he did not re-ley, died in 1625, not without suspicion of being
ply to her inquiries, and, when he was asked at poisoned by Villiers Duke of Buckingham. Charles
different times to explain several very serious facts 1., his son, was beheaded at Whitehall. Charles
which were of considerable importance to his per- lived an exile and a fugitive during the twely

by saying he could not speak our language. I own throne, he lived a life of licentions

MISCELLANIES.

[April

, stimony of their "The sovereign who, of all the rest, bas reigned

public orator the longest period, is the Prince of Schaumburg the completion Lippe, who is in the 61st year of his reign, ineluding

with renewed the years of his minority. Of the others, three have ag on his strong reigned upwards of 40 years

, including the period of unbroken stady, their minority; these are, the Princes & Lippeof threescore Detmold and Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt

, and the ting this under. Duke of Saxe-Meiningen. Two have reigned ma scale of six between 30 and 40 years, six between 20 and 30, lindness in the 22 between 10 and 20, and 15 (including the elector ad to the opera- of Hesse and the Duke of Parma, who only

relief from a assumed the reins of Government in 1847), hare Eorical author. not yet reigned 10 years. 4, with the aid "Six sovereigns are unmarried, or have never has eloquently been married. These are, independently of the the world some Pope, the Grand Duke of Mecklenburgb-Schwerib, iterary history, the Duke of Brunswick and the Princes of Renss. Literature." It Schleitz, Reuss-Lobenstein-Eberdorff, and Waldeck progress of this

"Six are widowers, viz., the King of Hanover, of our history the Grand Dukes of Darmstardt and Oldenburgh, rength-the life the Duke of Nassau, and the Princes of Hohenly understood, zollern-Sigmaringen, and Hohenzollern-Hechingen e of Pope, his * One sovereign lives in a state of polygamy;

another (the Elector of Hesse) married according to ce at his coun. the morganatic mode, or with the left hand , 36 hare kinghamshire. espoused princesses of reigning houses; and amongst ferred to, and them one has married a third time, and eight a Eitted to notice, second time. buth, of several

4 The oldest of the wives of these 36 sovereigos blished anony-|(amongst whom there are three female crowned tion. Among heads) is the Queen of France, who is 65 years and Mejnoun and 8 months old; and the youngest is the Duchess of our literature, Modena, who is 24 years and 9 months old. The uce to propriety longest married is the Grand Duchess of Weimar, mce of "Flim who has been a wife 43 years and 5 months. Of

written in all 44 sovereigns, married or widowers, 19 have no mns and Corre-issue, or only by morganatic marriages

. Of the leve, with au- other 32, those who have the largest number of Hied a widow- children, after the Sultan, are the Prince of Lichtenhad been unit- stein, who has nine; the King of Bavaria and the ring of 1847. Prince of Lippe, each of whom has eight; the mns, the eldest Queen of Portugal and the Grand Duke of Baden, ghamshire.- each of whom has seven.

"The Dukes of Saxe Altenburg having only

daughters, it follows that only 31 sovereigns possess EREIGNS. presumptive heirs qualified to succeed them; and

Leipsic, pub amongst these the king of the French, has as his -the following successor, a grandson;

the Emperor of Brazil

, a mgical details daughter; and all the rest, sons. ope

"Fourteen sovereigns have only collateral relareigning prin- tives as their successors; 10 have brothers; the two owing to Queen of Spain, her sister; and the Elector of hen, in which Hesse, a cousin. mabdication of "Five sovereigns are without any certain succes con of his son, sors in their line, viz, (besides the Pope), the Duke Tuscany-an of Brunswick (whose brother has been declared inTabout, inde capable of reigning), the Duke of Anhalt-Beraburg

death of the and the Princes of Hohenzollern-Hechingen and

of January, Reuss Lobenstein-Ebersdorff. n Europe, or "Amongst the 45 princes who are either hereditary .

or presumptive heirs (of whom the Prince d' Elec are only two toral Hesse, 60 years of age, is the oldest and the the venerable Imperial Princess of Brazil, only 1 year and 5 e Princes of months

old, is the youngest), 23 are married to prinage, and the cesses of equal birth; but one of them, dhe Crown urs and four Prince of Denmark, has already ben divorced a

second time: 18 of these princes hare children, en 60 and 70 amongst them the Prince John of Sarony, who has mine belween eight, is the possessor of the largest number , and seven * The following changes nuk place in 1817 wo still under amongst the members of the sovereign families: who is nearly

The number of deaths was 14, including, as in he Prince of 1846, three reigning princes, vix, the Elector of

Hesse, the Duke of Anhalı-Kothen, and the Duchess

that, from that moment, I resolved not to conclude apoplexy. James II., his hou
the marriage, for I conceived a very poor opinion throne, and died in exile

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Swiss Love of Titles. The number of opulent | Lord Rosse stepped forward, and said he thought he families whose sons are eager to become officers could make it work. No sooner said than done. causes an overwhelming superfluity of colonels, He put his hand to the work, discovered by an inmajors, and captains. I have already described how stani's look where the machinery was out of order, we meet presidents at every turn in Switzerland; and made a few turns, put all to rights, and then who have, however, according to our notions, no- the machine, to the admiration of the company, thing president-like about them. In the same way worked beautitully. Lord Oxmantown (for that was communal-councillors, circuit-councillors, and men then his only title) was dressed rather roughly, and of the strangest, most varied and high-sounding de- not in drawing room habiliments, so that he might nominations, abound in every corner. Even these, be mistaken for what he was not-a poor mechanic. however, seem not to be considered enough; for all He had already, however, proved himself to be a who have at any time of their lives filled official first rate one. "Led by his rather rude appearance stations continue to bear about with them their for- to suppose that he was a workman who would be mer title, prefixing, however, an ex. Hence the glad of a job, a gentleman accosted him, and sayenormous number of ex-state-councillors, ex-burgo-ing he was in want of a man of talent like him, masters, ex-commune-presidents, and ex.communal- offered to employ him at a liberal salary. Lord councillors, &c.; though the rage for titles is as se- Rosse of course politely declined the offer, which, verely satirized in Switzerland as similar follies however, was perhaps as honorable to him who among ourselves. It remains, however, unabated, made it, as to him to whom it was made especially among the ladies, who appear resolutely determined that their husbands should be betitled, AN AUTHOR IN DIFFICULTIES.-In a series of somehow or other. I heard in Zurich of a “Mrs. papers, entitled the Autobiography of a Working Vice-Inspector of Fire-engines." (Frau Vice-Sprü. Man, at present in the course of publication in the zen Meisterin); and such instances are not excep- Manchester Examiner, we find the following curious tions : let the title be what it will, so it be but a title, statement:—The writer had returned from Spain it is welcome to a Swiss.

in 1837, after fighting the battles of Queen Chris

tina, with no other reward in his pocket than a cerThe New ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY.—The tificate for six months' arrears of pay, which he Bishop of Chester has been appointed to the archie- offered first for £1, then for 10s., then 5s., and lastly piscopal see of Canterbury, vacant by the death of for a quire of paper, on which to commence a the late Dr. Howley :-"Our estimable and revered Narrative of the British Legion in Spain. He says: diocesan, the Lord Bishop of Chester,” says the —"I got a suit of clothes made to appear in on Chester Courant of Wednesday, “is appointed to landing in Scotland; but was robbed of clothes succeed the late Dr. Howley as Archbishop of Can- and every farthing of money before I got on board terbury. This promotion of the pious and learned the ship.' I might have found friends and have got Dr. Sumner to the primacy will be hailed with lively assistance in Glasgow. I would not, in the dirty resatisfaction by numerous and influential parties in gimentals I was clothed in, go to any person who "the Church. The right rev. prelate left Chester for had before known me. The person to whom I ofLondon last evening (Tuesday), in compliance with fered my certificate of six months' gratuity for a a royal message requiring his attendance in the quire of writing paper and pen and ink to begin to metropolis.” Dr. John Bird Sumner, a canon of write my narrative of the Legion, would give noDurham, was consecrated Bishop of Chester in thing for the worthless certificate, but made me a 1828.

present of several quires of writing paper. I walked

out of G'asgow, three or four miles up the Clyde, “REMINISCENCES OF Prince TALLEYRAND.”—We got into a field of beans nearly ripe, crept out of are requested to state that this work is edited from sight to the middle of the field, there lay three days the papers of M. Colmache, the Prince's private and nights, writing the first chapters of my narrasecretary: This announcement confirms our con- tive, and living on the beans. I sent the farmer a jecture that the work had a foundation in truths, copy of the work afterwards as a payment for what though fiction was so mixed up with fact in its com- I had eaten.” It is pleasant to learn that the work position that it was impossible to know what por- thus commenced sold extensively, and produced 10 tions were to be depended on. Throughout, the the author a clear profit of £100. work purports to be written, not by the Prince's secretary but by a distinguished English Diploma King HUDSON AND HER MAJESTY'S ENGLISHlist, and many pages of the book are expressly writ. We have received a lithographic circular letter this ten to give color to the fable. However meagre the week, in which the Lord Mayor of York has perpapers of M. Colmache might be, they would, if petrated a most atrocious and cruel assault upon edited with veracity and judgment, have had a va- her Majesty's English. The first, second, and third lue the book cannot now pretend to. We express persons dance and mingle throughout the circular our opinion the more freely, as we fear that origi- | in all the mazes of a "dinner” confusion.

" The dal papers of real importance are often cruelly Lord Mayor presents his compliments” to Mr. A. mangled by the incompetency of the "editor" to B., and “would be glad if he would “avail themwhose care they are committed. Any work pre-selves” of a train " which leaves the station at ten tending to a biographical character must needs be o'clock.” The Lord Mayor requests an "early anworthless if we cannot repose confidence in its swer so as to know by what train you propose to genuineness and authenticity.

come.” But the happiest announcement is, that

“the Lord Mayor is surry he is unable to offer a bed Lord Rosse A Mechanic.-On one occasion to all the members of the corporation.” Oh! Mr. when he was but a youth, he went to an exhibition Hudson, what a flogging your schoolmaster deat the Adelaide Gallery, where some kind of Lon-serves ! - Yorkshireman. don steam engine was being exhibited. By some means or other the exhibitor could not set his engine going; ail his efforts to effect it were in vain, and he was about to give it up in despair, when

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Iny work preselves" of a train which leaves the lat len

come." But the happiest annonsent is that

the Lord Mayor is sorry he is wide to offer a bed one occasion to all the members of the corpusion." Ok! Mr. - an exhibition Hudson, whát a flogging your schoolmaster dem MISCELLANIES.

[March, 1848. number of opulent Lord Rosse stepped forward, and said he thought he to become officers could make it work. No sooner said than done. fluity of colonels, He put his hand to the work, discovered by an ineady described how stani's look where the machinery was out of order, n in Switzerland; and made a few turns, put all to rights, and then o our notions, no- the machine, to the admiration of the company,

In the same way worked beautifully. Lord Oxmantown (for that was ancillors, and men then his only title) was dressed rather roughly, and high-sounding de- not in drawing room habiliments

, so that he might der. Even these, be mistaken for what he was not-a poor mechanic d enough; for all He had already, however, proved himself to be a ives filled official first rate one. Led by his rather rude appearance th them their for- to suppose that he was a workman who would be

e. Hence the glad of a job, a gentleman accosted bim, and sarcillors, ex-burgo-ing he was in want of a man of talent like him, and ex-communal- offered to employ him at a liberal salary

. Lord for titles is as se- Rosse of course politely declined the offer

, which

, as similar follies however

, was perhaps as honorable to him who wever, unabated, made it, as to him to whom it was made appear resolutely should be betitled, AN AUTHOR IN DIFFICULTIES.--In a series of urich of a "Mrs. papers, entitled the Autobiography of a Werking Frau Vice-Sprü- Man, at present in the course of publication in the ces are not excep- Manchester Examiner, we find the following curinas o it be bat a title, statement :-The writer had returned from Spain

in 1837, after fighting the battles of Queen Caris.

tina, with no other reward in his pocket than a cerNTERBURY.-The tificate for six months' arrears of pey, which he ated to the archie offered first for £1, then for 10s, then 5s, and lastly mt by the death of for a quire of paper, on which to commence à nable and revered Narrative of the British Legion in Spain. He says: hester," says the -"I got a suit of clothes made to appear in an is appointed to landing in Scotland; but was robbed of clothes chbishop of Can- and every farthing of money before I got on board ious and learned the ship. I might have found friends and have got mailed with lively assistance in Glasgow, I would not, in the dirty remential parties in gimentals I was clothed in, go to any person who e left Chester for had before known me. The person to whom I of compliance with fered my certificate of six months

' gratuity for a tendance in the quire of writing paper and pen and ink to begin to ner, a canon of write my narrative of the Legion, would give noof Chester in thing for the worthless certificate, bat made me a

present

of several quires of writing paper. I walked out of Glasgow,

three or four miles up the Clyde,
„EYRAND."-We got into a field of beans nearly ripe, crept out of
k is edited from sight to the middle of the field, there lay three days
Prince's private and nights, wricing the first chapters of my naira-
onfirms our con- tive, and living on the beans. I sent the farmer a
ation in truths, copy of the work afterwards as a payment for what

fact in its com. I had eaten." It is pleasant to learn that the mark
know what por- thus commenced sold extensively, and produced by
Throughout the the author a clear profit of £100.
by the Prince's
glish Diploma KING HUDSON AND HER Majesty's Exca.s.-

expressly writ. We have received a lithographic circular Peter is
ever meagre the week, in which the Lord Mayor of York has per
they would, if petrated a most atrocious and cruel assault at
have had a va. her Majesty's English. The first second, and
2. We express persons dance and mingle throughout the other
fear that origi- in all the mazes of a "dinner " confusion

often cruelly Lord Mayor presents his compliments"
the "editor" to B., and would be glad if he would like
must needs be o'clock." The Lord Mayor requests ar tarly allo
afidence in its swer so as to know by what train propose

kind of Lon-serves! - Yorkshireman.
ted. By some
not set his en-

were in vain,
despair, when

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