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The right honourable the Lord Chief Baron of the Court

of Exchequer,

The right honourable the Judge of the High Court of
Admiralty,

The right honourable the Dean of the Arches ;

Having been summoned by command of your Royal Highness, on the 19th of February, to meet at the office of Viscount Sidmouth, Secretary of State for the home department, a communication was made by his lordship to the lords then present, in the following terms ;--

"MY LORDS,--I have it in command from his Royal Highness the Prince Regent, to acquaint your lordships, that a copy of a letter from the Princess of Wales to the Prince Regent having appeared in a public paper, which letter refers to the proceedings that took place in an Inquiry instituted by command of his Majesty, in the year 1806, and contains among other matters, certain animadversions upon the manner in which the Prince Regent has exercised his undoubted right of regulating the conduct and education of his daughter the Princess Charlotte; and his Royal Highness having taken into his consideration the said letter so published, and adverting to the directions heretofore given by his Majesty, that the documents relating to the said Inquiry should be sealed up, and deposited in the office of his Majesty's principal Secretary of State, in order that his Majesty's government should possess the means of resorting to them if necessary, his Royal Highness has been pleased to direct, that the said letter of the Princess of Wales, and the whole of the said documents, together with the copies of other letters and papers, of which a schedule is annexed, should be referred to your lordships, being members of his Majesty's most honourable Privy Council, for your consideration and that you should report to his Royal Highness your opinion, whether, under all the circumstances of the case, it be fit and proper that the intercourse between the Princess of Wales and her daughter the Princess Charlotte, should continue to be subject to regulations and restrictions."

"Their lordships adjourned their meetings to Tuesday, the 23d of February; and the intermediate days having been em

ployed in perusing the documents referred to them, by command of your Royal Highness, they proceeded on that and the following day to the further consideration of the said documents, and have agreed to report to your Royal Highness as follows:

"In obedience to the commands of your Royal Highness,we have taken into our most serious consideration the letter from her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales to your Royal Highness, which has appeared in the public papers, and has been referred to us by your Royal Highness, in which letter the Princess of Wales, amongst other matters, complains that the intercourse between her Royal Highness, and her Royal Highness the Princess Charlotte, has been subjected to certain restrictions.

"We have also taken into our most serious consideration, together with the other papers referred to us by your Royal Highness, all the documents relative to the Inquiry instituted in 1806, by command of his Majesty, into the truth of cer tain representations, respecting the conduct of her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales, which appear to have been pressed upon the attention of your Royal Highness, in consequence of the advice of Lord Thurlow, and upon grounds of public duty; by whom they were transmitted to his Majesty's consideration; and your Royal Highness having been graciously pleased to command us to report our opinions to your Royal Highness, whether, under all the circumstances of the case, it be fit and proper, that the intercourse between the Princess of Wales and her daughter, the Princess Charlotte, should continue to be subject to regulation and restraint:

"We beg leave humbly to report, to your Royal Highness, that after a full examination of all the documents before us, we are of opinion, that under all the circumstances of the case, it is highly fit and proper, with a view to the welfare of her Royal Highness the Princess Charlotte, in which are equally involved the happiness of your Royal Highness, in your pa rental and royal character, and the most important interests of the State, that the intercourse between her Royal Highness

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the Princess of Wales, and her Royal Highness the Princess Charlotte, should continue to be subject to regulation and restraint.

"We humbly trust that we may be permitted, without being thought to exceed the limits of the duty imposed on us, respectfully to express the just sense we entertain of the motives by which your Royal Highness has been actuated in the postponement of the Confirmation of her Ryal Highness the Princess Charlotte; as it appears, by a statement under the hand of her Majesty the Queen, that your Royal Highness has conformed in this respect to the declared will of his Majesty; who had been pleased to direct, that such ceremony should not take place till her Royal Highness should have completed her eighteenth year.

"We also humbly trust that we may be further permitted to notice some expressions in the letter of her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales, which may possibly be construed as implying a charge of too serious a nature to be passed over without observation. We refer to the words" suborned traducers." As this expression, from the manner it is introduced, may, perhaps, be liable to misconstruction (however impossible it may be to suppose that it can have been so intended) to have reference to some part of the conduct of your Royal Highness; we feel it our bounden duty not to omit this opportunity of declaring, that the documents laid before us, afford the most ample proof, that there is not the slightest foundation for such an aspersion..

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The next document of importance is a letter addressed to the Right Honourable the Speaker of the House of Commons, by the Princess of Wales, in which her Royal Highness called for an investigation of her conduct, before Judges known to the Constitution, in order that she might either be declared to be innocent, or proved guilty. A copy of this letter was also transmitted to the Lord Chancellor.

Immediately, upon the Meeting of the House of Commons, on March 2nd. the SPEAKER rose and observed, he thought it his duty to acquaint the House, that in the afternoon of yesterday, he had received a paper which purported to be a letter from her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales, the contents of which it would have, of course, been his duty to communicate to the House; but as it was delivered merely to one of the door-keepers, he forbore to take any steps on the receipt of it until it was properly authenticated. In so acting, he trusted, that he had not interposed so as to prevent, or improperly to delay, the approach of such a document to the consideration of the House of Commons. This morning the letter in question was authenticated; he had received a duplicate of it, inclosed in another letter from her Royal Highness, and both of these letters, with the permission of the House, he should now read to them.

The House having signified its assent, the SPEAKER proceeded to read the first letter, which was to the following effect:

Montague-House, March 2.

"The Princess of Wales begs to inform Mr. Speaker, that by her own desire, as well as in consequence of the advice of her Counsel, she yesterday transmitted to him a letter, the contents of which she was anxious should be made known to the House of Commons; and with that view her Royal Highness now incloses herewith a duplicate of that letter." The inclosure was as follows:

"Montague-House, Blackheath, March 1, 1813. "The Princess of Wales informs (Mr. Speaker) the Lord Chancellor, that she has received from the Lord Viscount

Sidmouth a copy of a Report made to his Royal Highness the Prince Regent, by a certain number of the Meinbers of his Privy Council, to whom it appears, that his Royal Highness had been advised to refer the consideration of documents, and other evidence, respecting her character and conduct.

"The Report is of such a nature, that her Royal Highness feels persuaded no person can read it without considering it as conveying aspersions upon her; and although their vagueness renders it impossible to discover precisely what is meant, or even what she has been charged with; yet, as the Princess feels conscious of no offence whatever, she thinks it due to herself, to the illustrious Houses with which she is connected by blood and by marriage, and to the people, among whom she holds so distinguished a rank, not to acquiesce, for a moment, in any imputation affecting her honour.

"The Princess of Wales has not been permitted to know upon what evidence the Members of the Privy Council proceeded, still less to be heard in her defence. She knew only by common rumours of the inquiries which they have been carrying on, until the result of those inquiries was communicated to her, and she has no means now of knowing whether the Members acted as a body to which she can appeal for redress, at least for a bearing; or only in their individual capacities, as persons selected to make a Report upon her conduct.

"The Princess is therefore compelled to throw herself upon the wisdom and justice of Parliament, and to desire that the fullest investigation may be instituted of her whole conduct during the period of her residence in this country.

"The Princess fears no scrutiny, however strict, provided she may be tried by impartial Judges, known to the constitution, and in the fair and open manner which the law of the land prescribes.

"Her only desire is, that she may either be treated as innocent, or proved to be guilty.

"The Princess of Wales desires Mr. Speaker (the Lord Chancellor) to communicate this letter to the House of Commons."

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