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BY
THE REV. W. CARUS WILSON, M. A.,

RECTOR OF WHITTINGTON,
AND PERPETUAL CURATE OF CASTERTON.

VOL. XXV.

KIRKBY LONSDALE:
PRINTED AND SOLD BY J. FOSTER.
SOLD BY SERLEY, BURNSIDE, AND SEELEY, LONDON,

AND BY ALL OTHBR BOOKSELLERS.

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CHILDREN'S FRIEND.

No. 289.]

JANUARY, 1848.

[VOL. 25.

MOUNT EGMONT, IN NEW ZEALAND. In New Zealand there is a mountain of the same kind as Vesuvius, pamely, in having once been a burning volcano. It has ceased for so many years to throw up either fire or smoke, that the people of the country have never heard their fathers speak of it. Yet the evi. dences that it once did so are so plain, that no reasonable person can doubt it. A traveller, who has himself ascended it, has written an account of his laborious walk to the summit, and informs us that not one of the native New Zealanders had ever dared to mount it. They felt such' strong superstitious fears of what they should find inhabiting its solitary heights, that they never ventured to go up more than about a quarter of the way. Some of them went with him to the spot where the continual snow begins, and then left him to accomplish his journey with only one companion, and him an European. He relates, that throughout almost the whole way he was constantly finding large pieces of ashy matter, or burnt hardened stone-the plain tokens of violent eruptions of flaming materials from the interior of the mountain in former ages. The further he ascended the more these appearances met him, until at length the whole ground bore the marks of fire : at the same time it was covered with snow, which never melted !-So great are the changes on the surface of the earth. This mountain, which once gleamed with a blaze of flames, and was scorched with fiery heat, is now perpetually cased in snow. It is, however, a happy change for the country around, when we remember the disastrous effects of a burning mountain, as they have so often been felt in Italy even in our own days.

The print represents not only this mountain appearing in the distance, but also a very interesting New Zealand village in the foreground. The villages, which are forti. fied as this is, or defended against the assaults of enemies by works thrown round them, are called by the name of pahs; and this appears a peculiarly safe and strong situation, from the remarkable height and steepness of the vast cliff on which it stands.

Missionary labours have been greatly blessed in New Zealand. We cannot give a more pleasing proof of this than in the following account sent by Mr. Davies, the missionary :

He visited a Pa at Pateriteri, belonging to two Christian chiefs, Perika and Noa, who were brothers. They were expecting an attack from Ripa, a chief of Hokianga. Ripa had made an unjust demand from the two Christian chiefs, and, on their refusal to comply with it, he had marched to attack

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