Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub

Great Gallery
near Gondo

Galerie de
Schalbet
-d'Algaby
- de Ganthar
Galerie d'Yeselle
des Glaciers
Ponte Alto
Pcnt de St.
Maurice

Dovedro and

Crevola

Defile of Dovedro

Val d'Ossola Pont de Crevola

Miles all night at the village of Simplon, to start afresh towards the beauties of Dovedro and Crevola, the Inn will be found very comfortable, with the recommendation of being 4840 feet above the level of the sea, and offering chamois and a light champaign to solace you in your fatigue. Across this stupendous Pass, full of Nature's wildest looks and her sweetest smiles, you are conveyed in a char à-banc containing four persons, and built so low that you descend when you please. The road into Italy is very sublime, and will be enhanced even by a due portion of, not fear perhaps, but something very like it. A diligence leaves Geneva, as I have before stated, three days in the week, which will engage to take you to Milan, but you must stop short of Milan at Baveno, on the Lago Maggiore, where there is a good Hotel near the Borromean Islands; having seen which, return to Baveno and take the steam-boat, which passes every morning down the Lake from Sesto Calende.

130

BAVENO
on the

LAGO MAGGIORE

BORROMEAN

ISLANDS.

SESTO CALENDE

LAVENO

and Lake of Como

LAKE of LU-
GANO.

CADENOBBIA.

LAKE of COMO.

[ocr errors]

Go to Laveno, where there is a tolerable Hotel on the right. The Lake presents a fine variety of scenery, and is at the end encompassed with stupendous mountains. 15 Hire a carriage to Lugano, a pleasant Lake abounding with fish, not far distant, to the extremity of which take a boat, and there hire a carriage to Cadenobbia, a town on the Lake of Como, where there is an excellent Hotel, and an intelligent landlord who

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Italy: Como-Milan.

speaks English. This is a most interesting excursion, and brings you about twothirds down on the Lake. There are some charming chateaux to be seen, containing statues and paintings; one of which, a little higher up, take a boat and see, ascending a hill which commands the three divisions of the Lake, afterwards returning to the Hotel. The steam-boat stops for passengers at the Hotel on its way to Como. This is certainly the Queen of LakesNature and Art alike embellish it. Villas and villages sparkle on its banks, amidst verdant uplands and luxuriant gardens. With a mind at ease and body " unwrung," Como might be a paradise. To those doomed to even "the sweet shady side of Pall-Mall," it is torturingly beautiful, appearing like a thing got up for the occasion "by particular desire," "full of cunnynglye contryved beautyes and choyce devyces." 45 This is a very good town, with an excellent Hotel. The walks by the Lake are very pleasant, being surrounded by villas. The Cathedral is ancient and worthy of notice.

Miles.

25

35

A noble city, and most decidedly the best in Italy. The suburb white marble Cathedral, with the tomb of St. Carlo Borromeo, malgré its intrusive Grecian windows, ought to enchant you, having this advantage over an Italian that to you, marble is somewhat of a rara avis,—to him, niente. The Circus, the Arch of Napoleon-the

S. Ambrozio La Scala Theatre

La Canobiana
Gallery
Gymnasium
The Palace
Amphitheatre
The Hospital
Refectory of Sta.
Maria delle
Grazie

Last Supper
Villa Belgioso
Marengo Gate

[merged small][ocr errors]

Miles. Scala (the largest theatre in Europe)—the Picture Gallery and Museums, Leonardo da Vinci's Last Supper in the Refectory, together with the drives and walks, will af ford great amusement. The white of the Austrian uniform often hurts the eyesight. The Hotels are the best in all Italy, and not expensive. There are in all of them Tables d'Hôte, at 4 o'clock; and if you stop any time, they will contract at so much per day. There is no diligence from here to Florence; but there is a malle-post three times a week, which carries two persons at four pence per mile each.

[ocr errors]

St. Filipo Neri La Consolata Corpus Domini,

&c. &c.

72 A drive through a flat but rich and fertile country, leads to Turin, the capital of Piedmont and of the states of the King of Sardinia, The Palace, the Town-House, the Superga, (the burial place of the royal family,) about five miles distant, must not be omitted. You have also a very extensive view of the mountains of Savoy. The Hotel on the Grande Place is the only good Should you deviate in this route and go to Pavia, do not omit seeing the Chartreuse.

one.

Palazzo Carignano
King's Palace
University

(Note.)-From Paris to Milan, direct over the Simplon, is about 540 miles; but by taking the route through Switzerland, it is double the distance.

Teatro di Carignano
Grand Theatre
The Grand Walk
PAVIA to

GENOA in Italian Genova.

The Bochetta
Palazzo Andrea

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The Cathedral
Chiesa S. Maria
Annunciata

Italy: Turin-Genoa-Leghorn.

37

120

Miles. This is a fine mountain drive, replete with the richest scenery, the latter part over the new road across the Bochetta. There is a good diligence from Turin to Genoa, stopping one night at Alexandria, a town in great decay, but with a tolerable Hotel. The descent into Genoa by the Bochetta is very grand. The Palaces and Churches in Genoa are among the finest in Italy, and abound with choice paintings. The Bay is second only to Naples. The hills are covered with vineyards forming an amphitheatre round the city. There is a fine Theatre, and the Hotels are upon a grand scale. Take a boat and row about the bay.

S. Ambrogio
S. Stefano

S. Dominico

Promenade of
Acqua Verde

Bay

Teatro S. Agostino
The Hospital
Incurables
Albergo dei Po-

veri

SPEZIA

LUCCA
PISA

Leaning Tower

Campo Santo
The Arno

LEGHORN, in Italian Livorno.

Pursuing your road to the South, you will
pass Spezia with its splendid harbor, and
the marble quarries of Massa.
Lucca, a fine city, with Cathedral and
Churches adorned with paintings. Pisa,
the remains of a large ancient town, but
very dull.
The Cathedral, Cemetery,
Leaning Tower, Monastery, Botanic Gar-
dens, are all curious objects. The Campo
Santo will of course be visited. The Arno
flows through the town, over which are
three bridges. This is considered the best
and mildest place for invalids in Italy.
House-rent in the winter is high, but pro-
visions are cheap.

158 Leghorn, about 12 miles from Pisa, is a very large trading sea-port, with a safe harbor. Amongst its population are 20,000

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Jews, who inhabit one part of the city. One long street runs through it, but the place is dirty and the houses old, wanting the aristocratic look of the other Italian cities. Industry may thrive here, but the traveller's epicurean vision will seek in vain for the treasures of art,-the badge of Italia. It is resorted to for bathing in the season. The Lazzaretto is worth noticing. You may go from Leghorn to Florence, a fine drive of 70 miles, through villages, (the inhabitants of which are engaged in making straw bonnets,) and thence to Rome, in which case you will not return through Florence, as hereafter proposed, but by the Adriatic and Bologna.

Note. Those who go to Rome through the South of France will find a steam-boat that leaves Marseilles three times a week, and proceeds to Naples, landing passengers at Genoa, Leghorn, and Civita Vecchia, and this would save both expense and time, if the sea could be depended on, and there would be nothing lost in point of country, since, by returning from Naples to Florence, you would pass the same route by land. It is calculated that by this plan ten days would be saved in going to Naples-and the voyage, after allowing for stoppages at the several places, cannot in fair weather exceed three days, having no tide to contend with.

There is no regular diligence going from
Leghorn to Rome, so that you must go by
Vetturino.

es.

Siena stands high and enjoys the sea-breezIt is considered the best air in Italy for a constant residence, being free from malaria, on account of which, and for its cheapness, many English reside there. It is a large old town, with several Churches worthy of notice, particularly the Cathedral, which is a superb edifice adorned with fine paintings, especially the frescoes of

« PoprzedniaDalej »