The Literary Remains of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: The fall of Robespierre. Poems. A course of lectures. Omniana

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Strona 149 - My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears, And true plain hearts do in the faces rest, Where can we find two better hemispheres Without sharp north, without declining west? Whatever dies was not mixed equally; If our two loves be one, or thou and I Love so alike that none do slacken, none can die.
Strona 194 - ... shall a trumpet be blown in the city, and the people not be afraid? shall there be evil in a city, and the Lord hath not done it?
Strona 96 - Her angels face, As the great eye of heaven, shyned bright, And made a sunshine in the shady place : Did never mortall eye behold such heavenly grace.
Strona 390 - People. Lord, have mercy upon us, and incline our hearts to keep this law. Minister. Thou shalt not make to thyself any graven image, nor the likeness of any thing that, is in heaven above, or in the earth beneath, or in the water under the earth. Thou shalt not bow down to them, nor worship them...
Strona 112 - Full many a glorious morning have I seen Flatter the mountain tops with sovereign eye, Kissing with golden face the meadows green, Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy; Anon permit the basest clouds to ride With ugly rack on his celestial face, And from the forlorn world his visage hide, Stealing unseen to west with this disgrace : Even so my sun one early morn did shine With...
Strona 244 - I give no alms to satisfy the hunger of my brother, but to fulfil and accomplish the will and command of my God...
Strona 246 - Another misery there is in affection ; that whom we truly love like our own selves, we forget their looks, nor can our memory retain the idea of their faces ; and it is no wonder, for they are ourselves, and our affection makes their looks our own.
Strona 286 - He tugged, he shook, till down they came, and drew The whole roof after them with burst of thunder Upon the heads of all who sat beneath, Lords, ladies, captains, counsellors, or priests, Their choice nobility and flower, not only Of this, but each Philistian city round, Met from all parts to solemnize this feast.
Strona 216 - It is, therefore, the power of humanizing nature, of infusing the thoughts and passions of man into every thing which is the object of his contemplation; color, form, motion, and sound, are the elements which it combines, and it stamps them into unity in the mould of a moral idea.
Strona 223 - He who combines the two is the man of genius; and for that reason he must partake of both. Hence there is in genius itself an unconscious activity; nay, that is the genius in the man of genius.

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