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Cliff, Captain Manby was very frequently there; went away as late at night as eleven o'clock. I don't remember Fanny Lloyd being called up any morning to make breakfast for the Princess. I did not like Capt. Manby coming so often, and staying so late, and I was uneasy at it. I remember a piece of plate, a silver lamp, being sent to Captain Manby. I saw it in Sicard's possession. He told me it was for Captain Manby, and he had a letter to send with it. I have never seen Captain Manby at the Princess's at Ramsgate before nine o'clock in the morning, but I have heard he has been there earlier. I had never any suspicions of there being any thing improper, either from the frequent visits of Captain Manby, or from his conduct. I was at Catherington with the Princess. She used to go out generally in her own chaise. I think I have once or twice seen her go with Mr. Hood in his one-horse chaise. They have been out for two hours, or two hours and a half, together. I believe only a day or two elapsed between the time the child being first brought, and being then brought back again, and left with the Princess. I am sure the child was not weaned after it had been first brought. I don't recollect any gentleman ever sleeping in the house. I don't remember Lawrence the painter ever sleeping there. The Princess seems very fond of the child. It is always called William Austin.

THOMAS STIKEMAN. Sworn at Lord Grenville's house in Downing-street, the seventh day of June,

A true Copy,

J. Becket.

1806, before us,

ERSKINE,

SPENCER,

GRENVILLE,

ELLENBOROUGH.

(No. 10.)

The Deposition of John Sicard.

I HAVE lived seven years with the Princess of Wales, am house-steward, and have been in that situation from the end of six months after I first lived with Her Royal Highness. I remember the child who is now with the Princess of Wales being brough there. It was about five months old when it was brough. It is about four years ago, just before we went to Ramsgate. I had not the least suspicion of the object of my being brought here I had opportunity of seeing the Princess frequently. I waited on her at dinner and supper. I never observed that the Princess had the appearance of being with child. I think it was hardly possible that she should have been with child without my perceiving it. Sir Sidney Smith used to visit very frequently at Montague House in 1802, with Sir John and Lady Douglas. He was very often, I believe, alone with the Princess, and so was Mr. Canning, and other gentlemen. I cannot say that I ever suspected Sir Sidney Smith of any improper conduct with the Princess. I never had any suspicion of the Princess acting improperly with Sir Sidney Smith or any other gentleman, I remember Captain Manby visiting at Montague House. The Princess of Wales did not pay for the expence of fitting up his cabin, but the linen furniture was ordered by me, by direction of the Princess, of Newberry and Jones. It was put by Newberry and Jones in the Princess's bill, and was paid for with the rest of the bill by Miss Heyman.

JOHN SICARD. Sworn at Lord Grenville's house in Downing-street, the seventh day of June, 1806, before us,

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(No. 11.)

The Deposition of Charlotte Sander.

I HAVE lived with the Princess of Wales eleven years. I am a native of Brunswick, and came with the Princess from Brunswick. The Princess has a little boy living with her under her protection. He had a mark on his hand, but it is worn off. I first saw him four years ago, in the autumn. The father and mother of the child are still alive. I have seen them both. The father worked in the Dock Yard at Deptford, but has now lost the use of his limbs. The father's name is Austin. The mother brought the child to the Princess when he was four months old. I was present when the child was brought to the Princess. She was in her own room up stairs when the child was brought. She came out and took the child herself. I understood that the child was expected before it was brought. I am sure that I never saw the child in the house before it appeared to be four months old. The Princess was not ill or indisposed in the autumn of 1802. I was dresser to Her Royal Highness. She could not be ill or indisposed without my knowing it. I am sure that she was not confined to her room or to her bed in that autumn. There was not to my knowledge any other child in the house. It was hardly possible there could have been a child there without my knowing it. I have no recollection that the Princess had grown bigger in the year 1802 than usual. I am sure the Princess was not pregnant. Being her dresser, I must have seen if she was. I solemnly and positively swear I have no reason to know or believe that the Princess of Wales has been at any time pregnant during the time I have lived with Her Royal Highness at Montague House. I may have said to Cole that the Princess was grown much thinner, but I

don't recollect that I did. I never heard any body say any thing about the Princess being pregnant till I came here to-day. I did not expect to be asked any question to-day respecting the Princess being pregnant. Nobody came over to the Princess from Germany in the autumn of 1802 to my knowledge. Her Royal Highness was generally blooded twice in a year, but not lately. I never had any reason to suppose that the Princess received the visits of any gentlemen at improper hours. Sir Sidney Smith visited her frequently, and almost daily. He was there very late, sometimes till two o'clock in the morning. I never saw Sir Sidney Smith in a room alone with the Princess late at night. I never saw any thing which led me to suppose that Sir Sidney Smith was on a very familiar footing with the Princess of Wales. I attended the Princess of Wales to Southend. She had two houses, No. 9. and No. 8. I knew Captain Manby. He commanded the Africaine. He visited the Princess. While his ship was there, he was frequently with the Princess. I don't know or believe, and I have no reason to believe, that Captain Manby staid till very late hours with the Princess. I never suspected that there was any improper familiarity between them. I never expressed to any body a wish that Captain Manby's visits were not so frequent. If the Princess had company, I was never present. The Princess was at Ramsgate in 1803. I have seen Captain Manby there frequently. He came to the Princess's house to dinner. He never stayed till late at night at the Princess's house. I was in Devonshire with the Princess lately. There was no one officer that she saw when she was in Devonshire more than the rest. I never heard from the Princess that she apprehended her conduct was questioned. When I was brought here I thought I might be questioned respecting the Princess's conduct, and I was sorry to come. I don't know why I

thought so. I never saw any thing in the conduct of the Princess while I lived with her, which would have made me uneasy if I had been her husband. When I was at Southend I dined in the Steward's room. I can't say whether I ever heard any body in the steward's room say any thing about the Captain, meaning Captain Manby. It is so long ago I may have forgot it. I have seen Captain Manby alone with the Princess at No. 9, in'the drawing-room at Southend. I have seen it only once or twice. It was at two or three o'clock in the afternoon, and never later. I slept in a room next to the Princess in the house No. 9, at Southend. I never saw Captain Manby in any part of that house but the drawing-room. I have no reason to believe he was in any other room in the house. I was at Catherington with the Princess. She was at Mr. Hood's house. I never saw any familiarity between her and Mr. Hood. I have seen her drive out in Mr. Hood's carriage with him alone. It was a gig. They used to be absent for several hours. A servant of the Princess attended them. I have delivered packets by the order of the Princess, which she gave me sealed up, to Sicard, to be by him forwarded to Captain Manby. The birth-day of the child who lives with the Princess is the 11th of July, as his mother told me. She says that he was christened at Deptford. The child had a mark on the hand. The mother told me that it was from red wine. I believe the child came to the Princess in November.

C. SANDER.

Sworn at Lord Grenville's house in Downing-street, the seventh day of June, 1806.

ERSKINE,

SPENCER,

A true Copy,

J. Becket.

GRENVILLE,

ELLENBOROUGH.

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