Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub

expected, he makes no effort to conceal his prepossessions for the doctrine and ritual of the Church of England.

A pleasing duty now remains, to thank those friends of the Author who have given him the benefit of their suggestions, and examined for him such references as lay beyond the compass of his own library. He would especially mention the Rev. C. Hardwick, and the Rev. J. S. Purton, Fellows of St Catharine's Hall, whose kindness in this matter is accepted as an evidence of true friendship, worthy of the members of their ancient brotherhood.

WITTON VICARAGE,
The Feast of the Circumcision, 1855.

A HISTORY

OF THE

BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.

CHAPTER I.

Service-Books of the English Church before the
Reformation.

'According to these various uses (various yet harmonious) the Holy
Eucharist was celebrated in England until the year 1547. Their
origin cannot be attributed merely to man's ingenuity, and learning,
or even piety; but they are to be traced through the Sacramentaries
of Gregory, Gelasius, and Leo, to the well-spring of all Christian
truth, the age of the Apostles.'-MASKELL.

THE Liturgies of the Western Church seem to be derived from two models, the Roman and the Gallican. The Gallican was of Oriental origin, and is said to have been followed by the churches of Spain and Britain1. But whatever may have been the earlier history of Christianity in this island, it is clear that at the close of the sixth century the portion afterwards called England' was occupied by tribes of heathen, and the British Church compelled to seek a shelter in the districts of Wales, Cumberland and Cornwall.

6

USES.

Augustine, the missionary from Pope Gregory the Mission of Great, doubtless brought with him the Ritual which was at the Anglo

1 See Palmer, Antiquities of the English Ritual, 'Dissertation on Primitive Liturgies,' § VI. Lit. of Rome, § IX. Lit. of Gaul, § XI. 31

Lit. of Britain and Ireland.

See Soames, Ang.-Sax. Church, 'Introduction;' Carte, Hist. of England, I. 183.

Augustine to

Saxons.
A.D. 597.

« PoprzedniaDalej »